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Humans have ‘untapped’ ability to regenerate body parts?

Totenkindly

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Humans have ‘untapped’ ability to regenerate body parts, scientists say

...researchers just published a new paper in the journal Developmental Dynamics that focuses on the differences between mammals and a very special species of salamander called the axolotl.

Axolotls are severe endangered in the wild but they still exist in captivity. They’re incredible creatures with the unique ability to regenerate a wide range of body parts. Sure, some salamanders and other lizards and amphibians are capable of regenerating something like a tail, but the axolotl takes that ability and turns it up to the extreme. Axolotls are capable of regenerating a tail, leg, and skin, but they’re also able to grow new lungs, ovaries, spinal cords, and even a fresh brain or heart if needed.

In studying what happens to a wound on a molecular level in both axolotls and mice, which are mammals that don’t possess such robust regenerative abilities, the scientists discovered something very interesting. They found that the immune cells that trigger a response after an injury, called macrophages, are the critical link to exploiting an animal’s ability to regrow body parts. More specifically, Godwin demonstrated that when an axolotl had too few of these immune cells to react to an injury, a missing body part couldn’t be regrown and a scar appeared instead. In mice as well as humans, macrophages trigger scarring rather than regeneration, but it may be possible to change that...
 

Julius_Van_Der_Beak

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So, that would be need for people who are amputated to regrow their limbs. It is interesting that we can regrow our bones, but not the rest of us.

By the way, axolotls are cool looking.

GettyImages-1058304880-c-0b54061-scaled.jpg
 

Lark

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I think I heard about this some time ago, also love the wee fish salamander guy.

Nano tech, regenerative medicine, gene therapies, reversing the aging process (or stopping it) are all things that interest me intensely I read a book on new investment opportunities in this area once which was really interesting as it was research and applications and it was happening now.

Science fantasy seemed to be science fact. Although much as I really wish I would live to see it I dont know that I will live to see regenerative medicine cure, for instance, diabetes or diminished lung capacity, such as I suffer from, because I expect the whole thing will be the preserve of the very few.

It'll be monopolized by wealthy elites and their legacies, its maybe been around for years, who is to tell? I definitely dont think it's likely to be the only suppressed technology, just the latest probably. Like when existing medicines and treatments are kept out of reach by pricing average people out of consuming them what hope this type of thing?
 

Jaq

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I remember reading about this years ago.
 
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