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Thread: Gifted Children

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    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
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    Default Gifted Children

    A short list of facts about gifted children that seems to relate to the MBTI. My emphasis in curved brackets.

    • Gifted students (IQ 151 or above) are 29 percent more likely to have active imaginations than nongifted students (IQ less than 130)
    • Gifted girls are 55 percent more likely to have active imaginations than nongifted girls {imagination is a subcategory of the Big Five's Originality that relates to the MBTI's iNtuition (high Originality)}
    • Girls of both groups preferred making decisions on the basis of values rather than logic {more likely to be F types, nothing new}
    • Gifted boys are 28 percent more likely to prefer making decisions on the basis of values (rather than logic), as compared with nongifted boys {could gifted boys be more likely to be F types?}
    • Although more girls than boys prefer organized styles to a more flexible style, gifted students in general do not show a preference for -organization over flexibility {this refers to the Big Five's Consolidation, that relates to the MBTI's J vs P}
    • Gifted and nongifted students show no differences on measures of extraversion

    (This info comes from a book called the Owner's Manual for the Brain by Pierce J. Howard Ph.D.)

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    mrs disregard's Avatar
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    Where does that leave the people with an IQ between 130 and 150?

    C'mon Pierce.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    Where does that leave the people with an IQ between 130 and 150?

    C'mon Pierce.
    Okay, so I've got more to add and this stuff applies to children that are gifted (above 150) and moderately gifted (130-150).

    • A long attention span.
    • A preference for novelty
    • Overreactivity to physical sensations
    • A good memory for recognition of previous experience.
    • Early onset of language.
    • Intense curiosity, drive, and persistance.
    • Obsessive interests.
    • Metacognitive ability (that is, the gifted think about how they think and can talk about their learning and problem-solving strategies).
    • Typically, the ability to read one or two years before beginning kindergarten.
    • The ability to excel at abstract logical thinking.
    • A fascination with numbers and numerical patterns.
    • Typically, a more solitary or introverted nature.
    • A preference for older children.
    • Difficulty finding compatible peers of any age.
    • Twice as many social or emotional problems as average children.
    • A fiercely independent and nonconformist nature.
    • The ability to derive pleasure from work.
    • Positive self-esteem about their intellectual ability.

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    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Do you have any data on those with IQs above 150?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    Do you have any data on those with IQs above 150?
    That's what the first list is.

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    `~~Philosoflying~~` SillySapienne's Avatar
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    When researching giftedness, I came across a lot of interesting literature suggesting a strong correlation between certain MBTI types and giftedness.


    The Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children (MMTIC) was administered to 240 academically talented third through sixth graders. Type was compared to the norms of the MMTIC and to 345 eighth through tenth grade students of comparable ability who had been administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. The most common type was ENFP (Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perceiving), accounting for over 45% of the sample. The participants were more likely to be N and P than the normative group. Academically talented males were more likely to be Extraverted and academically talented; females were more likely to be Introverted. Large differences were found between the older and younger groups, with the younger students showing greater preference for Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, and Perceiving.


    Concerning the 16 personality types, there were differences between the gifted and the general high school students. The most common personality types were INFP, INTP, ENFP, and ENTP among the gifted adolescents (see Table 5), while the norm group showed ESFP, ENFP, ESTJ, and ESFJ as the most common types. INFP, INTP, ENFP, and ENTP types constituted almost 50% of the whole gifted sample compared with 19% of the normative group.





    SENG: Articles & Resources - Gifted kids at risk: Who's listening?

    http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/50/4/295.pdf
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    Rats off to ya! Mort Belfry's Avatar
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    Hearing about gifted children makes me feel horribly inadequate.
    Why do we always come here?

    I guess we'll never know.

    It's like a kind of torture,
    To have to watch this show.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainChick View Post
    The Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children (MMTIC) was administered to 240 academically talented third through sixth graders. Type was compared to the norms of the MMTIC and to 345 eighth through tenth grade students of comparable ability who had been administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. The most common type was ENFP (Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perceiving), accounting for over 45% of the sample. The participants were more likely to be N and P than the normative group. Academically talented males were more likely to be Extraverted and academically talented; females were more likely to be Introverted. Large differences were found between the older and younger groups, with the younger students showing greater preference for Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, and Perceiving.


    Concerning the 16 personality types, there were differences between the gifted and the general high school students. The most common personality types were INFP, INTP, ENFP, and ENTP among the gifted adolescents (see Table 5), while the norm group showed ESFP, ENFP, ESTJ, and ESFJ as the most common types. INFP, INTP, ENFP, and ENTP types constituted almost 50% of the whole gifted sample compared with 19% of the normative group.
    Those two data points suggest yo me that what IQ measured at that time (I am assuming they were both 80s) was very similar to proficiency of Ne use. Especially, since the INPs was more prevalent in the older population and it is hypothesized that the auxiliary develops later.

    But this data is different from what we find in what ImNotTooPopular's posts.
    A lot of possible reasons. What is the cut-off definition of gifted used in the sources?

    Still, I find throwing in the hypothesis of the time changing nature of what is required for success and natural tendencies (and the time changing nature of what is considered successful and what are picked out as tendencies), can mess with what people think they are measuring with psychometrics (whether it is "personality" or "intelligence"). Its rather amusing to watch psychometrics supporters flounder to defend the validity of their approaches.

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    I read further in that chapter in the book I first mentioned, and the author mentioned how sometimes giftedness isn't a matter of speed or ability of mental functioning, but of uniqueness of mental functioning. It wouldn't be surprising to find that NPs are more nearly unique in their thinking ability.

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