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View Poll Results: When the Children of the Future Ask: "Who Did You?"

Voters
31. You may not vote on this poll
  • Voting for the candidate I have had in mind since the beginning.

    6 19.35%
  • Voting for a different candidate than I originally intended.

    7 22.58%
  • Undecided

    1 3.23%
  • Election: leaves me embarrassed & need to take a shower

    9 29.03%
  • Alternate (not described above or live elsewhere)

    8 25.81%
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Thread: 2016: F It

  1. #1
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Default 2016: F It

    F in this case stands for FEELINGS


    Where are you with this election?


    Want to rant? Sad? Discouraged?


    It's November 9th and you are jubilant/disappointed?


    Let's hear it!

  2. #2
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    I'm voting for Jack Sparrow.

  3. #3
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    I've taken an interest in this election. Because it matters. More so to the US users, but the results will impact us all.


    But, in the past week I have started to have feelings, rather than just thoughts


    Embarrassment. Shame that humanity is currently expressing itself in this manner.


    People who feel strongly for their candidates are put in the position of 'girl-next-door dating an a**hole'. Trying to explain 'why their person is not so bad if you really knew them'.


    This is the Leader of the World Empire! Who 'sets the tone'!


    Seriously, can we not BE better than this? I'm getting feedback from people overseas about how North American is becoming perceived and it isn't pretty! What will the repercussions be


    I hope we don't get inured to 'this' as a new normal.


    WHERE are the issues that matter to the citizens among all the hijinks?


    Sadly, more and more voters are responding with apathy.
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  4. #4
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crabs View Post
    I'm voting for Jack Sparrow.
    Surprised he's not running
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    Surprised he's not running
    Democracy on the High Seas: How Pirates Rocked the Vote

    Sure, they did their fair share of burning and looting. But who knew pirates were ahead of our Founding Fathers when it came to good governance?

    Everyone knows that swashbuckling types aren't exactly known for obeying the rules. But years before the United States gained its independence, democracy was actually thriving aboard pirate ships. Perhaps that's because they reasoned that a little law and order was better than the alternative. Crammed aboard a ship with 300 unruly sailors, pirates were quick to adopt a government rather than let anarchy ensue.

    Democracy Now

    Of course, why they chose democracy as their form of government is another matter. As it turns out, buccaneers were leery of absolute authority. Many were escaped slaves or indentured servants who'd suffered under the tyranny of plantation owners in the Caribbean. Others had served under iron-fisted ship captains, who were rarely held accountable for their abuses of power. So, pirates settled on a form of government that recognized the individual without putting too much control in any one person's hands—democracy.

    For a mob of mostly illiterate seadogs, their concepts of governing were pretty evolved. Typically, they divided authority into three branches, complete with checks and balances. The captain, who only ruled absolutely in times of battle, was the executive branch; the quartermaster, who arbitrated disagreements and doled out punishments, was the judiciary; and the entire crew served as the legislature, voting on matters of importance, such as when to attack other vessels and when to elect a new captain.

    Another surprise? The crew could be more merciful than you'd expect. Once captains were voted out of office, they could be left at port or deposited on a deserted island. But they could also be reintegrated into the crew.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post

    I hope we don't get inured to 'this' as a new normal.


    WHERE are the issues that matter to the citizens among all the hijinks?


    Sadly, more and more voters are responding with apathy.

    I think that this is probably exactly what is going to happen since the system is moving in that direction for years. In other words in many different countries this is what you can see: the mass media create the illusion of only two blocks. However both of them present horrible candidates all the time in order to discourage voters, while third parties are being ignored by the media. However from time to time the system invents some horrible/totalitarian third party candidate just in order to fortify the two main blocks. Therefore only hardcore fans and establishment people get out to vote and they choose the candidate that will give them direct material benefits.

    Some refer to this as "privatisation of democracy".
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  7. #7
    Senior Member asynartetic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crabs View Post
    Democracy on the High Seas: How Pirates Rocked the Vote

    Sure, they did their fair share of burning and looting. But who knew pirates were ahead of our Founding Fathers when it came to good governance?

    Everyone knows that swashbuckling types aren't exactly known for obeying the rules. But years before the United States gained its independence, democracy was actually thriving aboard pirate ships. Perhaps that's because they reasoned that a little law and order was better than the alternative. Crammed aboard a ship with 300 unruly sailors, pirates were quick to adopt a government rather than let anarchy ensue.

    Democracy Now

    Of course, why they chose democracy as their form of government is another matter. As it turns out, buccaneers were leery of absolute authority. Many were escaped slaves or indentured servants who'd suffered under the tyranny of plantation owners in the Caribbean. Others had served under iron-fisted ship captains, who were rarely held accountable for their abuses of power. So, pirates settled on a form of government that recognized the individual without putting too much control in any one person's hands—democracy.

    For a mob of mostly illiterate seadogs, their concepts of governing were pretty evolved. Typically, they divided authority into three branches, complete with checks and balances. The captain, who only ruled absolutely in times of battle, was the executive branch; the quartermaster, who arbitrated disagreements and doled out punishments, was the judiciary; and the entire crew served as the legislature, voting on matters of importance, such as when to attack other vessels and when to elect a new captain.

    Another surprise? The crew could be more merciful than you'd expect. Once captains were voted out of office, they could be left at port or deposited on a deserted island. But they could also be reintegrated into the crew.
    Native Americans were also ahead of the founders. Many of our North American democratic traditions were observed by people like Franklin and stolen borrowed from nations such as the Iroquois. What we have is a unique blend of Greco-Roman Democracy/Republicanism, English Common Law/Parliamentary Gov't, and Native tradition.

    I have also wondered if the more authoritarian, centralized Powhatan monarchy played any role in influencing South-Eastern American culture and government in the early years of the republic...

    Antebellum southern society somewhat resembles feudal europe.

  8. #8
    Senior Member tinker683's Avatar
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    Not voting for my original pick, but given the alternative, I'm quite fine with that.

    This election frightens me because of all the nastiness and raw horror it's bringing to the foreground. I've been watching it escalate for the past 15 years that I've been allowed to vote but it's getting to levels where I genuinely fear for the future of my country.

    The only solace I take right now is that the man who is in many ways the personification of the last 15 years of bile and vitriol being allowed to be preached over radio and television airwaves is sinking in the polls and finds a new way every week to self-immolate himself. That gives me hope that even though many of my fellow citizens are (in most cases justifiably) angry, they haven't taken leave of their senses.

    But...it's a long ways to go before the election, there's a lot that could happen, and I've met many who are willing to make the perfect the enemy of the sane.

    So I'm just casting my vote...and staying out of the "conversations", and hoping for the best.
    "The man who is swimming against the stream knows the strength of it."
    ― Woodrow Wilson

  9. #9
    Senior Member asynartetic's Avatar
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    I may not vote this year.

  10. #10
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    We tend to think of just two parties here even when there are third parties involved. IOW, if a third-party would provide some dominance, one of the current two parties would basically lose power -- the two essentially swap roles. So we still would have a two-party system in terms of effect.

    The impression I get talking to my friends overseas is that they have many parties in some circumstances, and the parties typically cobble out coalitions on different issues; they seem to think more in terms of a multi-party system at a base level. So they don't really get why we have just these two parties that are now polarizing and why there is nothing in the middle.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft
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