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  1. #1
    ☦️ Senior Member ☦️ Isk Stark's Avatar
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    Default The Spiritual Crisis in America

    Some of you may have a kneejerk reaction to the url address. This isn't for you.

    We Don't Have Just A 'Mental Health Crisis' In America. We Have A Spiritual Crisis. - Red Pill Times

    It’s not just the attacks themselves that I find so disturbing. The way people react to them is almost as bad. We seem to treat this stuff like it’s not even real, like the people who died weren’t actual people. We carry on as though we’re living in a video game or something. As soon as the bodies hit the ground, we run to our battle stations and start fighting amidst corpses like vultures. There’s something so routine and lifeless and inhuman in the whole spectacle. Is anyone even really angry about these killings anymore? Or sad? Or anything? It seems like it’s just an excuse to bicker; flinging our dull talking points at one another before we get bored and have to wait again, longingly, for the next bloody slaughter to come along and give us something to gossip about for a day or two.
    I see this a lot on TypoC. Especially in the section which shall not be named. *cough*Politics*cough*

    There is a very troubling combination coming together. We dehumanize each other while medicalizing and politicizing evil. The result is indifference and detachment all the way around. Exactly the atmosphere where Satan thrives. It is the atmosphere of Hell itself, leaking like noxious fumes into our world. And there is only one antidote that really works. His name is Christ.
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  2. #2
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    I'm curious, how do you see your religion, and Christ informing your response to things like reactions to mass slaughter? Is prayer and witnessing enough? Or do you feel like Christianity asks more, and if so, what?

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    ☦️ Senior Member ☦️ Isk Stark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    I'm curious, how do you see your religion, and Christ informing your response to things like reactions to mass slaughter? Is prayer and witnessing enough? Or do you feel like Christianity asks more, and if so, what?
    For me, being a newer Christian, it’s not surprising that these things happen to this fallen world. I can pray. I don’t witness, personally.

    The only thing asked of Christians is to maintain the faith of His resurrection, show our brothers and sisters the love of Christ, and be charitable when/where we can.

    Have a great day.

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    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isk Stark View Post
    For me, being a newer Christian, it’s not surprising that these things happen to this fallen world. I can pray. I don’t witness, personally.

    The only thing asked of Christians is to maintain the faith of His resurrection.

    Have a great day.
    Hah, so curt. Anyway, I just saw this particular thread as a learning opportunity. Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    Hah, so curt. Anyway, I just saw this particular thread as a learning opportunity. Thanks.
    Just so you know I think everything that's been posted as "Christian" by this user is heresy, I'm happy to talk about it in PM if you'd like but I'm not conversing with them, I dont believe there is any point. Anyone who is into that whole red pill scene, there's no point at all.
    All for ourselves, and nothing for other people, seems, in every age of the world, to have been the vile maxim of the masters of mankind.
    Chapter IV, p. 448. - Adam Smith, Book 3, The Wealth of Nations

  6. #6
    blessblessblessblessing human garbage asynartetic's Avatar
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    I might have been on board or taken an interest until I saw the business about Christ being the "one antidote"

    I'll give it a read later. For now, can you tell me, is the author saying Christianity is the only viable spirituality system?

    Personally, I might see some relevance in Buddhism and Taoism (mind you, I'm not saying these are superior or better than Christianity, Kabbalah, or whatever other people choose as their spirituality aids)
    The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true. -Sagan

    Johari

    Nohari

  7. #7
    Innovation Reigns Supreme Hard's Avatar
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    I don't see a spiritual crisis; that isn't a collective thing. People can - and should - have their own personal spiritual convictions. The reason religion is a problem is because people are seemingly incapable or unwilling to tell when they need to keep it to themselves. It is also utterly hysterical to me when I hear cristians cry that they are oppressed in the US.

    Also, red pill times? Really?
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    Of course, being so relentlessly stupid and clueless, we still don’t understand what’s going on around us. We chalk it all up to a “mental health crisis,” as if there’s some mysterious mental illness spreading like syphilis throughout the land. Or we conclude that we just haven’t settled on the right combination of laws and regulations. We seem to ignore the fact that a great many of these mass killers had been on psychotropic medicines, and they either acquired their weapons illegally or they acquired them because the existing laws weren’t properly enforced (as was the case in Texas). We are already the most medicated and regulated civilization in human history, yet these things have only increased in frequency.

    Laws won’t heal the human spirit. Neither will prescription pills. We can’t treat moral corruption like we treat headaches. It’s not always a “chemical imbalancement” that propels a guy to murder women and children. Often, that desire is rooted much deeper, all the way down in the depths of his depraved and rotten soul.
    This is true. The supposed cure is the problem in the first place, because the problem is lack of humanity. Lack of recognition of our own humanity as much as other people's. Making mental health services more authoritarian and increasing gun regulation in order to stop mass shootings only works, both directly and indirectly, to increase the mass shootings that need to be stopped. If you don't believe in Christ or God or whatever, it's fine, but you need to believe in soul and life and and other life-affirming concepts. The nihilistic and solipsistic philosophy most people swear by is not just suicidal for the individual but genocidal for all of humanity, and yet everyone wonders why they're so miserable. You're miserable because you have no connection to life, and because you have no connection to life, you have no connection to truth or objectivity or anything else, so of course if life is meaningless, death becomes meaningless as well, and in that case apathy about human suffering is inevitable.

  9. #9
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    @magpie Huh, I'm actually a pretty happy nihilist, but I also believe in a life and love and protecting that which I find valuable AND I disagree on those particular policies you mentioned, and I'd love for life, greater and lesser, to continue in a healthy happy way. Life and living is pretty complex, there is no one truth, no one red-pill. From what I know, this is the most objective viewpoint possible, and scary, yes.

    It's very easy to vilify people who you disagree with.
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  10. #10
    ☦️ Senior Member ☦️ Isk Stark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magpie View Post
    This is true. The supposed cure is the problem in the first place, because the problem is lack of humanity. Lack of recognition of our own humanity as much as other people's. Making mental health services more authoritarian and increasing gun regulation in order to stop mass shootings only works, both directly and indirectly, to increase the mass shootings that need to be stopped. If you don't believe in Christ or God or whatever, it's fine, but you need to believe in soul and life and and other life-affirming concepts. The nihilistic and solipsistic philosophy most people swear by is not just suicidal for the individual but genocidal for all of humanity, and yet everyone wonders why they're so miserable. You're miserable because you have no connection to life, and because you have no connection to life, you have no connection to truth or objectivity or anything else, so of course if life is meaningless, death becomes meaningless as well, and in that case apathy about human suffering is inevitable.
    ^she gets it.
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