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Education Vs. Brainwashing

Cor Luctis

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It's brainwashing because most people have no interest to understand most of the things taught in school. Not trying to be condescending here - teachers themselves don't necessarily understand their subject. It's even worse - scientists/experts sometimes don't understand their subject, they only know stuff. For some people, it is education, for others it is brainwashing. Nobody can force you to think against your will, it would be unethical :D
Teachers often don't understand their subject. This is partly because American public education prioritizes training as a teacher (i.e. pedagogy) over education in the subject you are going to teach. Sadly, even many elementary school teachers are uncomfortable with science teaching. I'm talking about grades 3-5 here - relatively simple stuff that any adult should be familiar with. Education as a career does not attract our best students as a career, partly because pay is much less that in other careers, and partly because working conditions and expectations are unappealing.

As for scientists and other experts, they generally do understand their fields, but are subject to the vagaries of funding and politics. Many unfortunately allow their actions to be unduly shaped by these influences. It can be tough to hold the line on scientific integrity when your own career or funding is at stake.
 

Jaq

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Teachers often don't understand their subject. This is partly because American public education prioritizes training as a teacher (i.e. pedagogy) over education in the subject you are going to teach. Sadly, even many elementary school teachers are uncomfortable with science teaching. I'm talking about grades 3-5 here - relatively simple stuff that any adult should be familiar with. Education as a career does not attract our best students as a career, partly because pay is much less that in other careers, and partly because working conditions and expectations are unappealing.

As for scientists and other experts, they generally do understand their fields, but are subject to the vagaries of funding and politics. Many unfortunately allow their actions to be unduly shaped by these influences. It can be tough to hold the line on scientific integrity when your own career or funding is at stake.

Personally, I agree. I also think that distance learning is not that great at all. Mainly for the reason of access to teacher help. Any diligent student can research topics they're not understanding, but the teacher would know them better than some random video or website and SHOULD (not that they're always capable of doing so) be able to tailor how to help the student the best because of it. I would not expect lower educational grade students to be able to research.
 

Alice Unchained

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Teachers often don't understand their subject. This is partly because American public education prioritizes training as a teacher (i.e. pedagogy) over education in the subject you are going to teach. Sadly, even many elementary school teachers are uncomfortable with science teaching. I'm talking about grades 3-5 here - relatively simple stuff that any adult should be familiar with. Education as a career does not attract our best students as a career, partly because pay is much less that in other careers, and partly because working conditions and expectations are unappealing.

As for scientists and other experts, they generally do understand their fields, but are subject to the vagaries of funding and politics. Many unfortunately allow their actions to be unduly shaped by these influences. It can be tough to hold the line on scientific integrity when your own career or funding is at stake.
There are such struggles among scientists. I see some positives to it - not only external agendas influence science but it also works the other way around.

As a non-American I don't have experience with US public education but nowhere in the world teachers are paid adequately. To my knowledge. I explain this with the culture of overemphasis on taking or status, and underemphasis on giving.

I was talking broadly about education. No matter how much one improves and customizes the education system (trends I wholeheartedly support) there is always going to be a spectrum of literacy, interests, viewpoints and specializations. Nothing wrong with that. FTR, I am an opponent of ableism. Still, it is indisputable that students who are truly invested in learning, rarely are being or feeling brainwashed – the more knowledge one gets, the higher is the chance to spot inconsistencies or be open to change of mind.

Anyone can be a scientist if they know their narrow field, be methodological and secure funding, but it takes something extra to make a breakthrough discovery. Not to downplay the importance of different roles in science but there is a spectrum of scientific-ness.
 
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