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The Caveman Diet

Sahara

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The stone age diet: Why I eat like a caveman - Independent Online Edition > Health


One of the leading researchers in the field of Paleolithic eating and fitness is Loren Cordain, a professor in the health and exercise department of Colorado State University. He makes no bones about it: "The human genetic makeup is identical to that of Stone Agers. Those people were optimally adapted to the types of foods they could gather or hunt, and there's no evidence to suggest that modern humans are any different," he says.

According to Cordain, our modern diet, with its emphasis on refined cereals, sugars, vegetable oils and dairy products, was introduced in the "wink of an eye", with serious ramifications for our health. "The changes that have occurred in the Western diet are far too rapid. Our genes have been stable, but our diet has not."

In his book The Paleo Diet (Wiley), Cordain argues that the rot set in with the Neolithic (agricultural) revolution some 10,000 years ago. As farming took over the world, bringing with it new foods such as bread and dairy products, so our health and fitness declined. We got fatter, and shorter. Come the Industrial Revolution, things got even worse. "Neolithic, industrial-era and modern-era foods... underlie virtually all the chronic diseases of civilisation: coronary heart disease, hypertension, type-2 diabetes, gout, obesity, acne and breast, colon and prostate cancer," Cordain says.

The stone age diet: what to eat

* Rule of thumb: If you can't gather it from a bush or tree, or spear it, it's probably best not to eat it.

* What you can eat: Lean meat and fish. Fresh fruit and vegetables. Eggs. Dried fruit (without added sugar or vegetable oil). Nuts and seeds.

* What you can't eat: Sugars, grains (no oats, wheat, barley or rye, etc), beans, peanuts (a bean not a nut) and starchy vegetables (such as potatoes). Dairy products.

What do you guys think?

I am beginning to get really confused about what is good to eat and what isn't, what with so many conflicting reports, I just don't know what is GOOD food anymore.

I have this love hate relationship with food, more hate than love, I want to eat healthy and I have already found that breads, pasta and dairy make me feel really lethargic.

So I guess my question here is, is this one a good diet choice or not?
 

Natrushka

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After years of reading, researching and trying different diets or "ways of eating" I've come to the conclusion that what works for someone wont necessarily work for everyone. There are a few things that do seem to be universal, however.

1. Eat real food. If it comes in a wrapper, cellophane, a box, etc, don't eat it. Do your shopping around the outsides of the grocery store; where the fresh, unprepared food is located.

2. Eat a lot of green stuff; volume is what signals to your stomach, then your brain, that you're full. The paleo diet has some merit in this regard; if you fill yourself up on the foods listed above that are allowed, most of those foods aren't calorie dense. Three cups of lettuce vs 3 cups of potato chips...

3. Move. Lift weights, do HIIT - high intensity interval training - i.e, run, for brief spurts, like you're being chased by a lion. Not technically a diet, but a good part of any diet, IMO.

4. Avoid the foods that don't agree with you. I need to avoid corn, it messes with my water levels. My husband should (but doesn't) avoid gluten, he's got Crohn's. If it makes you feel uggy, then take that as a sign to stay clear. Certain groups of people (ethnicities) handle certain foods better and worse than others. So if you're an Eskimo, eat as close to how your ancestors ate, if you're French eat like... you get the idea.

5. Get some fish oil, or some fatty fish into you, ASAP. If this stuff does just a third of what the research claims it does it's worth the money.
 

Sahara

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3. Move. Lift weights, do HIIT - high intensity interval training - i.e, run, for brief spurts, like you're being chased by a lion. Not technically a diet, but a good part of any diet, IMO.

You know, I tried exercising about 6 months ago, not only did I find it difficult (I am so unfit lol) but I also threw up each time, is that normal?


4. Avoid the foods that don't agree with you. I need to avoid corn, it messes with my water levels. My husband should (but doesn't) avoid gluten, he's got Crohn's. If it makes you feel uggy, then take that as a sign to stay clear. Certain groups of people (ethnicities) handle certain foods better and worse than others. So if you're an Eskimo, eat as close to how your ancestors ate, if you're French eat like... you get the idea.

If your half and half then can you eat from both you reckon?


5. Get some fish oil, or some fatty fish into you, ASAP. If this stuff does just a third of what the research claims it does it's worth the money.

No arguement here, I love fish. :)
 

ptgatsby

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I hate the argument that just because we were unable to do something before it's bad for us now. The healthiest part of my day comes from the cereal I have in the morning (and yes, I use soy milk). I could eat a couple of bowls of that and have over 3/4s of the nutritional needs met. So much of what is considered serious medical conditions also come from our extended lifespan and less from diet and everything else.

A balanced diet is important. Eating too much sugar and fat is bad for you. Since this diet is balanced there is nothing wrong with it really... The logic behind it... eh... that's more painful. Natural will generally be better than processed, not because of the process, but the side effects of nutrient loss, filtering and preserving. Eating well is actually pretty simple... but it's pretty hard to do because it is rarely the most convenient option.

And as Nat says, there are specifics that won't be covered in any diet - allergies and such do play a factor.
 

Sahara

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I hate the argument that just because we were unable to do something before it's bad for us now. The healthiest part of my day comes from the cereal I have in the morning (and yes, I use soy milk). I could eat a couple of bowls of that and have over 3/4s of the nutritional needs met. So much of what is considered serious medical conditions also come from our extended lifespan and less from diet and everything else.

A balanced diet is important. Eating too much sugar and fat is bad for you. Since this diet is balanced there is nothing wrong with it really... The logic behind it... eh... that's more painful. Natural will generally be better than processed, not because of the process, but the side effects of nutrient loss, filtering and preserving. Eating well is actually pretty simple... but it's pretty hard to do because it is rarely the most convenient option.

And as Nat says, there are specifics that won't be covered in any diet - allergies and such do play a factor.


You know I can not actually start my day properly without a bowl of cereal with ice cold milk, I was using rice milk for awhile, as only the sweetened soya was nice, which kind of spoiled my aims of dumping sugar. :)

True though, deep down I know what is healthy to eat and what isn't, but day to day life makes it a harder option. Sandwiches on the go, ergo bread, I did try to make bread out of rice flour, but it just doesn't taste as nice.
 

Natrushka

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You know, I tried exercising about 6 months ago, not only did I find it difficult (I am so unfit lol) but I also threw up each time, is that normal?

It may be normal for you, it may not ;)

Chances are you did too much, too soon. Are you healthy? Have you been to a doctor recently and know that there is nothing that would prevent you from exercising? If you know you can, then start small. Walk before you jog (and take this for what it's worth, although it is coming from a former runner - don't run, it's horrible on your feet and knees), jog before you sprint.

If you do nothing now, then just moving around more is something. Park as far as possible from the store. Take the stairs. Dance to the music on your stereo.
 
O

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I think that, over time, your body will tell you what it likes. Pay attention to your cravings; pay attention to how different foods make you feel.

Lately when I'm hungry I've been thinking "meat and fruit...meat and fruit..." and consequently I'll eat a grilled pork chop and an orange, for example. Later on I'll want other things. As long as you don't go nuts on quantity, you should do just fine letting your body be your guide.
 

563 740

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You know, I tried exercising about 6 months ago, not only did I find it difficult (I am so unfit lol) but I also threw up each time, is that normal?

Sustained, high intensity exercise can easily make you throw up if you push it too far. I've yakked while bicycling with guys that were in way better shape than I.
 

Sahara

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It may be normal for you, it may not ;)

Chances are you did too much, too soon. Are you healthy? Have you been to a doctor recently and know that there is nothing that would prevent you from exercising? If you know you can, then start small. Walk before you jog (and take this for what it's worth, although it is coming from a former runner - don't run, it's horrible on your feet and knees), jog before you sprint.

If you do nothing now, then just moving around more is something. Park as far as possible from the store. Take the stairs. Dance to the music on your stereo.

No, I didn't go to the doctor, I am going for a check up next week as I booked a gym membership and wanted to be sure where I was at fitness wise. (bottom of the rung lol)



I think that, over time, your body will tell you what it likes. Pay attention to your cravings; pay attention to how different foods make you feel.

Lately when I'm hungry I've been thinking "meat and fruit...meat and fruit..." and consequently I'll eat a grilled pork chop and an orange, for example. Later on I'll want other things. As long as you don't go nuts on quantity, you should do just fine letting your body be your guide.

I get those cravings but find it hard to pin down what I want, I was bulimic for so long on and off through my life that now that I eat again (over a year now) I just fear all food lol. :blush:

Sustained, high intensity exercise can easily make you throw up if you push it too far. I've yakked while bicycling with guys that were in way better shape than I.

Ok, that's what it must have been then. I am choosing a more gentle approach this time, I went all out last time, threw up too often and quit.
 

Lateralus

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You know I can not actually start my day properly without a bowl of cereal with ice cold milk, I was using rice milk for awhile, as only the sweetened soya was nice, which kind of spoiled my aims of dumping sugar. :)

True though, deep down I know what is healthy to eat and what isn't, but day to day life makes it a harder option. Sandwiches on the go, ergo bread, I did try to make bread out of rice flour, but it just doesn't taste as nice.
You don't even necessarily need to use rice flour. Homemade bread is better for you than the typical storebought stuff. You're not loading your bread with preservatives or extra sugar.
 

Sahara

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You don't even necessarily need to use rice flour. Homemade bread is better for you than the typical storebought stuff. You're not loading your bread with preservatives or extra sugar.


I was trying a wheat/gluten free diet at the time, so many foods we eat have gluten and wheat in them, it was too difficult and expensive to keep up with anyway.

Now You have made me want a homemade bread hot sandwich. :happy2:
 

Tayshaun

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An interesting diet.

I think only people with inflammatory disease such as Crohn's, Ulcerative colitis or Ankylosing Spondylitis at an advanced stage should really give it a try. An amazing amount of people suffering from these diseases report complete remission of inflammation when sticking to such diets. For the moment, this diet, like so many others, does not have much validation from the medical world and fits in the box of alternative medicine (esp. when it comes to diseases like multiple sclerosis or disorders like autism).

I am not sure and rather ignorant about the subject, but I think one of the explanations for why this diet works is that when food is cooked at very high temperatures and molecules become denatured or when starch foods (read:gluten) which include such bacteria as Klebsiella Pneumoniae are eaten, more agents are likely to inflame the lining of the bowel leading to increased permeability of the gut wall to toxins, microbes, undigested food, waste or larger than normal macromolecules.
 

JAVO

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You know, I tried exercising about 6 months ago, not only did I find it difficult (I am so unfit lol) but I also threw up each time, is that normal?

Possible causes based on my own personal experience:

1. Dehydration
2. Exercising in the morning before eating
3. Exercising in the morning
4. Overheating
5. Doing too much, too fast, too soon

Edit: BTW, I think the caveman diet is bogus... Cow and chicken are a lot different than woolly mammoth and sabre-tooth tiger. :D The point about less-processed foods is a good one though.
 

Natrushka

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I get those cravings but find it hard to pin down what I want, I was bulimic for so long on and off through my life that now that I eat again (over a year now) I just fear all food lol. :blush:
.

Oh, take it easy and take it slow, Sahara. Eating disorders change the deal. :hug:
 

Wolf

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Actually, it's quite right. Want to feel good? Go read up on wild foods and go for a hike during periods when such things are available. Maybe bring a few modern goodies to help with like catching animals, and by the end, you'll be a happy human. Maybe bring another human for some human contact, too.

What happened? You ate stuff you would eat if it wasn't for the modern world giving us stuff that is bad for us. You lightly exercised.

Modern foods hijack our natural processes to exploit us. In fact, fat is good stuff, and so is sugar; we're programmed to love this stuff because it's good stuff. However, in the natural world your access to such things is not as simple as it is now, and the types you would have found then are better for you. You would get a lot of fructose, good fats, protein, vitamins, etc.

So, yeah, it sounds like a great plan. One I would adhere to if it was reasonable, and wanted to without anyone formulating a "diet" for it.
 

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I knew Sam had something going for him.

caveman1.jpg
 

Sahara

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An interesting diet.


I am not sure and rather ignorant about the subject, but I think one of the explanations for why this diet works is that when food is cooked at very high temperatures and molecules become denatured or when starch foods (read:gluten) which include such bacteria as Klebsiella Pneumoniae are eaten, more agents are likely to inflame the lining of the bowel leading to increased permeability of the gut wall to toxins, microbes, undigested food, waste or larger than normal macromolecules.

And yet they constantly tell us that you have to cook meat as much as possible to protect yourself from bugs that exist within the meat, or at least that was what they always told me, hence my aversion to rare steak and such.

Possible causes based on my own personal experience:


Edit: BTW, I think the caveman diet is bogus... Cow and chicken are a lot different than woolly mammoth and sabre-tooth tiger. :D The point about less-processed foods is a good one though.

:D Lol true true, I read that cow is a human creation to some extent, bred by humans, so yes not so natural.

Sabre tooth steak....hmmm :nerd:

Oh, take it easy and take it slow, Sahara. Eating disorders change the deal. :hug:

Thanks natrushka, I made a promise to myself last year that enough was enough, that I could eat, it was ok and sod what other people thought, so far it's going ok, but when I first started looking at food again I even thought a plate of steamed veg was fattening. :shock: I am past that now lol, I mostly just eat vegetables at the table, steamed, roasted etc, fish sometimes, eggs, very rarely meat, I am a vegetarian that sometimes needs to eat liver because of my anemia.:blush:

Actually, it's quite right. Want to feel good? Go read up on wild foods and go for a hike during periods when such things are available. Maybe bring a few modern goodies to help with like catching animals, and by the end, you'll be a happy human. Maybe bring another human for some human contact, too.

What happened? You ate stuff you would eat if it wasn't for the modern world giving us stuff that is bad for us. You lightly exercised.

Modern foods hijack our natural processes to exploit us. In fact, fat is good stuff, and so is sugar; we're programmed to love this stuff because it's good stuff. However, in the natural world your access to such things is not as simple as it is now, and the types you would have found then are better for you. You would get a lot of fructose, good fats, protein, vitamins, etc.

So, yeah, it sounds like a great plan. One I would adhere to if it was reasonable, and wanted to without anyone formulating a "diet" for it.

Yes, when you put it like that it just sounds like common sense.

Going by everyone responses about the puking after exercise thing seems I just over did it too quickly, which is why I am happier with the slow going things I have chosen for this year.

Yoga, gentle gym and cycling, maybe some swimming thrown in occasionally. This is the first year of all the kids being in education so I have some time each day for me. :party2:
 

Natrushka

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I mostly just eat vegetables at the table, steamed, roasted etc, fish sometimes, eggs, very rarely meat, I am a vegetarian that sometimes needs to eat liver because of my anemia.:blush:

Do you take a multi vitamin, Sahara? As a vegetarian you probably eat more soy than most, you'd want to make sure you're also getting enough iodine to keep it from messing with your thyroid (soy is a goitrogen but if you're eating enough iodine or getting enough from a supplement it's not a concern - enough, btw, is 150 mcgs a day if you consume soy once a day, 300 mcgs if you consume it more than once a day [you can get 75mcgs from a 1/4 teaspoon of iodized salt]). Most multivitamins contain sufficient iodine (and selenium, which can affect iodine use).

B12 might be something else to consider. Especially if you're feeling tired and / or forgetful. Unless specicially informed, anemia can be B12 related as well as iron. One of the main reasons for iron deficiency in the UK, aside from being a vegetarian, is tea consumption. Tea blocks the absorption of iron, so when you do eat that liver you might want to keep the tea away from it :)
 

Sahara

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Do you take a multi vitamin, Sahara? As a vegetarian you probably eat more soy than most, you'd want to make sure you're also getting enough iodine to keep it from messing with your thyroid (soy is a goitrogen but if you're eating enough iodine or getting enough from a supplement it's not a concern - enough, btw, is 150 mcgs a day if you consume soy once a day, 300 mcgs if you consume it more than once a day [you can get 75mcgs from a 1/4 teaspoon of iodized salt]). Most multivitamins contain sufficient iodine (and selenium, which can affect iodine use).

B12 might be something else to consider. Especially if you're feeling tired and / or forgetful. Unless specicially informed, anemia can be B12 related as well as iron. One of the main reasons for iron deficiency in the UK, aside from being a vegetarian, is tea consumption. Tea blocks the absorption of iron, so when you do eat that liver you might want to keep the tea away from it :)

Wow, I did not know that forgetful was part of it, I am very very very forgetful, or that tea affected it lol I drink about 20 cups of tea a day. :blush:

I take iron from the doctor, and it says don't drink milk for an hour before and after. My doctor is a crap doctor, wouldn't even accept that my son's behaviour disorder was aggravated by food when his school doctor put him on the candida diet.

I will buy some of the B12 and a multivitamin, I was just sticking with the iron ones.:)
 
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