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  1. #1

    Default Getting out of office jobs

    I'm at a point where I've realised I need to move on from doing office jobs to something else. Currently, I have the nicest company and team, and good pay, but it doesn't help at all with the stress that sitting in an office alone with a computer for 8 hours a day causes. Being sick recently has lowered my tolerance for it, and it's been really obvious that it stresses my body even if I have simple work to do.

    I'd like to hear other ENFPs' advice and experiences, and what they found their happiness in when they escaped from sitting in an office at a computer.

    Btw, I have a background in electrical engineering, physics and patent law. So input from any ENFPs with a science or engineering background would be great.
    Freude, schöner Götterfunken Tochter aus Elysium, Wir betreten feuertrunken, Himmlische, dein Heiligtum! Deine Zauber binden wieder Was die Mode streng geteilt; Alle Menschen werden Brüder, Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt.

  2. #2
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    Considering your background I imagine it must be hard finding anything other than office jobs. ENFP's I've known hate 9-5 jobs and would prefer creative or social work instead. Good luck, I hope someone else comes with a valuable reply.
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by j.c.t. View Post
    Considering your background I imagine it must be hard finding anything other than office jobs. ENFP's I've known hate 9-5 jobs and would prefer creative or social work instead. Good luck, I hope someone else comes with a valuable reply.
    Thanks!

    Yeah, it took a long time to train my body to accept working an office job. I feel like I almost switch off part of myself to be able to do it, which probably isn't that healthy. When I end up in group discussions or mentoring people at work, I suddenly feel alive again.

    I've been thinking a more outdoor engineering or science in a team maybe? I seem to be more satisfied if I'm interacting with people and the world, and I'm solving things that make a positive impact. Unfortunately, specialised roles in a team where I'm only involved in part of the picture can sometimes be unsettling too. I tend to be more a generalist, which is less commonly sought after in most tech fields.

  4. #4
    Vulnera Sanentur Coriolis's Avatar
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    Have you considered teaching? That is dynamic, interactive, and you won't be in a cubicle behind a screen all day. Good STEM teachers are in short supply, at least in the U.S. (I assume you live here), and having real world experience you can share with students is a definite plus. Unfortunately you would probably need to get some additional training as actually knowing the subject is no longer enough, but if you are willing to invest 6-12 months and a little money, you could take care of this. Many states have abbreviated or accelerated training regimes for STEM teachers, due to the shortages.
    Though the ground was burnt and everything turned into ashes, we will revive again. The sky is still blue, the crashing waves from long ago are unchanged. This is Earth, our planet. This dream is in the hearts of people; so long as they do not abandon it, it will not fade away. For the sake of tomorrow, keep a song in your heart. For the sake of our future, let us stop our crying and stand on our ground firmly.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Have you considered teaching? That is dynamic, interactive, and you won't be in a cubicle behind a screen all day. Good STEM teachers are in short supply, at least in the U.S. (I assume you live here), and having real world experience you can share with students is a definite plus. Unfortunately you would probably need to get some additional training as actually knowing the subject is no longer enough, but if you are willing to invest 6-12 months and a little money, you could take care of this. Many states have abbreviated or accelerated training regimes for STEM teachers, due to the shortages.
    I'm in Australia actually 🙂

    I've considered teaching before and enjoyed teaching laboratory classes and tutorials at university. I'm not sure school teaching would be my cup of tea though. My mother was a school teacher, and I don't think it's for me. I'm pretty bad at disciplining kids and don't enjoy admin that much. At least with uni students I could joke and have a bit of fun with it if they were being silly. With school kids the parents would probably be complaining. 😄

  6. #6

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    I did some list writing (well actually a table), and it was quite revealing because I tick some boxes for science and miss on others, and I think that is where my problem is.

    If anyone has a career suggestion, let me know.

    Tasks with strong aptitude, fulfillment and enjoyment

    • Brainstorming
    • Practical problem solving
    • Mathematics
    • Innovation
    • Writing
    • Fixing things
    • Mentoring
    • Arguing current issues (politics, the world, environment, etc.)
    • Photography
    • Sport
    • Marketing (theory not in person)

    Music with poor aptitude, but lots of fulfillment and enjoyment.

    Tasks with aptitude but less fulfillment and enjoyment

    • Computer use
    • Computer programming
    • Scientific analysis
    • Some theoretical problem solving
    • Lab work
    • Computer modelling
    • Marketing in person

  7. #7

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    I get the feeling that I might be good on site in a project, problem solving in the heat of the action. Or as a sidekick to someone in a start up where things are moving fast and exciting things are happening. Somewhere where there are challenging problems to solve, but where I am out amongst it and there are lots of discussions on the fly. Not R&D or lab work where it is slow testing of things using computers.

    I find one of the hardest parts to be that I'm not just okay at my previous work in engineering, science and legal. I am actually really good at it and people really want me as an employee. It just drains something out of me. Still at the same time, I think I have a lot to offer intellectually and I hate to be on the sidelines. For example, I could never be a nurse because I'd want to be the doctor and diagnose. And I find I have to resist the urge to invent too much for my clients as a patent attorney. I'm guessing I'll be a really good and dedicated employee/team member if I have the right mix so I feel great too. I just have to figure out what offers that mix.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueScreen View Post
    I get the feeling that I might be good on site in a project, problem solving in the heat of the action. Or as a sidekick to someone in a start up where things are moving fast and exciting things are happening. Somewhere where there are challenging problems to solve, but where I am out amongst it and there are lots of discussions on the fly. Not R&D or lab work where it is slow testing of things using computers.
    Have you considered becoming a commissioning or field engineer in your field? Your preferences sound a lot like mine and I have chosen such direction.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lib View Post
    Have you considered becoming a commissioning or field engineer in your field? Your preferences sound a lot like mine and I have chosen such direction.
    How do you find it? I'm worried I won't be challenged enough in some field engineering jobs. Commissioning engineer could be interesting. I'll have to read about what areas I could be involved in with my background.

    I think I'm a scientist at heart, but I like to be out there exploring and engaging with the world and the universe.

    I like the idea of some outdoor science like geophysics or environmental physics, but I've never taken much scientific interest in rocks or plants or oceans though. I've always been more interested in space, innovation and pushing the limits of science and humanity. I got into physics because I loved astronomy and loved reading about everything beyond Earth. Like I could lie there for hours watching the stars. Almost started a PHD in astrophysics just before I got my patent attorney job, but it seemed like more computing than being truely amongst it (a general problem I've had with physics, the process is far less interesting than the answers). Maybe I could be an astronomer if they still exist

  10. #10
    Vulnera Sanentur Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueScreen View Post
    How do you find it? I'm worried I won't be challenged enough in some field engineering jobs. Commissioning engineer could be interesting. I'll have to read about what areas I could be involved in with my background.

    I think I'm a scientist at heart, but I like to be out there exploring and engaging with the world and the universe.

    I like the idea of some outdoor science like geophysics or environmental physics, but I've never taken much scientific interest in rocks or plants or oceans though. I've always been more interested in space, innovation and pushing the limits of science and humanity. I got into physics because I loved astronomy and loved reading about everything beyond Earth. Like I could lie there for hours watching the stars. Almost started a PHD in astrophysics just before I got my patent attorney job, but it seemed like more computing than being truely amongst it (a general problem I've had with physics, the process is far less interesting than the answers). Maybe I could be an astronomer if they still exist
    They do, but observations are largely automated now, so you are back to lots of computation. Still, there is probably hands-on work to be done, and yes, there are still degrees in astronomy. I was going to study that as well, but when I got to some of the physics prerequisites, especially the research side, I became interested in that and never looked back.

    Sounds like you need to do some research on possible careers. Relevant professional societies should have some useful information: APS, IEEE, AAS, etc. There is usually some on their websites, but they should also be able to put you in touch with people working in various jobs who can tell you what it is like. If there are student chapters at a local university, you can talk with them also.
    Though the ground was burnt and everything turned into ashes, we will revive again. The sky is still blue, the crashing waves from long ago are unchanged. This is Earth, our planet. This dream is in the hearts of people; so long as they do not abandon it, it will not fade away. For the sake of tomorrow, keep a song in your heart. For the sake of our future, let us stop our crying and stand on our ground firmly.

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