User Tag List

First 123

Results 21 to 27 of 27

  1. #21
    Lord Grumpus Tellenbach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    I'm thinking of removing some rotten wood trim around the windows and doors. Should I invest in an oscillating Dremel Multi-Max tool or should I get a rotorazer (compact circular saw)?
    Fact checkers find that Tellenbach is right 99.98% of the time on Mondays between 2:00 am and 2:01 am and 100% accurate when he's sitting on the toilet at all times.

  2. #22
    Senior Member anticlimatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    2,203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tellenbach View Post
    I'm thinking of removing some rotten wood trim around the windows and doors. Should I invest in an oscillating Dremel Multi-Max tool or should I get a rotorazer (compact circular saw)?
    Both are great tools. The Dremel is more versatile best used for precise work, though it is slow cutting and can numb your hands with the vibration. Circ-saws are quick and cut straight, but are best used when you can get the board completely off for bench cutting.

    I’d say if you want to leave the trim on while you cut out the rot, go with the dremel. But if you can pull the trim with a hammer and pry bar and replace with new that you cut to size nearby before mounting, go with the circ. Since trim comes off relatively easy compared to other wood situations, most carpenters would go with the later approach, but if you had both tools you would likely find yourself using the dremel far more often- on drywall, crafting projects, and various other things that need to be cut.

    If you do pull all the trim and find yourself needing to cut 45 degree angles for the corners, I recommend getting a miter box and a hack saw as shown:



    Both should be fairly cheap additions to the project.
    Likes Tellenbach liked this post

  3. #23
    Senior Member mgbradsh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Posts
    318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tellenbach View Post
    I'm thinking of removing some rotten wood trim around the windows and doors. Should I invest in an oscillating Dremel Multi-Max tool or should I get a rotorazer (compact circular saw)?
    I have the rotorazer and a Fein Multimaster (not the Dremel). The rotorazer is faster and easier to use, but it makes a big mess and you'll likely end up with some drywall repairs. The Dremel will be slower, but more accurate.

    If I have to choose between the two, I'd probably pick the Rotorazer. It has a lot of uses, or at least I got more use out of mine than I did the Fein tool or a regular Dremel that I have.
    ”Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal."
    Likes Tellenbach liked this post

  4. #24
    Remember, Humanity. Jacques Le Paul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    379 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    How long was trade school?
    Always forward, never back!

    "I always love talking to people and hearing their story. People always have a good life story to tell ya know?"

    Today is the beginning, and tomorrow is the beginning of everything else.

    March on, life's too grand to let things get you down for long. It's a beautiful place and we're so blessed to be here.

    I am a person of fortune and I must seek my fortune.


    My blog

  5. #25
    Senior Member anticlimatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    2,203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jacques Le Paul View Post
    How long was trade school?
    I think it's fairly short, but other than learning the various codes and regulations for the various trades it can be skipped completely (unless you want help passing the license tests instead of just studying the text book yourself). In the same way elective classes effectively fill out the bulk of any standard degree, hands-on apprenticeship experience hours fills out the bulk of the requirement for trade licenses. If you apprentice through unions (easiest way for outsiders to get an in), they do classes I think like twice a week or so, and hands on work the rest of the time. A private company will just work you, and let you do schooling however works best for you (and them).

    For instance, the only schooling I did was those two days a week when I was with the local electrical union (initially thought electrical was the way I wanted to go, but pivoted after I got to know it better), and a couple seminar-like classes hosted by our local plumbing inspector just to help me with the journeyman and master exams in the months prior to it, after accruing the experience hours necessary.

  6. #26
    Remember, Humanity. Jacques Le Paul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    379 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anticlimatic View Post
    I think it's fairly short, but other than learning the various codes and regulations for the various trades it can be skipped completely (unless you want help passing the license tests instead of just studying the text book yourself). In the same way elective classes effectively fill out the bulk of any standard degree, hands-on apprenticeship experience hours fills out the bulk of the requirement for trade licenses. If you apprentice through unions (easiest way for outsiders to get an in), they do classes I think like twice a week or so, and hands on work the rest of the time. A private company will just work you, and let you do schooling however works best for you (and them).

    For instance, the only schooling I did was those two days a week when I was with the local electrical union (initially thought electrical was the way I wanted to go, but pivoted after I got to know it better), and a couple seminar-like classes hosted by our local plumbing inspector just to help me with the journeyman and master exams in the months prior to it, after accruing the experience hours necessary.
    What trade did you learn?
    Always forward, never back!

    "I always love talking to people and hearing their story. People always have a good life story to tell ya know?"

    Today is the beginning, and tomorrow is the beginning of everything else.

    March on, life's too grand to let things get you down for long. It's a beautiful place and we're so blessed to be here.

    I am a person of fortune and I must seek my fortune.


    My blog

  7. #27
    Senior Member anticlimatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    2,203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jacques Le Paul View Post
    What trade did you learn?
    I learned electrical, mechanical (heating systems), and plumbing. Carpentry I already knew (it's easy and it smells good, but it can be boring/repetitive). Electrical involves a lot of algebra, and plumbing is mostly like playing with legos on the rough construction side- but there are many ways to specialize within each trade, which is where you get to make the most money.

Similar Threads

  1. Ask an INTP anything?
    By CognitiveLiberty in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 117
    Last Post: 10-02-2016, 09:15 PM
  2. [E9] Ask a 9 anything!
    By Enygmatic in forum Enneatypes
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: 03-10-2016, 07:11 AM
  3. [SP] Ask an ISFP anything
    By avaxtskyr in forum The SP Arthouse (ESFP, ISFP, ESTP, ISTP)
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 12-23-2015, 03:58 AM
  4. Ask an ENFP anything
    By Lunar Light in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-26-2015, 08:00 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO