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  1. #11
    Exception Finder Luminous's Avatar
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    I wonder if OCD and anorexia would make a person more likely to type as a J, since they are largely about control.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amberiat View Post
    Personality disorders often affect empathy, especially NPD and ASPD (Narcissistic Personality Disorder and Antisocial Personality disorder aka sociopaths/psychopaths) therefore making it near impossible if not impossible to accurately type someone.

    Depression messes with empathy as well although not as badly as the disorders listed above and there is medication to consider too.

    Personality disorders can loosely resemble certain stereotypes for example look at the ENTP/ESTP sociopath stereotype or the ENTJ/INTJ narcissist stereotype which are thrown around all the time when these types are being discussed. Of course they aren't accurate, and trying to type people with certain disorders isn't going to be accurate either.
    Interestingly enough, ASPD has been significantly correlated with the NTP profile while NPD has no significant correlation to any type.

    https://www.uccs.edu/Documents/dsega...ures-JPT-2.pdf
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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by bechimo View Post
    Interestingly enough, ASPD has been significantly correlated with the NTP profile while NPD has no significant correlation to any type.

    https://www.uccs.edu/Documents/dsega...ures-JPT-2.pdf
    That's pretty interesting! I definitely think ENTP is the best correlation at least for the smarter/more calculated individuals who suffer from ASPD but ESTP/ISTP seems to fit the average ASPD profile much more accurately, young criminals who get caught fairly easily, unpredictable, extremely impulsive etc.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amberiat View Post
    That's pretty interesting! I definitely think ENTP is the best correlation at least for the smarter/more calculated individuals who suffer from ASPD but ESTP/ISTP seems to fit the average ASPD profile much more accurately, young criminals who get caught fairly easily, unpredictable, extremely impulsive etc.
    There's no significant correlation with STPs and ASPD.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by bechimo View Post
    There's no significant correlation with STPs and ASPD.
    Your average STP acts very similarly and has many shared traits with your average psychopath, it's blatantly obvious if you observe enough STPs in real life. Even the usual STP profiles sound pretty much like they're describing someone who suffers from ASPD.

    If real, observed behavior isn't significant then what is?
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  6. #16
    Senior Member Smilephantomhive's Avatar
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    Mental illness only makes it impossible to type if it's based off stereotypes.
    "Avoid getting too preoccupied thinking about what you’re going to do, to actually do it."
    — Rachel Wolchin

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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amberiat View Post
    Your average STP acts very similarly and has many shared traits with your average psychopath, it's blatantly obvious if you observe enough STPs in real life. Even the usual STP profiles sound pretty much like they're describing someone who suffers from ASPD.

    If real, observed behavior isn't significant then what is?
    Personality disorders are groupings of specific traits where magnitude defines pathology or not. The traits for most personality disorders are normal human behaviours.

    ESTPs and ENTPs are different. Otherwise, they'd be one type.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Yuu's Avatar
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    I don't know if this is really relevant but sometimes I think that the opposite also happens. For ex; everyone I was raised by is a strong S. Everything had to be planned ahead ( to a "T") everything had to be done "The right ( traditional) way.
    I am VERY "N" my greatest skill is adaptation, thinking on my feet. My family considered this a mental disorder I recall my Grandfather once screaming ' NON WORKS THAT WAY!" They made me see all kinds of therapists and special ed counselors and had me tested for just about everything.

    This leads me to believe that many disorders are really just an extreme opposite of common perspectives ( not all of course)

    Of course there is also projection. If someone constantly tells you something you will either begin to believe it or will fight it to the point of obsession which can lead to it's own litany of mental problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by bechimo View Post
    Personality disorders are groupings of specific traits where magnitude defines pathology or not. The traits for most personality disorders are normal human behaviours.

    ESTPs and ENTPs are different. Otherwise, they'd be one type.
    ESTP's exasperate me. ENTP's I tend to get along very well with.
    "It's a good day to die, Valhalla! Who wants some blue potato chips?"

  9. #19
    Don't touch me. Peter Deadpan's Avatar
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    I didn't realize (accept) until recently that I've been depressed for years. I've also struggled on and off with social anxiety for years, randomly becoming a social cripple at the most inopportune times.

    I thought I was INFx for several years, but I think it's probably not that simple in my case. Just because you introvert often doesn't mean you are an introvert. I was essentially creatively and socially stunted for years without being fully aware of it.

    Ultimately, I have shit Si, to the point where it's laughable. When I get really depressed, I completely withdraw into Si and it's nothing but hopelessness and an almost palpable sense of dying on a soul level.

    Also, people of my tritype are EXTREMELY prone to mental illness or even borderline personality disorder as 4 and 5 are emotionally polar opposites and 8 throws in a tendency to lash out or be rebellious/stubborn. To put it simply, it's a very contradictory combination. Our "kind" is also painfully aware of the depths of darkness present inside all of us and we can see it in others easily, sometimes too easily.
    dead·pan
    /ˈded,pan/
    adjective: deliberately impassive or expressionless.

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯


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  10. #20
    Luminosity 2.0 Loona's Avatar
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    I think type is hard enough to discover without mental disorders. Those just add a whole other layer (or a thousand layers) of confusing. Some I'd imagine would distort type entirely, such as DID. I don't think I'll ever know what my "real type" is because my depression dates back to probably childhood. But at the same time, I also think that disorders can make typing even easier if you know what to look for. For example, someone who is clearly having a bad time may look like an unhealthy version of their inferior function much more so than what you would typically think of for their dominant type.
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