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  1. #31
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    I think the problem lies in the misconception that thinking types can't have strong feelings. I can see how having strong feelings and being female can lead one to think that she's a feeling type. Thinking types aren't any less likely to experience feelings (even strong ones) than feeling types. The only distinction between the two is that thinking types have a stronger tendency to repress/suppress their emotional side in favour of what's rational and logical, whereas feeling types tend to make judgements and decisions based on feelings. In fact, the more you try to repress an instinct the more it will come back in full force.

    This reminds me of the french movie Un Coeur En Hiver (A heart in winter). The lead character represses his emotional side to the point where he doesn't think it exists but it's clear that he's still very much affected by it. It's a movie worth watching.
    Last edited by nerdy anthropoid; 09-04-2019 at 08:18 AM.
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  2. #32
    bechimo rav3n's Avatar
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    Feelings functions aren't emotions oriented. They're values oriented decision makers, whether internal or external values. This is likely what's messing people up when they're attempting to type themselves.

  3. #33
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    A co-worker recently made an astute observation. She said, "I think about my feelings."
    I had to laugh because I do the same thing! I am not naturally in touch with my feelings,
    so I have to think about my feelings and ask myself what am I feeling and why, etc.

  4. #34
    Macabre Reputation Thestralis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    A co-worker recently made an astute observation. She said, "I think about my feelings."
    I had to laugh because I do the same thing! I am not naturally in touch with my feelings,
    so I have to think about my feelings and ask myself what am I feeling and why, etc.
    Same here, though I rarely bother to ask the question, and when I do, it is hard to get a coherent answer, like trying to identify a specific person in a very blurry photograph.
    They are quite gentle, really, but people avoid them because they are a bit . . . different.
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Herring View Post
    It is probably also useful to distinguish between feeling emotions and feeling in the sense of having feelings about things/people (or strong values). I can and do feel emotions, strong ones sometimes, but I seldom have strong attachments to ideas, values or people.
    What you're describing is sentimentality. Do you mean that thinking types don't have that?

  6. #36
    bechimo rav3n's Avatar
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    As far as women battling an NT typing, as a generality, I haven't noticed this. More common would be 'F' females and especially males, mistyping themselves as NTs.

  7. #37
    Macabre Reputation Thestralis's Avatar
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    I have seen more cases of men battling an NF typing than women with NT.
    They are quite gentle, really, but people avoid them because they are a bit . . . different.
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  8. #38
    Senior Member Tina&Jane's Avatar
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    I think it would lean more towards doubting than actively battling against being NT because of the reasons @nerdy anthropoid said

  9. #39
    Senior Member StrawberryBoots's Avatar
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    My preference is fact-based decision making. No battle.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thestralis View Post
    I have seen more cases of men battling an NF typing than women with NT.
    I agree. For reasons I'm not privileged to understand more completely, this plight of misaligned thinking styles versus sex is slightly different for men.
    For the sake of comparison (though different context), this is similar to gender dismorphia: 1) culturally accepted gender roles and behavior are mismatched, and 2) typical hormone systems related to styles of thinking and behavior (serotonin, testosterone = thinking, intuition/dopamine, estrogen = feeling, creativity) are misaligned with sex. The women I have known that lead with extroverted thinking, for instance, are quickly labeled in contrary terms by their peers for their brusque, decisiveness, but over time warm up to them once they realize more lies beneath the surface, so to speak. Similarly, men whose behavior is misaligned with traditional concepts of masculinity have blended social status, mispronounced as either gender through labeling. These male and female archetypes however, as solid as they seem, erode quickly when their distinctive separateness is only determined by physiology, and made ubiquitous (and irrelevant) when those gender roles are fractured and performed by both in equal terms. But for the sake of argument and in the context of gendered behavior, men historically own testosterone-driven thinking and reinforce it within institutionalized masculinity as ideology: where individuals that measure up short in this competition are demoted to effemininity. With women though, rational or logical thinking does not make a woman any less of a feminine woman, to parse words.

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