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  1. #11
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post
    SPACE.com -- Deformed Galaxies Confirm Universe's Acceleration

    Relative to deformed galaxies? Not sure if we're all using the term "acceleration" in the same context? But it's been a widely accepted topic in Astronomy for many...many years and a phenomena originally observed and speculated on by Hubble before any of us were born.
    He means that "space" as an entity, is not accelerating because there's nothing its motion is able to be compared against. Its expansion is. He was mostly referring to the accuracy of the thread title, I assume.



  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    We now know this is entirely wrong and the universe is not only expanding but the expansion is accelerating and the acceleration will not slow or reverse.

    And interestingly it was couple of Australian astronomers just down the road from me at the Stromlo Observatory, in Canberra, Australia, who made this discovery only recently.
    It'd be interesting to read a summary of their research. I'm not much of a detail person, I simply like to explore concepts.

    Even as the universe expands, galaxies merge...just as surely as the Milkway and Andromeda will evenutally become deformed.

    There's a lot yet to be understood about dark energy, and am quite fond of the Big Crunch theory...

    Simply because the outcome would be similar to flushing a giant toilet bowl.

  3. #13
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post
    It'd be interesting to read a summary of their research. I'm not much of a detail person, I simply like to explore concepts.

    Even as the universe expands, galaxies merge...just as surely as the Milkway and Andromeda will evenutally become deformed.
    Sure it is contest between gravity and the expansion of space. And the Milky Way and Andromeda will merge but remember, the expansion of space is accelerating and gravity is not accelerating, so eventually the expansion of space will take all matter not bound to us gravitationally out of sight over our event horizon. And then we will be completely, forever alone.

    And remember our event horizon is only 13.7 billion light years away.

    Early explorers feared that if they sailed too far they would tip over the edge of the world. Well, the event horizon is the edge of our world.

  4. #14
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post
    It'd be interesting to read a summary of their research. I'm not much of a detail person, I simply like to explore concepts.

    Even as the universe expands, galaxies merge...just as surely as the Milkway and Andromeda will evenutally become deformed.
    Every galaxy, generally, is moving faster and faster away from each other. There are some local deviations, but they are in the vast minority. Dark Matter is already more abundant than regular matter. And yet, the universe is expanding. The "big crunch" is unlikely.



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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    Every galaxy, generally, is moving faster and faster away from each other. There are some local deviations, but they are in the vast minority. Dark Matter is already more abundant than regular matter. And yet, the universe is expanding. The "big crunch" is unlikely.
    'big crunch' seems the most likely candidate to get back to a singularity?

    ***just for fun

    The term "big bang" started as a joke -- a derogatory remark made by astronomer Fred Hoyle. But the name stuck and spawned a series of nomenclature knockoffs. A universe that expands forever will yield a "big chill" or a "big freeze." A universe that collapses into a singularity and explodes outward again will experience a "big crunch" followed by a "big bounce." And a universe that reaches equilibrium and does nothing will become a "big bore."

  6. #16
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post
    'big crunch' seems the most likely candidate to get back to a singularity?
    Well sure. But the universe isn't headed back to a singularity. I don't know why think it is.



  7. #17
    Senior Member Snoopy22's Avatar
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    Wild guess, the further things become removed gravitational forces become less (just off the top of my head so no science involved).

  8. #18
    The Memes Justify the End EcK's Avatar
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    Relative to deformed galaxies?
    That doesn't even mean anything

    Not sure if we're all using the term "acceleration" in the same context?
    enlighten me, the dictionary guys'll want to hear that bit.

    But it's been a widely accepted topic in Astronomy for many...many years and a phenomena originally observed and speculated on by Hubble before any of us were born.

    I meant, its expansion is accelerating, not 'space', but the expansion of space.
    And thank you, I know all that already

    before any of us were born.
    Assumptions assumptions, young man
    Expression of the post modern paradox : "For the love of god, religions are so full of shit"

    Theory is always superseded by Fact...
    ... In theory.

    “I’d hate to die twice. It’s so boring.”
    Richard Feynman's last recorded words

    "Great is the human who has not lost his childlike heart."
    Mencius (Meng-Tse), 4th century BCE

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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    Well sure. But the universe isn't headed back to a singularity. I don't know why think it is.
    A hydrogen cloud sometimes collapses to become a star. There must be sufficient pressure, density, and heat obtained to initiate fusion of hydrogen nuclei to form helium nuclei. The energy formed in process of fusion is essentially a consequence of gravitational collapse.

    The gravatational collapse is a reversion from the high energy potential resulting from the big bang, essentially to a lower energy potential as matter returns locally to singularity.

    A. All energy formed in process of fusion is a consequence of gravitational collapse.
    B. Gravitational collapse is a reversion from the high energy potential resulting from the big bang as matter attempts to return locally to singularity.
    C. Will there be a gravitational repayment on the huge investment in outward momentum at the big bang?

    It's fun to think about, like pulling on a rubber band.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by EcK View Post
    Assumptions assumptions, young man

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