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[Psychology Other] The Art of Speed Reading People (Paul D. Tieger, Barbara Barron-Tieger)

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  • Total voters
    3

Doomkid

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Apr 2, 2014
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160
This book cleared a lot of things up for me, however you have to be be patient in the beggining cause a lot of things you think you already know but it is always good to remind
 

highlander

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I read this while in the Russian River valley in northern California, sitting at the pool. I anticipated really great things from the book because of what it promised. It's about understanding people and predicting their behavior. The person who wrote it made her living reading people - selecting jurors for trials. By her admission, "My most important skill is my ability to see the pattern of someone's personality and beliefs emerge from among often conflicting traits and characteristics." She says it's a "skill that can be learned and applied with equal success by anyone - anytime, anyplace."

I read it all thoroughly when the book first came out, highlighting those things that are important, as I often do. I was disappointed in the book. I recently just re-opened it and looked at the content, wondering why I disliked it so much. It's not actually that bad. It's just that there are walls of text (well it's a book isn't it?) but there wasn't much organization to it. It had a somewhat rambling quality to it. I think there is a lot of interesting and useful content but I don't believe it is written in such a way as to impart practical direction for the person who is reading it. It's a bit of an unfair criticism I suppose because she provides lots of examples. I just had a hard time organizing all that information into a coherent framework that I could utilize or apply. Maybe there is decent content here. It could just be better organized.
 

1487610420

Permabanned
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Messages
6,436
I read this while in the Russian River valley in northern California, sitting at the pool. I anticipated really great things from the book because of what it promised. It's about understanding people and predicting their behavior. The person who wrote it made her living reading people - selecting jurors for trials. By her admission, "My most important skill is my ability to see the pattern of someone's personality and beliefs emerge from among often conflicting traits and characteristics." She says it's a "skill that can be learned and applied with equal success by anyone - anytime, anyplace."

I read it all thoroughly when the book first came out, highlighting those things that are important, as I often do. I was disappointed in the book. I recently just re-opened it and looked at the content, wondering why I disliked it so much. It's not actually that bad. It's just that there are walls of text (well it's a book isn't it?) but there wasn't much organization to it. It had a somewhat rambling quality to it. I think there is a lot of interesting and useful content but I don't believe it is written in such a way as to impart practical direction for the person who is reading it. It's a bit of an unfair criticism I suppose because she provides lots of examples. I just had a hard time organizing all that information into a coherent framework that I could utilize or apply. Maybe there is decent content here. It could just be better organized.

Write your own guide for it.
 

highlander

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Write your own guide for it.

I misunderstood what you said here at first I think - which is to write that practical guide. That would be an interesting thing to write about for somebody that has the expertise. I'm not sure if I do. In either case, between my job and my hobby of participating in the site here, I wouldn't have time for it. I would like to write more at some point on this stuff. Someday hopefully there will be time for it.
 

Eilonwy

Vulnerability
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Oct 12, 2009
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I read this while in the Russian River valley in northern California, sitting at the pool. I anticipated really great things from the book because of what it promised. It's about understanding people and predicting their behavior. The person who wrote it made her living reading people - selecting jurors for trials. By her admission, "My most important skill is my ability to see the pattern of someone's personality and beliefs emerge from among often conflicting traits and characteristics." She says it's a "skill that can be learned and applied with equal success by anyone - anytime, anyplace."

I read it all thoroughly when the book first came out, highlighting those things that are important, as I often do. I was disappointed in the book. I recently just re-opened it and looked at the content, wondering why I disliked it so much. It's not actually that bad. It's just that there are walls of text (well it's a book isn't it?) but there wasn't much organization to it. It had a somewhat rambling quality to it. I think there is a lot of interesting and useful content but I don't believe it is written in such a way as to impart practical direction for the person who is reading it. It's a bit of an unfair criticism I suppose because she provides lots of examples. I just had a hard time organizing all that information into a coherent framework that I could utilize or apply. Maybe there is decent content here. It could just be better organized.

Sounds like how I write. ;)
 

Serendipity

the Dark Prophet of Kualu
Joined
Mar 24, 2009
Messages
852
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RAD
I misunderstood what you said here at first I think - which is to write that practical guide. That would be an interesting thing to write about for somebody that has the expertise. I'm not sure if I do. In either case, between my job and my hobby of participating in the site here, I wouldn't have time for it. I would like to write more at some point on this stuff. Someday hopefully there will be time for it.

A suggestion; How about re-writing her book an a more organized way? I am sure you can fill the blanks as they come up.
Still, just a suggestion.

Personally I haven't read the book.
 

highlander

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Lol why does everyone want me to rewrite this person's book?
 

Elocute

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Lol why does everyone want me to rewrite this person's book?

Possibly because they think your type and previous writings have shown a degree of organization that would aid them, as well.

I don't think this woman has much to input aside from her own perspective, which is likely why it rambles. She's attempting to write about a topic that many a psychologist have pondered for years, eventuated in things like the MBTI. Her ability to "pick" people may just be the fact that jurors, like any person with a functioning mind, can be objective, especially when severe and controversial topics arise. There are similar books by CIA/FBI ex-professionals. These are the same people that have been found, scientifically, to be far short of thier "reading" ability, hence why a suspect is often examined by multiple people.
 

Verona

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I didn't really care for this book. It had a lot of stereotypes like you can tell if someone is a P if their hair is messy. I enjoyed their Parenting and Relationship book about type but this one just wasn't one of my faves.
 
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