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What'cha Reading?

Saslou

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Feb 1, 2009
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Just finished Angela's Ashes. Awww.

Half way through Pride and Prejudice but struggling to pick it up and continue. I don't enjoy leaving books half read.
 

Viridian

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Dec 30, 2010
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Just finished the Scott Pilgrim series, all six volumes (but not in one sitting).

I guess it was a bit too "indie" for me, 'cause I was all :wtf: throughout the last volume. I can never quite tell when O'Malley is being serious and when he's being silly...

This means that it's time to add another series to my "Currently Reading" roster. Death Note it is! :D
 

Orangey

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Two months late, but what did you think of Fingersmith, Orangey? I liked that Sarah Waters tried to tackle the Dickensenian women myth and the empower the two main characters, but I thought her execution was flawed*, and the narrative was too slow (and repetitive).

*constantly victimizing them instead, and the narrative didn't really focus on how they got out of the cycle

Yeah, it was a little repetitive, and a lot of the time I found the detail tiresome. I never like it when I feel like I have to skip over whole paragraphs because I can't get myself to care about, for example, what the textures of the goddamn thistle bushes were like.

Agreed about the victimization of the main characters.
 

mrcockburn

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The Road to Serfdom by Hayek. After this book, I want to read one supporting the very opposite stance. (It's my own personal rule)
 

why-att

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Jul 14, 2011
Messages
6
Memoirs of a Geisha

This book is an enjoyable disappointment to me. I thought that it will be a little boring, but it's very readable and interesting, because it allow to look inside in a hidden world.

(Sorry for my English, I'm Hungarian.)
 

Lark

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Jun 21, 2009
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I'm reading Graham Masterton's The Wells of Hell, I read The Manitou and Devils of D Day by the same author, they're sufficiently different from one another and sufficiently similar too that I'm able to read them in a chain like that but I think I might read a different author and entirely different style next.
 

King sns

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(copy pasted from my blog- It's by Siddhartha Mukheerjee)

I would highly recommend the book "The Emperor of All Maladies"- a Biography of Cancer. It's brilliantly written so far from what I've seen and I've just picked it up. I've flipped through and looked at random pages and gotten something out of every paragraph I read. It's scientific at times, but also really well worded to suck the reader into the emotional aspects as well- it's not completely dry. I have a feeling I will get done quickly, I am absolutely enamored by the writing style and content. Pathology and disease combined with emotions connected to them is up my topic alley, so this could be biased- but it did win a Pulitzer prize, I don't appear to be the only one that loves this book.
 

King sns

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Memoirs of a Geisha

This book is an enjoyable disappointment to me. I thought that it will be a little boring, but it's very readable and interesting, because it allow to look inside in a hidden world.

(Sorry for my English, I'm Hungarian.)

That was one of my favorite books :) I couldn't put it down.
 

Orangey

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Wobblies and Zapatistas - Andrej Grubacic, Dennis O'Hearn.

The Trial of Henry Kissinger - Christopher Hitchens.
 

Lark

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Jun 21, 2009
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29,636
I read May Man Prevail by Eric Fromm and now I'm reading On Being Human, I'm running out of titles by that author to read, without learning Spanish or German that is, which makes me sad. I also got a book on philosophy by Karl Jaspers, which is strange and I'm reading in installments because I couldnt read it at once, his style and pace of writing is odd and I dont know if he's entirely unbiased either.

Besides that I'm reading Revenge of The Manitou by Graham Masterton and some comics, cheapo reprintings of Marvel comics in a small format, I've got the first appearence of Venom and The Hulk. I'm reading those books for the craic.
 
D

Dali

Guest
Just finished reading Tehanu; the fourth book in Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea Chronicles.

Let's assume someone served you the most delicious lasagne. You picked your way through the dish, savouring every bit of it, and with the last spoonful of it, bit into a whole peppercorn, the bitter taste of it flooding your mouth and ruining, or somewhat hampering, your enjoyment of the meal.

Tehanu is that peppercorn for me. I read the first three books during my spare time in a week, enjoying the beautiful characters, the otherworldy tone, the simple yet complex wisdom and the magic of it all; it was quite solidly high-fantasy fiction, in every way. Then, seventeen years after the third book, along came a gritty, introspective, real and bitter treatise on feminism and child abuse packaged as the final book in the high-fantasy series. The only things about Tehanu that linked it to the trilogy were the characters and the places within the book. She couldn't have penned it as a separate book; she had to have it ride Earthsea's coattails.

I always found those people who ranted passionately about filmmakers 'ruining their memories' of certain movies, with unnecessary remakes and sequels, to be a bit melodramatic but I now know exactly how they feel. I loved the Earthsea trilogy (I refuse to see this book as part of it) but find my recollection of it to now be somewhat tainted. Frankly, I'm quite mad and sad about it. :(
 
N

NPcomplete

Guest
Just finished reading Tehanu; the fourth book in Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea Chronicles.

Let's assume someone served you the most delicious lasagne. You picked your way through the dish, savouring every bit of it, and with the last spoonful of it, bit into a whole peppercorn, the bitter taste of it flooding your mouth and ruining, or somewhat hampering, your enjoyment of the meal.

Tehanu is that peppercorn for me. I read the first three books during my spare time in a week, enjoying the beautiful characters, the otherworldy tone, the simple yet complex wisdom and the magic of it all; it was quite solidly high-fantasy fiction, in every way. Then, seventeen years after the third book, along came a gritty, introspective, real and bitter treatise on feminism and child abuse packaged as the final book in the high-fantasy series. The only things about Tehanu that linked it to the trilogy were the characters and the places within the book. She couldn't have penned it as a separate book; she had to have it ride Earthsea's coattails.

I always found those people who ranted passionately about filmmakers 'ruining their memories' of certain movies, with unnecessary remakes and sequels, to be a bit melodramatic but I now know exactly how they feel. I loved the Earthsea trilogy (I refuse to see this book as part of it) but find my recollection of it to now be somewhat tainted. Frankly, I'm quite mad and sad about it. :(

I recently finished The Tombs of Atuan but I'm still working through other books before starting The Farthest Shore. The tasty description of Tehanu however makes me want to toss the other books aside and focus on the Earthsea books.

As to what I'm reading: "Le Petit Prince" by Saint-Exupery both in French and German, "My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales", and "In The Shadow Of The Master".
 

Orangey

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Just finished reading Tehanu; the fourth book in Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea Chronicles.

Let's assume someone served you the most delicious lasagne. You picked your way through the dish, savouring every bit of it, and with the last spoonful of it, bit into a whole peppercorn, the bitter taste of it flooding your mouth and ruining, or somewhat hampering, your enjoyment of the meal.

Tehanu is that peppercorn for me. I read the first three books during my spare time in a week, enjoying the beautiful characters, the otherworldy tone, the simple yet complex wisdom and the magic of it all; it was quite solidly high-fantasy fiction, in every way. Then, seventeen years after the third book, along came a gritty, introspective, real and bitter treatise on feminism and child abuse packaged as the final book in the high-fantasy series. The only things about Tehanu that linked it to the trilogy were the characters and the places within the book. She couldn't have penned it as a separate book; she had to have it ride Earthsea's coattails.

I always found those people who ranted passionately about filmmakers 'ruining their memories' of certain movies, with unnecessary remakes and sequels, to be a bit melodramatic but I now know exactly how they feel. I loved the Earthsea trilogy (I refuse to see this book as part of it) but find my recollection of it to now be somewhat tainted. Frankly, I'm quite mad and sad about it. :(

Now I'm interested.
 

prplchknz

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Jun 11, 2007
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Middlesex-I hated this book at first but 150 pages in it's growing on me, glad i stuck with it.
 

mmhmm

meinmeinmein!
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Jul 6, 2010
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watchmen.jpg


Watchmen

jock is reading this to me. we just finished chapter 3.
my favourite pane(?) in this chapter was dr manhattan
holding the bra. :>
 

Qlip

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I'm slated to read 'In Search of Lost Time' by Marcel Proust as part of my literary snob phase, but I've had the attention span of a gnat lately.
 
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