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  1. #11
    Glycerine
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    Don't worry about particular MBTI functions. Good written communication doesn't necessary have much to do w/ the functions you use. IMO, all types can write effectively if they consider audience, purpose, tone: be it academic writing, letters, occasional forum posts, etc. If you have those aspects controlled, then you are good to go.

  2. #12
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    ^ indeed, it is studied, a learned skill, and perfected through practice.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  3. #13
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    Write out your central ideas as they come to your mind. For example in an e-mail, write the body of ideas you want to communicate first. "Te" them to your heart's content.

    Then, frame these ideas top and bottom with the tone. "Fe" your e-mail, if you want to call it that. Make the Fe - Te - Fe sandwich.
    Most excellently presented, PB!



    I see this ... it can be fatiguing. That's why you need to partner them rather than suppress the Fi. Channel them together to help fuel your energy. I know, I have historically been a champion Fi squisher too. But I am getting better and better at letting my Fi partner equally ... letting it be "grown up".
    What?! Doesn't this imply an acceptance of the "childish" analogy?!


    No, it needs a deep inhalation and then you can find the vocabulary to polish Te without feeling the need to gratingly switch gears. Give yourself space to do it with words ... to slow down your verbal communications.
    This is key.

    Your usual style, Oro, is: "idea idea idea idea idea idea idea!!!" You write your thoughts as you think them. There is nothing wrong with doing so and it helps organize thoughts much better. You're asking what the next step is to communicate better, and the next step is to take what you just wrote, and EDIT IT.

    It isn't that hard. Before, you only had a bunch of ideas that you needed to write down before you forgot them all. Now they're all written down. You won't forget them. You can read them and reabsorb them.

    What will happen when you read what you wrote is you'll notice a lack of Te-style organization. The ideas are coherent, and are mostly linked together, but it reads like extemporaneous speech. You'll have written something like

    A1-B1-C1-D1 B2-D1-B4-D1-C4-D4-C2-D1-B2-D1 C3 D3-D2 A4-A3-A2

    You'll have a bunch of ideas all jumbled up. I can immediately look at this and read "oh, A thru D, as applied with 1-4," and think, "Cool! I like that." But you'll notice, it's missing ideas, such as "B3", repeating ideas such as B2 and D1, and the order is all over the place. My Ni superpowers translate it readily.

    What you do next is read through your ideas and see how they connect together. You already know the connections: you traversed them to find the ideas. You see the patterns and you know what it all says. But now it needs some organization, Te-style.

    There are several ways to organize, depending on what you're trying to do. A couple of obvious ones are "A1-B1-C1-D1, A2-B2-C2-D2, ..." and "A1-A2-A3-A4, B1-B2-B3-B4". Another one is "Well, you understand ABCD, right? Well, I think this is linked to 1234, like so: A1-4, B1-4, C1-4, D1-4. This leads me to conclusion E." I.e., you read your ideas, and in the reading, you realize there's a more significant message you intend to say, so you summarize everything you've written, and highlight the new idea.

    Now, having organized it, removed repetitions, added missing elements, and perhaps incorporating new ideas, you read what you wrote. You read it as if you were a moderator on a forum. Look for the personal attacks. Look for the statements that imply others are stupid or uncaring. It should mostly be a presentation of ideas, a discussion of how to implement a process, a list of related facts that make a compelling statement. It should not be a list of faults, grievances, or various expressions of emotion (those get carefully inserted, later, as needed). You'll probably find lots of extraneous stuff you said that has nothing to do with your main ideas. Either find its relevance and include it, or simply edit it out: tangents get in the way of effective communication.

    Now that you have an effective presentation of ideas, then use the "Fe wrappers" PB mentioned. After removing the obviously emo things from your writing, many otherwise impersonal statements can be construed negatively, especially if it is, for example, factual statements of a group's performance that might be regarded as excessively critical. The Fe wrapper will usually say something like (in business speak, assuming business communications): "We are currently <here>. <Here> is a very strong position, but we can make it much better. Let me show you some facts ..." <insert your highly edited text> "... As you can see, we can end up with E, if we reorganize in this A-D 1-4 pattern. The benefits include <blahblahblah> ..."

    If you're thinking in terms of forum posting, it might be more like this: "I like how you said '<quote>' and '<anotherquote>'. You make a lot of sense, here. But when I read '<quoteyoudidnotlike>', I found it rather jarring, and not in sync with these ideas." <insert your highly edited ideas> "So I think I can agree with you in a limited sense, but given the context, I think <myidea> makes more sense with what you're saying."

    How to use Fi and Te together to do this:

    You don't need to quell Fi as you mentioned. It's still relevant, it still motivates you to speak in the first place. In fact, it's what you'll really be using to "Fe-sandwich" your main message. Let your Fi-side express itself, and let your Te-side organize that expression so that the expression is relevant to the message. You appreciate others, naturally: express that appreciation when discussing a topic near and dear to them. You have an enthusiasm for your ideas: show that enthusiasm in context, and others will hear your ideas more clearly.

    Perhaps you have an Fi->Te nuclear blast ready to unload. As PB said, take a breath, let your Fi process things for a bit, write down your ideas but don't click Send or Submit. As you get things written down, as your thoughts take concrete form, your Fi side will start understanding things from a broader perspective, incorporating your Te and Ne insights as you've written them down and analyzed and reorganized them. Instead of a blast, you can focus your Fi like a laser beam by using Te -- not to hurt, but to focus on real problems instead of destroying the good along with the bad. Fi knows what is right and wrong, Te prioritizes and implements it.

    You might be curious, for comparison's sake, as to how this differs from what I do when I write posts and emails? Well, Ni, being introverted, does a bunch of what I mention above all in my head. Ni often already has that "E" message in place, figures out the organization of the thoughts, and all that's left is to fill in the blanks with appropriate words. I usually only move or delete a paragraph or three. However, I still spend a long time reading and rereading what I wrote, combing through for errors, inadvertent nonsense, gaffs, and so on. I typically spend 30-60 minutes writing a post. I don't just see a post, type-type-type a response in a minute or three, and hit submit. Instead, I read a post that invokes a response from me. I spend a lot of time before typing figuring out what it is I want to say, what I want to focus on. Then I start typing, at which point my ideas are mostly crystallized. After typing it out, I edit like crazy.

    And the only reason this post is this long is that I'm explaining all of this in detail, with examples and thoughts to keep in mind, rather than focusing on the primary message of "write down your thoughts, organize them, reread and edit until you are satisfied with the message, and only THEN click send." It really is that simple. If you click Send within 15 minutes or so, you haven't edited enough.

  4. #14
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Most excellently presented, PB!
    Thank you I submit that the same compliment applies here to you as well. You have expanded this extremely well.

    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    What?! Doesn't this imply an acceptance of the "childish" analogy?!
    Stop teasing me now, because the error is treating Fi as a child. The initial assumption is the issue. I still don't always succeed here myself...

    Any function that presides over the others and seeks to rule solo can become a most uncomfortable dictator.

    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    If you click Send within 15 minutes or so, you haven't edited enough.
    Agreed. E-mails aren't written, they are crafted. On an important e-mail for example, one where I need my message completely understood and where I want to ensure that the e-mail elicits the exact response I desire, one hour, even two, is not uncommon. Perhaps that seems like a long time to you... Trust me, it's well worth the investment. I'll even create an Executive Summary (a couple of sentences) to preface everything if the e-mail will take more than 5 minutes to read. I don't like wasting my time afterwards cleaning up misinterpretations and conjecture. And, the longer the e-mail, the chances increase dramatically that no one will even bother to read and understand.

    Often I will wait a day, review and refine even that, condense and make more concise. There's always something that catches my eye.

    And if you're annoyed when writing something, step away from the computer and don't click that send button for at least 2 or 3 hours! Put it in the drafts; don't even insert the addressee in the "To" field to guarantee you don't accidentally send it.

    Re-read it, again, and again after lunch, even again the next day is best. Your language choices will often jump out at you then when the heat of the moment has passed. Your ideas will crystallize further and you'll eliminate charged phrasing, until there is no mistake at your meaning and in the logic of your plan.



    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    I typically spend 30-60 minutes writing a post. I don't just see a post, type-type-type a response in a minute or three, and hit submit.
    Yes ... that.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  5. #15
    One day and the next Rainne's Avatar
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    I find reading more (ex: a novel before going to bed) expands your vocabulary, which in turn improves your writing as you can more accurately convey what you want to say.

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