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The limits of western medicine?

Lark

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Jun 21, 2009
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What do you think are the limits of western medicine?

I was watching an episode of a TV series called Unwell in which some actual medical centre has a "holistic nurse and aromatherapist" who would come to patients after they have had major surgery and offer them essential oils.

Does anyone else think this is the twentieth century's version of snake oil sales men?
 

ceecee

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I think combining elements of eastern and western medicine is beneficial. Acupuncture, massage and acupressure, exercise like Tai chi, diet therapy...I don't really see how these things have a downside for a patient in themselves.

Essential oils are great and they smell really nice in a diffuser or homemade cleaning products.
 

Julius_Van_Der_Beak

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I think the concept of the Auryveda diet where foods are sattvic/tamasic/rajas is interesting... it's as though someone systematized the effect foods have on the mood. I think some of the stuff on Eastern tradition maybe has validity on the level of the link between body and mody, which are things that are very hard to verify using empiricism. I'm not saying that all the claims are valid, but I think there is something to some of them. Chakras are similar. If I'm in a state where I'm very aware of my body, I do notice that certain moods correlate with certain feelings in areas of my body that happen to be exactly where the chakras are supposed to be.

To me it just seems like some of this stuff is studying a different domain of knowledge than the kinds of things Western science is really good for studying. It's mapping out inner body sensations and what produces them. Undoubtedly some of the claims are dubious, but I haven't seen any literature from the Western tradition saying things like "when you're angry, you feel a heat in your solar plexus region" (coincidentally the third chakra which is associated with power and will). I get why that is with Western science, but I think knowing stuff about your own internal sensations and listening to what your body is telling you is really valuable.
 

Lark

Active member
Joined
Jun 21, 2009
Messages
29,639
I think combining elements of eastern and western medicine is beneficial. Acupuncture, massage and acupressure, exercise like Tai chi, diet therapy...I don't really see how these things have a downside for a patient in themselves.

Essential oils are great and they smell really nice in a diffuser or homemade cleaning products.

I agree those things are great but would I call them medicine? Nope.

What is acu-pressure like? Like massage? Have you tried acupuncture? I think I might try that some time after the pandemic.
 
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