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  1. #1
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Default EVERYone is a Racist

    I truly believe that everyone is a racist. NOT in the noun form:

    noun
    noun: racist; plural noun: racists
    1. 1. 
a person who believes that a particular race is superior to another.


    But, rather in the adjective form:

    adjective
    noun: racist; plural noun: racists; adjective: racist
    1. 1. 
having or showing the belief that a particular race is superior to another.



    I have no problem admitting I am racist at times. It would be disingenuous not to. I usually am surprised when it’s brought to my attention, but it exists all the same.


    I thought that I was more ‘colour-blind’ before someone from Asia married into our family. It’s been a huge learning curve. If you want to see firsthand what racism exists locally or in your own family, marry or date someone from a different race than your own.


    It doesn’t mean you burn crosses or make disparaging comments. It can be as simple as expectations, finding another culture bizarre or having in-culture preferences.


    My family prides itself on being diverse and our first lesson was realizing how ignorant we were regarding the racism that people encounter daily. I also remember when one of my black friends laughed at me and explained how racist the black community can be towards whites and (lovingly) mocked me for thinking only caucasians are capable of racism.


    I don’t think the election results are ever only due to racism, full stop. But, it certainly is a factor. Because race is a factor on ALL sides for so much of what happens in the US and other environs. Just like racism with Indigenous Nations still affects politics in Canada.


    I don’t think realizing the ways our heritage makes us different, laughing about those differences or asking to be educated is a bad thing. Or being proud of where we come from. Differences can be celebrated.


    Harm comes from thinking that those differences should result in different levels of treatment or that they make anyone less deserving of freedom, justice, care and dignity.


    It bothers me that people won’t own up to their own racist attitudes or even admit it’s present within themselves. How can progress be made if a population is in denial about their own truth?

    I'm open to the idea that someone - of any background - might say "Not me. I'm not racist in any way." But, it would take some compelling evidence for me to acquiesce.
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  2. #2
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    The word racism has lost its potency because the Left has overused it to shame whites for things that have nothing to do with race. I think it's important to distinguish race from culture. Cultures should never be free from criticism. I don't believe it is bigoted to view a particular culture as more superior than others; at least not the belief itself. Unfortunately, people who adopt practices from other cultures are often branded as traitors to their race or viewed as disrespectful toward the culture they're adopting. There are so many double standards when it comes to race relations, depending on whether someone belongs to a minority or majority, that it seems futile to even discuss these issues anymore.

  3. #3
    You're unbelievable ... ilikeitlikethat's Avatar
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    Racists are people too.
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  4. #4
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crabs View Post
    The word racism has lost its potency because the Left has overused it to shame whites for things that have nothing to do with race. I think it's important to distinguish race from culture. Cultures should never be free from criticism. I don't believe it is bigoted to view a particular culture as more superior than others; at least not the belief itself. Unfortunately, people who adopt practices from other cultures are often branded as traitors to their race or viewed as disrespectful toward the culture they adopt. There are so many double standards when it comes to race relations, depending on whether someone belongs to a minority or majority, that it seem futile to even discuss these issues anymore.
    I agree there is a distinction between race and culture. But, the two are not exempt from connection.

    It's why (for example) my beloved SIL will educate us in Asian Culture. The race - and the culture that results from it - are linked.

    I agree that discussions can be exhaustive and still produce no change. It's why I am more interested in personal truth. Do YOU feel you are at times a racist or have prejudices? What is the thought process around this?

    How can we address things on a grand-scale if we ignore them on an individual one?

    Unfortunately, people who adopt practices from other cultures are often branded as traitors to their race or viewed as disrespectful toward the culture they adopt.
    Good observation. How unfortunate that tendency is!! I think dynamics like that would lessen the more people were honest with themselves. We (humans) are most threatened by what we do not understand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    I agree there is a distinction between race and culture. But, the two are not exempt from connection.

    It's why (for example) my beloved SIL will educate us in Asian Culture. The race - and the culture that results from it - are linked.

    I agree that discussions can be exhaustive and still produce no change. It's why I am more interested in personal truth. Do YOU feel you are at times a racist or have prejudices? What is the thought process around this?

    How can we address things on a grand-scale if we ignore them on an individual one?



    Good observation. How unfortunate that tendency is!! I think dynamics like that would lessen the more people were honest with themselves. We (humans) are most threatened by what we do not understand.
    Sure, race and culture have some correlations depending on geography, but they're not synonymous and to conflate the two, I believe, is a disservice to everyone. People can't control the physical traits they were born with. They're not responsible for the culture they were raised in either, but they do have a choice about how they behave. And behaviors should be judged on their own merits, not whether it's culturally acceptable or commonplace.

    No, I don't believe that I'm a racist; not in the sense that I believe any race is inherently superior to another. That's not to say that certain races don't have biological advantages, statistically speaking. There are a lot of factors at play when it comes to race relations. Why is it that police officers often feel more threatened by African Americans? Is it simply because their skin is black? Or is it because, on average, blacks tend to be taller and it's human nature to feel threatened by those who are more physically imposing? Are the black people in question associated with a culture that is violent and hostile toward law-enforcement? Everything can't simply be reduced to a matter of thinking one's race is superior to another.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Riva's Avatar
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    But, the two are not exempt from connection.blessIt's why (for example) my beloved SIL will educate us in Asian Culture. The race - and the culture that results from it - are linked.
    Either i disagree with this or just don't get what you are trying to say here.

    Of course it's exclusive. Two persons belonging to a certain race (lets say chinese) would have completely different cultures if one lived in beijin and the other in hong kong.

    Race - nature
    Culture and religion - choice

    Crabs made a very good point up there. People are too quick to use the word racism. I think this is a defense mechanism. They are criticising our culture and religion. Lets call them racist.

    Where i come from 99% of the people have the same skin tone. So racial superiority (racism) doesn't much exist. However a small group of people belonging to a certain religion/culture are demanding the right to marry under-age girls (pre-puberty girls) claiming it's a religious/cultural right. Most others - and also some belonging to the same minority group - are against this and often mock and critices their demands/religion/culture. Does this mean the others are racist? No, because they do not believe the minority group of people are racially inferior. They just think their demands are creepy.

  7. #7
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crabs View Post
    Sure, race and culture have some correlation depending on geography, but they're not synonymous and to conflate the two, I believe, is a disservice to everyone. People can't control the physical traits they were born with. They likely had no choice in the culture they were born into either, but they do have a choice about how they behave. And behaviors should be judged on their own merit, not whether it's culturally acceptable or commonplace.

    No, I don't believe that I'm a racist; not in the sense that I believe any race is inherently superior to another. That's not to say that certain races don't have biological advantages, statistically speaking. There are a lot of factors at play when it comes to race relations. Why is it that police officers often feel more threatened by African Americans? Is it simply because their skin is black? Or is it because, on average, blacks tend to be taller and it's human nature to feel threatened by those who are more physically imposing? Are the black people in question associated with a culture that is violent and hostile toward law-enforcement? Everything can't simply be reduced to a matter of thinking one's race is superior to another.
    I agree behaviour shouldn't be predicated on culture or race. It's why I said there is a connection, not that they should be conflated

    I will deal with that more in answering Riva below.

    The bolded blue addresses the noun in the OP. I don't think most people are racist in that sense. But, do you mean that you are 100% free from any manner of prejudicial thinking that arises from the race you were born as? I am not even talking so much about overt behaviour, but even as subtle thinking ?


    Quote Originally Posted by riva View Post
    Either i disagree with this or just don't get what you are trying to say here.

    Of course it's exclusive. Two persons belonging to a certain race (lets say chinese) would have completely different cultures if one lived in beijin and the other in hong kong.

    Race - nature
    Culture and religion - choice

    It's ok if we disagree

    I still am not sure if we do. I agree that race and culture are exclusive but also that they are linked.

    In your example: Yes, the culture differs from place to place. But, there are also commonalities. For example, the awareness of living in a city that is densely populated, crowded and noisy. Street food that is inexpensive. Bicycles being a major mode of transport. When and how to use chopsticks as an eating utensil. Things like this encompass a greater "Asian Culture" (in this case I am speaking to what I have literally observed on travels).


    Quote Originally Posted by riva View Post
    Crabs made a very good point up there. People are too quick to use the word racism. I think this a defense mechanism. They are criticising our culture and religion. Lets call them racist.

    Where i come from 99% of the people have the same skin tone. So racial superiority (racism) doesn't much exist. However a small group of people belonging to a certain religion/culture are demanding the right to marry under-age girls (pre-puberty girls) claiming it's a religious/cultural right. So most other people are against this and often mocks and critices their demans/religion/culture. Does this mean the others are racist? No, because they do not believe the minority group of people are racially inferior. They just think their demands are creepy.
    I think that is because the word has a sting to it. It's considered a negative. I am asking: is it necessarily always a negative? Yes, to view your own race as superior to another's is not to be admired and can be dangerous. Because it's a negative are we automatically immune from doing so? We may think "of course I don't consider my way superior!", but do we have subtle prejudices that actually do exist?

    If being called a racist didn't immediately translate to = "You are a bad, bigoted person" then maybe people would be more open to examining the prejudices they do have

    I agree with you in the closing example you gave that the dissension is to do with morality and values and perspective, not race. I am talking less about what other people perceive racism as, or the conflicts that arise because of it and more about "are we personally able to identify the preferences we individually have based on our backgrounds"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    The bolded blue addresses the noun in the OP. I don't think most people are racist in that sense. But, do you mean that you are 100% free from any manner of prejudicial thinking that arises from the race you were born as? I am not even talking so much about overt behaviour, but even as subtle thinking ?
    Of course, everyone has prejudicial thinking to some extent. It's related to our ability to recognize patterns and unconsciously predict possible outcomes based on limited data, as a means of survival. Is it politically correct? Not at all. Is it beneficial? Absolutely.

  9. #9
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crabs View Post
    Of course, everyone has prejudicial thinking to some extent. It's related to our ability to recognize patterns and unconsciously predict possible outcomes based on limited data, as a means of survival. Is it politically correct? Not at all. Is it beneficial? Absolutely.
    Interesting. Ok, thanks for indulging the discussion.

    I have noticed that people are uncomfortable when I say that I have had to ponder my own thinking and discover what racist attitudes I have that I wasn't even aware of. People WILL acknowledge having inherent prejudices but will NOT say that they are racist in any way. The word itself seems to hold a lot of power and negative perception.

  10. #10
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    I'm from Japan. We're some of the most racist people in the world.

    We just don't have the same filter as the West does.

    I think, to Japanese racial differences are"当たり前" which means it's obvious that people are different, and it's not a sin to recognize those differences.

    We're actually very intrigued by those differences.
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