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  1. #1
    Senior Member lightsun's Avatar
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    Default Learning Styles: Different personality types learn best in different ways.

    Learn: We each are unique individuals. Different personality types learn best in different ways. Wouldn't it behoove us to do personality testing to discover the child's best aptitude for learning? Having a child learn in their preferred tendency could very well yield increased strides in learning alongside actualizing a child's gifts. Why have we not done this yet? Now it is important for a child to be familiar with all different styles of learning. However would it not increase learning by focusing on a child's particular natural persuasion in learning?

    The seven styles of learning:

    (1) Visual (Spatial): You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.

    (2) Aural (Auditory-Musical): You prefer using sound and music.

    (3) Verbal (Linguistic): You prefer using words, both in speech and writing.

    (4) Physical (Kinesthetic): You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch.

    (5) Solitary (Intrapersonal): You prefer to work alone and use self study.

    (6) Social (Interpersonal): You prefer to learn in groups or with other people.

    (7) Logical (Mathematical): You prefer using logic, reasoning and systems.
    LightSun Paul Peaceweaver

  2. #2
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    (8) Explosive epiphany - my style of learning.

    You take all the other methods and throw them against the wall of my mind. If you're patient with me there will come a time when I suddenly seem to know everything I didn't and excel at all the tasks I struggled with.

    If you ask how, I can't tell, if you try to pinpoint a specific style, you will fail. It's been my great pain during education where the various governing bodies have been unable to help me (though many were made up of decent and truly caring people).

    No pattern has been detected yet.

    Except one : To bear with the misery of being incompetent and disliked long enough for the process to take place.

    Unfortunately that patience is not just my own.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Metis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lightsun View Post
    Learn: We each are unique individuals. Different personality types learn best in different ways. Wouldn't it behoove us to do personality testing to discover the child's best aptitude for learning? Having a child learn in their preferred tendency could very well yield increased strides in learning alongside actualizing a child's gifts. Why have we not done this yet? Now it is important for a child to be familiar with all different styles of learning. However would it not increase learning by focusing on a child's particular natural persuasion in learning?

    The seven styles of learning:

    (1) Visual (Spatial): You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.

    (2) Aural (Auditory-Musical): You prefer using sound and music.

    (3) Verbal (Linguistic): You prefer using words, both in speech and writing.

    (4) Physical (Kinesthetic): You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch.

    (5) Solitary (Intrapersonal): You prefer to work alone and use self study.

    (6) Social (Interpersonal): You prefer to learn in groups or with other people.

    (7) Logical (Mathematical): You prefer using logic, reasoning and systems.
    Definitely relate more to the three sensory styles. I have two modes for learning: Out of my head and in my head. I'm prone to getting pulled into my head, for whatever reason, but I don't find it that effective to get me where I want to go, and it isn't enjoyable. That's why, although I scored high on verbal & mathematical portions of standardized tests, and those would be considered my "strengths", I try to make things more sensate when I study. Don't want to be trapped in a headspace.

    Quote Originally Posted by lightsun View Post
    Now it is important for a child to be familiar with all different styles of learning.
    Probably a good idea to have a balance among them.

    Quote Originally Posted by lightsun View Post
    However would it not increase learning by focusing on a child's particular natural persuasion in learning?
    Then you run the risk of over-focussing on that and forcing them into that mold, based on the interpretation of the assessment. Even if you got it right, you can still be straitjacketing them if you're getting too particular about it. More creativity and variety in combining styles would be better. Address both strengths and weaknesses, but also address combinations. For example, I can be strong in both visual & verbal, but if they're two different modes of thinking for me, then I might not be strong at combining them, eg., discussing a work of visual art, or giving directions. I might be strong in both social and solitary learning, but it might be more of a challenge to shift from one to the other within a single project. Those are good skills to practice. I'm seeing way more creativity in regards to that stuff than I was seeing 20+ years ago, in general. Even with online learning in the picture, the teaching methods seem to be evolving to include more variety, instead of relying more heavily on a solitary/verbal/visual combo. I like the changes that I've seen.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
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    I dont really learn. Well. Not in those ways.

    My way is basically guessing. And guessing. And picking up little pieces of things and hoping that at some point- you can get enough pieces of the puzzle together that the rest of what you are trying to understand just naturally fits.

    Ive just sort of realized... that isnt something that is going to easily work for me in the career I might be going into. And my major.

    I need to find a new way of doing things- because in a situation where you have the entirety of the puzzle laid out in front of you... and you are supposed to be able to memorize the details of every single piece... well. Thats a ton harder for me. But thats what my major basically is.

    So Im going to try something different. Im not going to even ATTEMPT to find my own understanding. Im not going to use the way I usually learn to understand this. Where... if I try enough things- I can figure out what does and doesnt work. I cant do that with this. I cant build outwards.

    So. Im not going to do the problems. Im not going to try to understand anything... until I can see the entirety of the frame of what I need to know. So. That means.

    That means reading. And rereading. And rereading so many times that these things become as familiar to me as the concept of the sky being blue and grass being green. Things that dont fit at first glane- facts that I might not immediately understand the relationship between- but that I know- and wherea-because Im familiar- so familiar- with the parts- I can eventually understand the concept of what sticks them all together.

    I cant do it like I normally could. Where Id be like-the grass is purple/blue/yellow/green/orange- which makes sense? Because I dont have thefoundation yet- because this foundation is huge and tricky and very specific and clunky- to determine not only if Im wrong- but why.

    Anyways. I dont know if this makes a ton of sense. But I dont really relate to any of those learning styles. I mean. I relate to some less than others. But none of them really seem... me
    The only kinds of fights worth fighting are those you’re going to lose, because somebody has to fight them and lose and lose and lose until someday, somebody who believes as you do wins.
    I.F. Stone

    Johari

    Nohari
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  5. #5
    . bechimo's Avatar
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    The problem with tailoring teaching styles to learning styles is the structure of the educational system that places a teacher, the primary focus of the classroom and cost, the overwhelming priority. And pragmatically, how can a single teacher teach multiple styles for every lesson plan? Because the majority of students have multi-model learning styles, the educational system thuds onwards.

    This is why I support online education where the student can select the tutorials that best fit their needs.
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  6. #6
    . bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lib View Post
    I am completely against online education or home schooling as a main form of education.
    I like online but don't want the parents to make the choices for their children so we agree about home schooling.
    First, everybody should learn about the different learning styles even if they don't have the qualities to excel in all of them.
    Clearly, people should work to their weaknesses and not work to their strengths.
    Second, one of the most important life lesson learned in school is the ability to teamwork.
    Collaborations can be handled online.
    Third, discipline and responsibility are also usually taught in school.
    What makes you think they can't be taught via virtual classrooms? Skype's been around for a decade+.
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  7. #7
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lib View Post
    That must be some sort of unconscious learning:
    Subliminal study shows subconscious learning is possible | New Scientist
    Interesting idea, that might be it.

    One of my personal discoveries was quite similar, in that I found the relationship between different kinds of attention are hugely important for how I might learn something. For example, it was a surprise to me that a focused, narrowly defined attention as demanded by mass schooling systems, seemed really counter-intuitive to how effective my learning experience was.

    And not just in learning, but in many other areas of life. Try falling asleep by telling yourself you are going to sleep, while also attempting to mark the point where you cross over into unconsciousness..... It's functionally impossible because you are trying to bring an unconscious state into conscious attention, but it only happens at all precisely because you weren't looking for it and, like explaining a joke, that dissection kills it dead, or at least renders it into an unrecognisable form; one that can't really be called sleep anymore.

    It's why I struggle most with tactile practical skills, they are applied and explained as if they require the most sequential and step based methods to learn, whereas I know the truth (at least as it seems to me) that there is the definition won through the cultural passing on of skills, but there is also the individual definition that requires both yourself and others to allow for the preferences of what arises naturally without a focused attention, in order to 'perfect' the skill by building upon it.

    A simplistic example would be that I'm currently training to be a veterinary nurse and I'm being taught these basic skills (of which I am dangerously and embarrassingly lacking) of handling and scrubbing (areas for surgery) animals that come into practice. Yet, the methods don't entirely seem to get through to me and I annoy the ones who are supposed to be teaching me, but I can't help it if my height and size means the methods need to be 'instinctivised' to some degree and when that will happen is a mystery. And that creates distrust and I find it painful to know that others don't trust me or my abilities (or potential to develop).

    Modern pressures of population numbers, money and time etc....tend to get in the way and can create both real and illusory stresses that demand efficient and effective methods which can be applied in a set manner for an outcome.

    Must be frustrating to find out that individual preference remains; two different forms of the same swimming stroke.

    It's certainly frustrating for me, but maybe that's because I'm a strange kind of useless compared to the more practical and logically-oriented people (of whom I have great admiration for).

    I guess I just need more patience with myself, and to put up with my uneasy relations.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.
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  8. #8
    . bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lib View Post
    The thing is that the students themselves have even less understanding of their weaknesses and the knowledge that they're missing. Most would prefer to do things that come naturally to them, so very few would choose to work on their less developed skills.
    As long as standard curricula has been addressed, this makes no sense to me. There are many roads to the same destination.

    You can't compare online to real-life communication. The latter includes many more stimuli thus helps to develop more complex neuronal pathways.
    Can you provide a citation that backs up your opinion?

    There's more here than meets the eye. Are you in education, whether as a student or working in the educational system?
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  9. #9
    Seeking Rainbows Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bechimo View Post
    The problem with tailoring teaching styles to learning styles is the structure of the educational system that places a teacher, the primary focus of the classroom and cost, the overwhelming priority. And pragmatically, how can a single teacher teach multiple styles for every lesson plan? Because the majority of students have multi-model learning styles, the educational system thuds onwards.

    This is why I support online education where the student can select the tutorials that best fit their needs.
    Some classrooms now seem to blend the approaches, with students accessing online resources which can be individualized, while the teacher works with them in small groups and one on one to facilitate. Of course this works best when classes are smaller, which most schools don't have the funding to support.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lib View Post
    I am completely against online education or home schooling as a main form of education.
    First, everybody should learn about the different learning styles even if they don't have the qualities to excel in all of them.
    Second, one of the most important life lesson learned in school is the ability to teamwork.
    Third, discipline and responsibility are also usually taught in school.
    Online education is a godsend in smaller communities where schools are far away, or small and limited in course offerings. Teamwork can just as easily be learned in scout troops, community bands/choruses, sports teams, etc. Honestly, the only thing I learned about teamwork in school was to hate working in teams. Discipline and responsibility should be taught first and foremost at home. And everywhere else I already mentioned. If the only place a child gets taught this is school, they won't learn it very well.

    If anything, schools make it hard for students to develop a true sense of responsibility because they are told incessantly that the adults are responsible for them. They do not give students more responsibility and trust as they get older, and help them understand and learn from it when they err. All the choices are made for them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lib View Post
    The thing is that the students themselves have even less understanding of their weaknesses and the knowledge that they're missing. Most would prefer to do things that come naturally to them, so very few would choose to work on their less developed skills.
    Every article and seminar on professional development I have encountered has observed that we get more out of developing our strengths than addressing our weaknesses. It is often enough to be aware of them, and develop strategies for compensating, such as that teamwork you mentioned.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...
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  10. #10
    . bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Some classrooms now seem to blend the approaches, with students accessing online resources which can be individualized, while the teacher works with them in small groups and one on one to facilitate. Of course this works best when classes are smaller, which most schools don't have the funding to support.
    Aren't they trying to emulate the successful Finnish style of education?

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