User Tag List

First 1234513 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 211

  1. #21

    Default

    hey if anyone bought the book do you think you could post INTP and ISTP descriptions...thanks

  2. #22
    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    691

    Default

    I watched the video. It was good. I really wanna get that book... and add it to the collection of books I'm never gonna read.

  3. #23
    Senior Member animenagai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    NeFi
    Enneagram
    4w3
    Posts
    1,573

    Default

    I know this is an old thread, but I personally think that it's one of the best posts ever on typeC. Just watched the video too, great stuff. I'm definitely a Christmas tree. When I was young I actually tried to stimulate every region of my brain through message, movement, meditation etc. It's good to know that turning them off can also be a good thing. Gotta work on that.
    Chimera of Filth

    A gruesome beast with dripping flesh
    Clings to me as a sick fixture
    My throbbing heart it gnawed apart
    It stalks and hunts me through mirrors

  4. #24
    IRL is not real Cimarron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Posts
    3,424

    Default

    Glad someone dug this up, I hadn't seen it.

    I thought this was going to be dumb...but on the contrary, it's amazing info to think about.
    You can't spell "justice" without ISTJ.

  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    What was that from the non-Ni users about the whole Ni association with mysticism being a crock?
    Anyone who would say that isn't working with a full deck, research or no. I have a Word document dedicated to musings and Ne gathered intell on this very phenomenon.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    Functions and Neocortex Activity:

    Introverted Feeling

    Fi types:
    • Are consummate listeners who listen in a holistic way.
    • INFPs can deeply listen for up to 10 minutes at a time, ISFPs listen briefly and then move to action.
    • Show high activity in T3 and T4, which handle language.
    • Carefully compose their own speech, attending to both content and delivery.
    • Show high activity in F8, and are stimulated by rankings of importance.
    • Show the least activity in interior regions that aid logic.
    • Rely on left-brained (Fp1) decision making.


    Extraverted Intuiting (Ne)

    Ne types:
    • Often show a "Christmas Tree" pattern.
    • Often experience creative highs.
    • Provide fast, creative responses (sometimes too creative) – lol yes
    • Find it difficult to get "in the zone," and can do so only after practicing and internalizing an activity over weeks, months, or years.
    • Use regions that support imagination.


    A "Christmas Tree" pattern is one in which the neocortex is active all over, each region is of high amplitude and out-of-sync with others. This pattern indicates cross-contextual thinking. This pattern is also very energy intensive, and may produce distractions and contradictions.

    INFPs may get to the core of a person's psychology by listening for so long. INFPs are less likely to defend their own views or take action, though when they stop listening, region Fp1 becomes very active as they make a strong (and perhaps final) decision.

    Based on Nardi's experiences, he would classify the strength of each functions as:

    Ne: Perceive and play with patterns of relationships across contexts.
    Fi: Listen with your whole self to locate and support what's important.
    Yeah, sounds like me allright.

  7. #27
    garbage
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    Fi: Listen with your whole self to locate and support what's important.
    By the way, this Fi "one-liner" description is probably the best that I've seen. (I wouldn't have noticed it if @mia_infp hadn't pointed it out.)

    I'm in the middle of the Google talk now. Good stuff

  8. #28
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sx/sp
    Socionics
    ILI Ni
    Posts
    17,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cimarron View Post
    Glad someone dug this up, I hadn't seen it.
    Same. Completely missed this.

    Please provide feedback on my Nohari and Johari Window by clicking here: Nohari/Johari

    Tri-type 639

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    By the way, this Fi "one-liner" description is probably the best that I've seen. (I wouldn't have noticed it if @mia_infp hadn't pointed it out.)

    I'm in the middle of the Google talk now. Good stuff
    Indeed to both.

  10. #30
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/so
    Posts
    1,565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dimane View Post
    hey if anyone bought the book do you think you could post INTP and ISTP descriptions...thanks
    The section on Ti in the second "spoiler" of the OP is most applicable (since that's as close to he comes discussions INTPs and ISTPs in depth in terms of his research).

    Here a couple of tidbits I didn't include in the Ti-section above:
    • Female Ti-types tend to be better listeners than male Ti-types
    • Male Ti-types have a hard time reporting back what was being said, when asked (they'd stopped listening and detached)


    And from what I remember from the workshop (so this will be my paraphrasing from fallible memory) INTPs, in particularly, tend to detach to logically process. In fact, some of the other EEG regions turned Green (which seems to indicat a dissociated state) while those inner logic regions (F3, F4 in particular for INTPs) were highly activated.

    Other workshop tidbits

    Other things pointed out at the workshop:

    • Introverts tend to use the same region when responding to people and objects; this was less true of extraverts.
    • While Nardi's book show's one kind of "universal" engagement curve, it actually appears to be different for Ns vs Ss (according to some later research). Ns are more engaged by novelty and tended to be more motivated at novel tasks. Ss tended to be less motivated as tasks become less practical or important (writing one's name backwards instead of forwards, for example).
    • SPs are among the best at recalling contexual detail, but only when a situation is interesting enough (SFPs, in particular, are great with detail when a context is emotionally charged).
    • Ni types can be great a coming up with answers seemingly "out of nowhere" and tend to be solid generalists, but their holistic, whole-brain strategy isn't particularly good at coming up with answers quickly under stress. They may enter their "Zen" state, only to return without an answer, resulting in freezing under stress as they try to force solutions to appear.
    • ESTJs can enter an INFP-like "in the zone" listening state, but only when listening to authority figures (sorry peers and underlings!).


    Si-types As specialists

    One interesting thing Nardi talked about was how Si-types (especially Si-doms) tend to be specialists that use role-models, repetition and practice to "burn in" specialized skills. In fact, they tend to show very modal patterns of brain activity, so that their brain patterns may be quite different in different contexts (at work vs at home, for example). He contrasted that with Ni-doms (like Nardi himself, an INTJ), who tend to be generalists that can (given enough background information and the right environment) simulate expert thinking.


    F8 (Fi?) and different types

    A final thing he pointed out was that those types show a lot of activity in F8 seem to use F8 somewhat differently. INFPs seem to use F8 mostly for positive valuations. ISFPs tend to use it for both positive and negative valuations. Most Te-types tend to use it for negative valuations.

    This made some sense to me, since it often seems like TJ deeply care about things when they are going wrong. It would help explain why TJs tend to see Fi (assuming F8 is a home to Fi) as largely dark and negative.

    On a related note, ISTJs and INTJs were the most easily irritated with spikes of very high activity in T4.

    T5 and different types

    T5, the region of the neocortex related to attending to social feedback and feeling ashamed/embarrassed, is used heavily by Fe types (and seems to be an obvious fit for at least some qualities we associate with Fe).

    Conversely, ISTPs tended to show the least activity in T5, with some ISTPs never showing any activity in the region no matter how embarrassing the situation in the lab. INTPs generally showed low activity in T5 as well. However, when that region finally activated for INTPs in the lab, it tended to spill over into neighboring speech and movement centers (which may be one reason why most of us, regardless of type, get clumsy and tongue-tied when embarrassed).

    T5 is also used by heavily by male FPs, but far less so by female FPs... but what does that mean (Nardi didn't speculate on that, that I recall)? Could it mean that male FPs tend to feel more socially constrained than female FPs (and so perhaps are less likely to be visibly quirky)? Do male FPs learn to blend socially for some reason (social pressure)?

    Of course, some studies have also shown that men tend to use T5 for facial recognition, which might explain a greater use of T5 in male FPs.

Similar Threads

  1. Cognitive Processes Test (Dario Nardi's 48 Question Test)
    By Mondo in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 629
    Last Post: 09-18-2017, 06:03 PM
  2. [JCF] Neuroscience of Personality - Dario Nardi
    By highlander in forum Typology and Psychology Book Reviews
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 05-24-2016, 09:30 AM
  3. Video: Authors@Google: Dario Nardi - Neuroscience of Personality
    By highlander in forum Typology Videos and RSS Feeds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-22-2014, 09:26 PM
  4. The pitfalls of personality typing, and the nascence of neuroscience
    By karmacoma in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-08-2013, 04:47 PM
  5. The Novelty of Personality Types
    By UnitOfPopulation in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-06-2008, 06:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO