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  1. #21
    Junior Member punkermit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    As you gain experiences and get to know yourself and shape the world around you, you become a version of yourself that is more "mature". However, wether or not the mature version of yourself is a more balanced personality cognative function wise or a very cognative extreme is entirely up to you.

    Although maturity tends to imply wisdom and balance from the average perspective, it doesn't have anything to do with it. Who says becoming more balanced and well rounded is the best course of action? Other peoples judgements are of course not without meaning but ultimately it is up to your own judgement what is best for you.


    So to answer OP. Define "healthy" personality.

    Personally, I don't like the idea of fading away by means of cognative ignorance.
    In Myers Briggs' terms, I would say healthy means the person shows relatively little weakness associated with their MB type.


    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Deadpan View Post
    Depends on how much you let life fuck with you.
    I tend to think on the same track.

    If a person has experienced many undesirable outcomes that they believe their personality's weaknesses play a part, they are perhaps more likely to reflect and make changes.

    On the other hand, if a person has always been able to relatively successfully conquered obstacles relying on their personality's strength, they are maybe less likely to feel the need to change. In their old ages they might appear to be a more exaggerated version of their youth.

  2. #22
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    Not necessarily. Many people do as growing as a person takes time. But some people don't accomplish that much as far as growth and are stuck in the same dilemas and problems their whole life.

    I suspect my nearly 90 year old paternal grandmother is an ISFJ (she's definitely an I type though). If it was true that people became more healthy versions of their type as they age, she would theoretically be a much healthier ISFJ. She has never truly addressed her rough (and I suspect traumatic) childhood, accepted herself for who she is and the circumstances she came from (it's rather obvious) and her own issues with mental health/depression/drug addiction/alcoholism. I honestly think she has, if anything, regressed with age from what I can gather. She may have early stage dementia, but I have reason to believe she's been regressing long before that developed.
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  3. #23
    Member GruffyBear's Avatar
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    A lot of what happens to you as you age is based on the choices you make. You spend the first 20 years give or take being conditioned to be a certain kind of person. In adulthood you take on more of that yourself. You're both Pavlov and the dog (of course others never stop trying to condition you as well). If you only interact with people when you have to and always view it going in as an imposition and a negative experience, odds are you aren't going to become a mellower, more balanced Introvert.
    There's come value to the loss of interest in what others think that comes with age (as well as the realization that everyone is just making it up as they go). That can take you in good or bad directions, once again, up to you.
    Of course, life can throw curveballs that will radically change your personal evolution, no matter what choices you make your life's trajectory is going to be altered if you experience a tragedy, a divorce, a surprising revelation, etc. We aren't defined by our choices alone.
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  4. #24
    Junior Member punkermit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LucieCat View Post
    Not necessarily. Many people do as growing as a person takes time. But some people don't accomplish that much as far as growth and are stuck in the same dilemas and problems their whole life.

    I suspect my nearly 90 year old paternal grandmother is an ISFJ (she's definitely an I type though). If it was true that people became more healthy versions of their type as they age, she would theoretically be a much healthier ISFJ. She has never truly addressed her rough (and I suspect traumatic) childhood, accepted herself for who she is and the circumstances she came from (it's rather obvious) and her own issues with mental health/depression/drug addiction/alcoholism. I honestly think she has, if anything, regressed with age from what I can gather. She may have early stage dementia, but I have reason to believe she's been regressing long before that developed.
    Interesting you mentioned ISFJ.

    The ISFJ in my life is experiencing some regression too. She used to be very popular and successful during her younger years due to her high J and her F made her personable and likable. She always lacked introspection and patience but it didn't seem to hammer her before.

    Now as she is getting on in years, her health not what it used to be, her influence diminishing. Her high J, which used to give her the competitive edge, is manifesting in the form of control issues. She still has strong ideas on how things should be done but she no longer has the energy to accomplish them herself and neither does she have the influence or the control to make others do them on her behalf. It is weighing on her psyche terribly and damaging her health.

    What makes one could be the same trait that breaks one.
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  5. #25
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    I feel like they get more complex, which is a plus to a people watcher like me, but not necessarily healthier or better.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    I feel like they get more complex, which is a plus to a people watcher like me, but not necessarily healthier or better.
    What you mean to say is that "This is not even your final form"?

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