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Do you find yourself thinking of death often?

batteries included

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I think it about it every day since you put the thread up.

I enjoy it in entertainment sometimes. I don't like it as a regular thing though. My husband likes Criminal Minds. I don't like that someone dies every episode. I could do without that. Deaths need to be built up to mean something. There was a poignant death in The Beach. That's a morbid movie. You ever seen it?

Oh, for sure. Even on television death should have some significance surrounding it. If I wanted mindless slaughter, I could just play a video game.

I haven't seen The Beach. I'll check it out, thanks.
 

Schrödinger's Name

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From time to time. Sometimes I wonder how I will react and feel when someone close to me passes away. Maybe it's kinda weird to put it like this... But everyone who is important to me is still alive. I don't know how it feels when a loved one dies. For some reason I seem to have this mindset that it won't happen to me. But of course, everyone will die eventually, it's a part of life... But 'accepting' that I could possibly loose my friends or my parents because of it? Nah. Then again, don't most people think that 'it won't happen to them'?


What I actually think about the most is that my dad and I share the same birthday. I mean, it's fun and all, always celebrating it together... But the day my dad passes away my/our birthday will become a vivid reminder of what was once there. It will become a day of death and mourning.


I guess the short answer is; yes.
 

neko 4

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When I was young, I was obsessed with death. Now I want nothing to do with it, and am bothered by my skepticism.
 

Peter Deadpan

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I've imagined my own death many times. I don't know if I would say I'm fascinated by the process of death or morbidly obsessed with it, although decomposition and metamorphosis are in many ways the definition of beauty to me. When I imagine dying, it is to see how it would feel. I've imagined dying in violent car crashes, or of cancer... other ways too but mostly those. I also imagine what death is like for other people, both the dying and those who lose them. I can go rather in depth in an effort to understand the emotional weight of death. Sometimes I wonder if my own death will somehow lead others to better know and understand me. I'm sure it won't and even my death will be in vain making life pointless in some ways.

I haven't fully faced my own mortality and yet at times I find myself longing for death.
 

Lark

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I haven't fully faced my own morbidity and yet at times I find myself longing for death.

I could never say that, at best I would say I try not to fear it.

I have read and do read a lot of great books about people facing death, how they cope with anxiety or other feelings about it, and I tend to think that at the bottom of all thinking or feeling or acting, whatever way it is described or depicted, is a struggle between life and death.

One day I hope that mankind overcomes death altogether and becomes immortal, I hope it is not corrupting when they do and if it is the preserve of a few and not universal then it will be corrupting, there's plenty of evidence for that simply from how money operates or other sorts of power.
 

Peter Deadpan

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I could never say that, at best I would say I try not to fear it.

I have read and do read a lot of great books about people facing death, how they cope with anxiety or other feelings about it, and I tend to think that at the bottom of all thinking or feeling or acting, whatever way it is described or depicted, is a struggle between life and death.

One day I hope that mankind overcomes death altogether and becomes immortal, I hope it is not corrupting when they do and if it is the preserve of a few and not universal then it will be corrupting, there's plenty of evidence for that simply from how money operates or other sorts of power.

I never understood the appeal of immortality. I'm not super into the thought of suffering for all of eternity and reexperiencing loss indefinitely. Death isn't the only form of loss.
 

Polaris

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I go through phases of devoting a great deal of thought to death and phases of thinking of it little. I'm generally happier during the latter. At any rate, for me, what occupies my mind with regard to death is the question of what it is for the person who undergoes it. I have not been able to come up with any definite answers, which is hardly surprising. To die is to step across the event horizon of a black hole. Nothing that gets in ever comes out. All I have to solve the mystery are vague, highly questionable scenarios, including the following:

1. A graveyard is a village of the dead. Every time someone is buried there, the dead welcome the newly dead to his or her new home. And they do not reveal to the newly dead that he or she is now a decaying corpse. Instead, they put up a front. They act as though everyone is still alive and well. But eventually the truth begins to dawn on the latest entrant to the village of the dead. And soon, that person must either agree to silence so as to uphold the peace of the graveyard or be silenced forcibly.

2. You are left with nothing but yourself--your thoughts, your dreams, and your conscience. As far as you're concerned, it isn't you but the external world that meets its demise.

3. Other scenarios that I don't feel like writing down right now.
 

Neal Caffreynated

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No I'm more of a "you only live once" kind of guy... I know it exists and I like detective movies but I wouldn't say I'm fascinated by it - I like life a lot more and I'd rather concentrate on that :D
 

laintpe

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Yes, it's my default conversation topic (no matter how hard I try to keep things light). "How did we end up talking about this?" is something I hear frequently at work.
 

Scaven

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Death used to terrify me. That it would all end, and that nobody would ever remember me. I didn’t believe in afterlife, and I still don’t. If it ended, it would be permanent.
But it has changed. I realized that death is not such a bad thing. Death is something only the living can worry about. Death is a certainty and crying about it won’t change anything. So, I thought instead of keeping myself up late at night, I should simply enjoy it as much as I can. It’s like going to Disney land and instead of enjoying every second and making the best out of it, you simply sit on a bench and whine because you’ll have to leave at the end of the day.
I also realized that there is no possibility that I’ll be remember forever. The internet is the biggest revolution of mankind, yet almost nobody even knows who invented it. The truth is, most of us want to be remember because we feel we are not important. But instead of being remembered by doing something remarkable we’ve done; I want to be remembered by the people that knew me. That I won’t be remember in their head, but in their heart.
 

Scaven

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I also watched this course. I believe some of you may be interested in it. it’s a course about the philosophy of death, by the Yale university. In the first half, he explains why he doesn't believe in souls, and then why death isn't that bad.

 

Morpeko

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Yeah, I've been interested in it ever since I was a child.

I remember when I was five years old, I saw some graphic murder scene photos of my aunt and cousin. I saw all the blood and their dead bodies. I remember it quite clearly. It scared the fuck out of me, in a numbing way. Made me realize how mortal we are and how powerless we can be in certain situations.

Ever since then, I've just been thinking about it. Wondering about it in different ways. What it would be like, what our brains go through as we are dying. I often think about why I sometimes try so hard in a life that's just destined to end.

I also think about the afterlife sometimes. I'm almost positive that there is no afterlife, but I often entertain the possibility that there might be one and wonder what it would be like. Especially ghosts I really don't want there to be an afterlife, though.

I have experienced reoccurring suicidal thoughts since middle school, so I often think about suicide as well. (Many of the times it has been passive, however.) It's come to the point that even when I'm not really suicidal and I'm completely fine with living, I find comfort in imagining my death. I have some fears about it, but more often it's just soothing, like this all will end soon.
 

Frosty

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I was fascinated with death growing up. Now I think about it sometimes, but not noticeably a lot. I dont know how often most people think about jt to compare, but Idk. I think about it sometimes.
 

Lexicon

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Honestly, I've seen so much death at this point, that I'd rather focus on life. I do deeply fear those I love who remain dying on me. I do what I can to prevent/delay that. But ultimately, I just focus on the now. We're here til we're not. That's it.
 

Julius_Van_Der_Beak

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I think about it frequently. I also roll my eyes at my thoughts on the subject a decade ago. Like, "Oh, that's so what a twenty-something person would think." Some of those thoughts are on this forum, and are among my many cringe posts.
 

The Cat

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Death is the natural state of life. The moment we go from shiftless characters trapped in the mad danse macabre of living in the book, to the pleasant perspective of reading the book again.
 
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