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Dario Nardi's Neuroscience of Personality

Seymour

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Dario Nardi recently published a book called Neuroscience of Personality. It contains his insights based on put a 20 sensor EEG on 60 college students of various types, and then having them perform various activities.

Since it includes both qualitative and quantitive research results, it's probably not definitive proof of type or type dynamics. Still, I think his approach is interesting and his book helps shed light on how type relates to activity in the neocortex.

Neocortex Brain Regions and Skillsets:

Detail under the spoiler:


Summary:

Fp1 Chief Judge: Focus on explaining, making decisions, noting errors, and screening out distracting information.
Fp2 Process Manager: Focus on process, either step-by-step for tasks, or open ended creative brainstorming, or both.
F7 Imaginative Mimic: Mirror others' behavior, pick up skills by observing others, and make imaginative inferences.
F3 Deductive Analyst: Follow a chain of logical deductions and backtrack to correct thinking due to reasoning errors.
F4 Expert Classifier: Accurately place concepts by testing them against many categories at once to find a best-fit.
F8 Grounded Believer: Evaluate people and activities in terms of like or dislike, and/or recall details with high accuracy.
T3 Precise Speaker: Focus on content of the spoken word, attend to proper grammar, usage, enunciation and diction.
C3 Factual Storekeeper: Easily memorize and execute steps of movement (dance steps, etc.), and/or recall facts.
C4 Intuitive Listener: Focus on voice tone and other affective qualities of sound. Speak in a holistic way to influence.
T4 Flowing Artist: Draw, paint, dance or otherwise use your body in a flowing, spontaneous, and/or artistic manner.
T5 Sensitive Mediator: Attend to how others respond to you and later your behavior to get more desirable results.
P3 Tactical Navigator: Integrate physical space, motion, and visual clues to move skillfully through the environment.
P4 Strategic Gamer: Weigh many pros and cons, risks and uncertainties at once in order to finesse complex situations.
T6 Purposeful Futurist: State what will surely happen in the future, and/or apply a symbolic meaning to a situation.
O1 Visual Engineer: Mentally rotate, measure, arrange, assemble and explode objects with a focus on functionality.
O2 Abstract Impressionist: Notice holistic themes, patterns, and relationships in photos, paintings, and similar images.


Functions and Neocortex Activity:




Based on Nardi's experiences, he would classify the strength of each functions as:

Se: Act quickly and smoothly to handle whatever comes up in the moment.
Si: Review and practice in order to specialize and meet group needs.
Ne: Perceive and play with patterns of relationships across contexts.
Ni: Draw upon to whole brain to realize an answer to a novel problem.
Te: Manager resources efficiently to quickly decide based on evidence.
Ti: Reason multiple ways to objectively and accurately analyze problems.
Fe: Evaluate and communicate values to enhance social relationships.
Fi: Listen with your whole self to locate and support what's important.


Overall, I found the book very interesting (including much of the material not summarized above). Perhaps the biggest takeaway for me was even though types did correlate to usage levels of various brain regions, one of the biggest surprises was how different types tended to use whole-brain states. Different types using different whole-brain techniques I found interesting.

It's also fun to look at Nardio's summation of the function of the various brain regions, and compare oneself to the sample he gives of one's type (more on that later). Nardi did find that members of the same type tended to use the same brain regions (even separate from whole-brain states).
 
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Thalassa

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I do T4 a lot (in terms of dancing, yes but in the aesthetic memory/beauty thing like constantly) but tend to want to capture it in words...which would be T3, which is doubly strange since some people don't even really use T3 and T4 is totally non-verbal.

That's pretty much the process of some of my creative writing, like I really, really want to capture moments, like "being there" in words. I would think this would be common in some poets and certain kinds of novelists as well as visual artistry or dancing.

I'd be fascinated to learn more about this.
 

Thalassa

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Scary accurate.

I don't want to ruin it for anyone else.
 

Xenon

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Amazing. I had no idea this was being researched! :banana::banana::banana:

Haven't read it all through (yet...naturally I just went right to the Ti stuff), but I noticed that so far this does not appear to support Lennore Thomson's theory that Pi and Je functions (and therefore J types) are primarily "left-brained", and Ji and Pe functions (and therefore P types) are primarily "right-brained". Of the functions that seem to be associated with certain areas, it looks like they tend to be distributed on both sides.
 

lunalum

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This is very cool..... I remember reading this perhaps in an earlier stage in another thread but I've lost where it is. I'd like to see where this goes and whether it really can link something so easily physically measurable to the individual weirdness that is personality preferences.

Yeah, the whole right and left brain thing isn't looking too good right now. The only one that seems to have a sidedness is the Te type (mostly left-brained). Fe might have a slight left tilt. Si, Ti, Fi are more or less mirrored across the hemispheres. And Se, Ne, and Ni are literally all over the place....
 

Seymour

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Amazing. I had no idea this was being researched! :banana::banana::banana:

Haven't read it all through (yet...naturally I just went right to the Ti stuff), but I noticed that so far this does not appear to support Lennore Thomson's theory that Pi and Je functions (and therefore J types) are primarily "left-brained", and Ji and Pe functions (and therefore P types) are primarily "right-brained". Of the functions that seem to be associated with certain areas, it looks like they tend to be distributed on both sides.

Well, describing people as "left brain/right brain" is pretty crude. Nardi does include a weighted chart of an individual of each type (who is presumably fairly characteristic of his or her type). If you squint at those, you can kind of make a vague case that J's are, on the whole, more "left brain." In fact, it's very striking how "left brain" the ESTJ and ESFJ charts look, for example. Conversely, the FPs look the most "right brain" (if not as clearly as the ESxJs look "left brain"). The others are less clear. Fe looks left-brain-ish. Ni doesn't seem to have a clear pattern (even though T6 on the right sounds perfect for some aspects of Ni), and while F7 (left side) seems favored by Ne, plenty of other types favor it, too. Si seems a lot about specialization, so seems difficult to make a left/right brain call... although it does seem strongly associated with T5 (on the left). Se seems kind of all over the place (typical!).

So, Thomson's characterizations (which were based on Niednagel's claim) seem sometimes correct-ish if you squint. Nardi does say that the Ni Zen-like state works best one problem at a time, while for Ne the Christmas tree pattern is all over the map producing associations. That makes the Thomson's left-brain/right-brain assignments understandable, since she was basing on Ni's "one problem at a time" nature, vs Ne's fire hose of associations.

I think the most surprising and interesting part of Nardi's claims is the whole brain strategies that seem to be characteristic of various functions. So, for example, Te is not only about efficiency, but it helps quickly make decisions with a minimal amount of energy expended. Conversely, Ne not only produces all kinds of associations (right and wrong), it's also extremely energy intensive. Kind of brings a meta-dimension to the idea of brain specialization.
 

Zarathustra

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Thanks for sharing this information, Seymour.

I really like Nardi; he's doing some interesting things.

Excellent write-up, as well. Did you do that all yourself?

***

A couple things I found very interesting:

1. Introverted Thinking (Ti)


:laugh:

Now there's proof!


2. Introverted Intuition (Ni)


What was that from the non-Ni users about the whole Ni association with mysticism being a crock?

***

Found this recent lecture given by Nardi at GoogleTalks.

[YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGfhQTbcqmA"].[/YOUTUBE]
 

INTP

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Blah i expected more from him, this is what i have gathered on functions of brain regions from some earlier studies(wrote these few months ago):

gIm8A.jpg


its pretty obvious how jungian functions place on these areas for the most part. some of the things in his study contradict common sense and some earlier smaller studies. like he doesent link f5 to Fe, wtf. i think he had too small study group or something, i mean 60 people and 16 types isnt all that much.
 

Seymour

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Thanks for sharing this information, Seymour.

I really like Nardi; he's doing some interesting things.

Excellent write-up, as well. Did you do that all yourself?

What I posted is mostly quotes, Nardi's bullet points, misc. paraphrasing and some other notes. There's lots of other material in the book, so I hope people that are interested will buy it.
A couple things I found very interesting:

1. Introverted Thinking (Ti)

Now there's proof!
That one cracked me up, too. It does explain a few work frustrations.
[...]Found this recent lecture given by Nardi at GoogleTalks.

Very cool! Thanks for posting that lecture.

Blah i expected more from him, this is what i have gathered on functions of brain regions from some earlier studies(wrote these few months ago):

its pretty obvious how jungian functions place on these areas for the most part. some of the things in his study contradict common sense and some earlier smaller studies. like he doesent link f5 to Fe, wtf. i think he had too small study group or something, i mean 60 people and 16 types isnt all that much.

It's entirely possible that his pool was too small or skewed in some way... yet things that seem obvious are not always true. He does address the size of his study... I'll see if I can find the quote when I get home. I had similar expectations, though: that Fe would be uniquely associated with strong T5 usage, Ni with strong T6, Fi with F8, etc.
 
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INTP

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I watched the google talk and lucky for me, he left out some things from his studies that i find quite essential(i was planning of doing similar stuff in the future), some that have already been studied and could be used on his model and some which would just make sense to measure if you know jung more than function definitions defined in some MBTI book
 

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I want you to know I enjoy this thread, but I stopped paying attention halfway through to make sure everything was relevant.
 

Barlwooh

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How come no new posts for two days?

I WANT EVERYTHING ON THIS MAN. I want every single study hes done on mbti posted to this thread, i want to know where he lives, the name of his dog, his preferred cerial, his... ANYTHING!

It's like? Mbti is interesting again! :bananachamp:
 

OrangeAppled

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This is really interesting, I just don't have anything interesting to contribute myself. I will say that I soooo want this book!

I mean, I can consider what I think applies to me & how it relates to INFPs, but that's just pure speculation on my part. Oh, what the hay....

Fi types:
• Are consummate listeners who listen in a holistic way.
• INFPs can deeply listen for up to 10 minutes at a time, ISFPs listen briefly and then move to action.
• Show high activity in T3 and T4, which handle language.
• Carefully compose their own speech, attending to both content and delivery.
• Show high activity in F8, and are stimulated by rankings of importance.
• Show the least activity in interior regions that aid logic.
• Rely on left-brained (Fp1) decision making.

INFPs may get to the core of a person's psychology by listening for so long. INFPs are less likely to defend their own views or take action, though when they stop listening, region Fp1 becomes very active as they make a strong (and perhaps final) decision.

ISFPs are attentive when others withhold information (like social feedback).
I can relate to the ISFP part a bit myself....I often notice what someone does not say as much as what they do say, and this proves informative.

Ne types:
• Often show a "Christmas Tree" pattern.
• Often experience creative highs.
• Provide fast, creative responses (sometimes too creative)
• Find it difficult to get "in the zone," and can do so only after practicing and internalizing an activity over weeks, months, or years.
• Use regions that support imagination.

A "Christmas Tree" pattern is one in which the neocortex is active all over, each region is of high amplitude and out-of-sync with others. This pattern indicates cross-contextual thinking. This pattern is also very energy intensive, and may produce distractions and contradictions.
I definitely relate to the "zone" aspect of this. I've gotten very mad at people who interrupt me when I'm in my creative "zone" (on a "high") because I have trouble getting back in.

I relate to aspects of many of the processes below, but when it comes to doing something vs over all mindset, then the bolded best sound like what I think my mindset amounts to. The italics are stuff I do but don't identify as "me". The strike-through is stuff I think I'm awful at.


Fp1 Chief Judge: Focus on explaining, making decisions, noting errors, and screening out distracting information. *I can't decide if this is defining or just something I do. I know I can come across as decisive & critical to some & obliviously go-with-the-flow to others.
Fp2 Process Manager: Focus on process, either step-by-step for tasks, or open ended creative brainstorming, or both.
F7 Imaginative Mimic: Mirror others' behavior, pick up skills by observing others, and make imaginative inferences.
F3 Deductive Analyst: Follow a chain of logical deductions and backtrack to correct thinking due to reasoning errors.
F4 Expert Classifier: Accurately place concepts by testing them against many categories at once to find a best-fit.
F8 Grounded Believer: Evaluate people and activities in terms of like or dislike, and/or recall details with high accuracy.
T3 Precise Speaker: Focus on content of the spoken word, attend to proper grammar, usage, enunciation and diction.
C3 Factual Storekeeper: Easily memorize and execute steps of movement (dance steps, etc.), and/or recall facts.
C4 Intuitive Listener: Focus on voice tone and other affective qualities of sound. Speak in a holistic way to influence.
T4 Flowing Artist: Draw, paint, dance or otherwise use your body in a flowing, spontaneous, and/or artistic manner.
T5 Sensitive Mediator: Attend to how others respond to you and alter your behavior to get more desirable results.
P3 Tactical Navigator: Integrate physical space, motion, and visual clues to move skillfully through the environment.
P4 Strategic Gamer: Weigh many pros and cons, risks and uncertainties at once in order to finesse complex situations. - * I do this with people problems, not impersonal strategies. I'm good at finding effective strategies for other people's emotional issues & relationship problems.
T6 Purposeful Futurist: State what will surely happen in the future, and/or apply a symbolic meaning to a situation.
O1 Visual Engineer: Mentally rotate, measure, arrange, assemble and explode objects with a focus on functionality. - * I do this with a focus on aesthetic harmony....
O2 Abstract Impressionist: Notice holistic themes, patterns, and relationships in photos, paintings, and similar images.
 
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Such Irony

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This is interesting. My strongest area would probably be F4: Expert classifier, which would seem to correlate with Ti.

My weakest areas are probably C3: Factual storekeeper and P3: Tactical Navigator
 
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CuriousFeeling

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Let's see, what I use:

Fp1 Chief Judge: Focus on explaining, making decisions, noting errors, and screening out distracting information.
Fp2 Process Manager: Focus on process, either step-by-step for tasks, or open ended creative brainstorming, or both.
F7 Imaginative Mimic: Mirror others' behavior, pick up skills by observing others, and make imaginative inferences.
F3 Deductive Analyst: Follow a chain of logical deductions and backtrack to correct thinking due to reasoning errors.
F4 Expert Classifier: Accurately place concepts by testing them against many categories at once to find a best-fit.
F8 Grounded Believer: Evaluate people and activities in terms of like or dislike, and/or recall details with high accuracy.
T3 Precise Speaker: Focus on content of the spoken word, attend to proper grammar, usage, enunciation and diction.
C3 Factual Storekeeper: Easily memorize and execute steps of movement (dance steps, etc.), and/or recall facts.
C4 Intuitive Listener: Focus on voice tone and other affective qualities of sound. Speak in a holistic way to influence.
T4 Flowing Artist: Draw, paint, dance or otherwise use your body in a flowing, spontaneous, and/or artistic manner.
T5 Sensitive Mediator: Attend to how others respond to you and later your behavior to get more desirable results.
P3 Tactical Navigator: Integrate physical space, motion, and visual clues to move skillfully through the environment.
P4 Strategic Gamer: Weigh many pros and cons, risks and uncertainties at once in order to finesse complex situations.
T6 Purposeful Futurist: State what will surely happen in the future, and/or apply a symbolic meaning to a situation.
O1 Visual Engineer: Mentally rotate, measure, arrange, assemble and explode objects with a focus on functionality.
O2 Abstract Impressionist: Notice holistic themes, patterns, and relationships in photos, paintings, and similar images.

Not sure if this is indicative of Ne or Ni or something else.
 

skylights

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i feel like 85% of my brain functioning is O1 & 2

Extraverted Intuiting (Ne)

Ne types:
Often show a "Christmas Tree" pattern. [...]
A "Christmas Tree" pattern is one in which the neocortex is active all over, each region is of high amplitude and out-of-sync with others. This pattern indicates cross-contextual thinking. This pattern is also very energy intensive, and may produce distractions and contradictions.

:rofl1:
 

TenebrousReflection

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These are the descriptions I related to the most in roughly this order.

F7 - Imaginative Mimic
C4 - Intuitive Listener
T6 - Purposeful Futurist (I disagree with the "purposeful" part of the description tho, its mostly subconscious for me)
P4 - Strategic Gamer
T3 - Precise Speaker
T5 - Sensitive Mediator

Have not watched the video yet, but I plan to...

Thanks for resurrecting this topic as I missed it when it was posted - that's a book that will be going on my shopping list.
 

Seymour

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I do highly recommend this book. Nardi has a new version that fixes some typos and makes a few other minor corrections. You can buy this book here and it's also available from Amazon here. The google video linked above is also a good resource.

I just got back from attending some a workshop given by Nardi, so I'll try to post some fun interesting tidbits over the next few days.

Anyway, to clarify about Fp2 a bit... the association with creative brainstorming is just talking about how it tracks where one is a process. So, for example, it will fire right before someone announces "I'm done" or "That's all I can come up with" when brainstorming. (Brainstorming seems more associated with the holistic Ne-ish "Christmas tree pattern" than any particular brain region.)

Otherwise Fp2 is more associated with openness to novelty and (perhaps contrary) new information. It also seems more associated with egalitarianism than Fp1; Fp1 tends to be associated with seeing oneself as important and effective, and with filtering out distracting and negative information.

In a way (and this is my summary, not Nardi's), Fp2 seems more about processing interrupts and other out-of-band data, and Fp1 seems to be better at focus and filtering other data out.
 
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