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  1. #21
    Senior Member RedAmazoneFriendZone's Avatar
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    When one is young....craving for freedom.....When we're young we don't know what freedom is......respecting oneself first and others.

    Learning about oneself and personal human values. Having fun. Being creative. Question authority. Communication with oneself first. With others in a non-violent way.

    Learn how to relax, how to observe, how to feel. Also, teaching why impulsive (or compulsive) judgement is so destructive. Learn french (because it is a beautiful language).

    Listen to your dreams. Trust yourself. The same for adults. Anyway there are many young people who are much more mature than some old stuffs.
    ALL THAT WE SEE OR SEEM TO BE IS BUT A DREAM WITHIN A DREAM

    Dare observing your shadows (50 shades of darkness) for your own well-being Unfortunately we are all fucking contagious Smile and see what happens around you......
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  2. #22
    ha-ha-hoo Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    More IRL application, as in networking in friend & business circles?
    Exactly.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member Babybop's Avatar
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    The school systems need to chill with the life lesson stuff and teach kids facts and practical skills. I had so many reoccurring social justice themes in school: usually diversity, environmental protection, good manners, sharing, etc. I hated all of it and it certainly didn't make me a better person. Teach what is objective and leave the rest up to each individual.
    Previous username: EliaBlack
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  4. #24
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    What do you think it's most important for kids to be taught, to create a stellar future generation?
    1) Lord loves a working man.
    2) Don't trust whitey
    3) See a doctor; get rid of it.
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  5. #25
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    Physical fitness and health.
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  6. #26
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    Real world applications. How to do your taxes. How to sew clothing. How to cook and how to clean without breaking the bank. How to use your manners around other people. How to balance a checkbook. Things like that. I am raised in a generation of "how do hell do i adult kek" and it sometimes infuriates me that my parents never really took the time to teach me real life lessons that could have prepared me after moving out of their house.
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  7. #27
    don't ask me Flâneuse's Avatar
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    I probably won’t ever have kids, but if I did I hope I could instill these principles/values somehow (how I could instill them is something I'm far less sure of):
    - You are not the center of the universe, nor do you live in a vacuum. Other people are just as real as you, so treat them like they matter. Be aware that your actions (or inaction) inevitably have consequences for others as well as yourself, while keeping the Golden Rule in mind.
    - Be aware of and prepared for the world to be unfair and for some people to be selfish and unkind, but don’t give in to it by either becoming that way yourself or by being a pushover.
    - Be responsible. Unless you have a very good reason not to, follow through on something once you have given your word. Also, take into account what the long-term consequences of an action are likely to be, both for yourself and others. It's okay to be spontaneous and impulsive at times, but also know when things should be taken seriously and don't get in the habit of choosing short-term satisfaction at the expense of your long-term development.
    - Universal love. I hear so much about teaching self-esteem and self-love to children and far less about teaching them to be loving in general. Instead of overemphasizing feelings for the self, I think it's a better approach to encourage them to recognize a sacred, shared humanity in all people, including the self, and to therefore have a general concern and compassion for all. Basically, "love your neighbor as yourself" is a better message than simply "love yourself". (I think a lot of parents these days try to instill self-esteem by overpraising their kids/telling them they're special, but this just causes them to develop an unhealthy need for recognition as superior that undermines real self-esteem, which isn't reliant on feeling superior to others.)

    Individuality and interconnectedness, and how they are complementary, not contradictory.
    - Individuality (independent thinking, guiding your own development based on your own unique strengths and desires instead of trying to mold yourself after someone else, being in touch with yourself/self-aware.) NOT putting your own needs over others' or seeing yourself as more valuable and unique than others, because that's just narcissism and selfishness, not individuality.
    - Interconnectedness: I hope I could teach them the importance of connection with others, being able to relate and empathize, even to see themselves as a small part of a greater whole and to want to use one’s individual strengths to enrich life for others who are part of the greater whole.

    ...Among others, but these were the ones that came to mind first.

    As far as what I think kids should learn at school:
    - One course in macroeconomics and at least one in civics and government should be required in high school, simply because basic knowledge of these subjects is needed to be a decently informed participant in a democracy.
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  8. #28
    darkened dreams Ravenetta's Avatar
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    Strength is found in lessening the pain in the world. No matter what happens we can still listen to someone who is alone, save a puppy, visit an elderly person. Even when we are sick, depressed, in poverty, we still have the power to make the world a little lighter.
    bunny omi

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  9. #29
    Senior Member Babybop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theforsaken View Post
    Real world applications. How to do your taxes. How to sew clothing. How to cook and how to clean without breaking the bank. How to use your manners around other people. How to balance a checkbook. Things like that. I am raised in a generation of "how do hell do i adult kek" and it sometimes infuriates me that my parents never really took the time to teach me real life lessons that could have prepared me after moving out of their house.
    I'm not sure if this is a common thing or not, but my high school had tons of classes like cooking, sewing, interpersonal relations, college + careers (basically an adulting class), not to mention a ton of work-study-ish programs for everything from business to early childhood education to welding to cyber security. These programs also counted for a buttload of free college credits. And I live in friggin Indiana, so I doubt that there are less opportunities in more progressive states.

    I think the problem is not what isn't being taught; the problem is what is being forcibly taught. We have the 'pointless intellectualism' trinity in every high school and most colleges (math, history, and science). Unless you feel passionate about any of these subjects or want to have a career in one of those fields, there is very little practical application for solving long division problems, listing the battles of the Civil War, or knowing about mitosis. At least English classes teach kids to cite sources correctly and write in a way that makes them seem competent, but even those go over-the-top with boring literature. Oh, and at least one art or music class is mandatory for some reason. (And the art/music teachers are not at all tolerant of the kids who are "just in it for a credit," so half the time, they end up failing and having to take it more than once).

    Honestly, I understand that teenagers are indecisive and lazy (especially since I was one until this year and those words still describe me perfectly). They might waste their time with 8 PE classes or put all their effort into one subject only to change their mind halfway through their senior year. But if we're going to make classes mandatory, why can't it be the classes which contain knowledge that everyone will inevitably use on a pretty much daily basis?
    Previous username: EliaBlack
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  10. #30
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    That its alright not to believe in any of the voguish, liberal, flash in the pan thinking that is being pushed hard by the media, politicians and the "cool kids", you dont need to hate anyone but you dont need to feel guilty for things you did not do personally, for who you are, for having feelings for that girl (if you're a boy) or for having feelings for that boy (if you're a girl), you dont need to be ashamed of the things you believe, your parents believe, your grandparents believed or any of them before that away down the years, that you have to be wary of all this not for some abstract, academic or even political reason but that there are people, and you are likely to encounter them, that'll seek to exploit your opinions and beliefs, if they discover you've got unpopular ones, to their advantage, maybe it'll be getting you thrown out of your job or in trouble with your boss, or maybe it'll be worse, black mail, setting thugs up to confront you or whatever.

    Besides that I'd say its important to develop some other sorts of self-awareness too, while being conscious that if you do most other people wont have and you'll have to deal with the difficult of encountering their lack of awareness and the reality that they wont be told and wont become aware simply by attempts to tell them so.

    And I'd give them a copy of Erich Fromm's Art of Being. I listen to it regularly in an audiobook format when I'm driving anyplace.
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