User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 17

  1. #1
    Member ugghh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    3w2 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILE Ne
    Posts
    79

    Default Faking being a different type in a recruitment process?

    Maybe this is the wrong forum, but something I've been thinking about recently.. MBTI tests are sometimes used in recruitment processes where I live, and it seems like HR take the results seriosly - a friend of mine lost his chance at a job after testing as a type they didn't want to hire. I know that in my field, NTJ qualities are generally considered ideal (I'm ENTP but have mistyped as INTJ and ENTJ before). I feel like I have a good enough grasp on typology to fake being a different type on a test, and I don't see it as immoral if it was the difference between getting or not getting a job I wanted...
    Have you done this before? How did it work out?

  2. #2
    Phase-shifted beam Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    27,196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ugghh View Post
    Maybe this is the wrong forum, but something I've been thinking about recently.. MBTI tests are sometimes used in recruitment processes where I live, and it seems like HR take the results seriosly - a friend of mine lost his chance at a job after testing as a type they didn't want to hire. I know that in my field, NTJ qualities are generally considered ideal (I'm ENTP but have mistyped as INTJ and ENTJ before). I feel like I have a good enough grasp on typology to fake being a different type on a test, and I don't see it as immoral if it was the difference between getting or not getting a job I wanted...
    Have you done this before? How did it work out?
    I have not done it. I can say that use of psychological types on any scale as a litmus test for employment is unethical, and strongly opposed by the MBTI "authorities". Obviously that doesn't mean it doesn't happen. I would hesitate to work for an employer who uses type tests in this way, but if you feel you really need the job, I see no issue with faking a typing test to help your chances, considering it is something that shouldn't be a factor anyway.
    Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth. ~ Buddha

  3. #3
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    yupp
    Posts
    34,330

    Default

    I have a hard time pretending to be someone else for an extended period of time, so i can't imagine doing something like this because i'd rather get a job with the skills i have or being upfront and saying i'm not good at this/ i don't know how to do this but i can learn (hopefully)
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so :hi:

  4. #4
    Senior Member cascadeco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,115

    Default

    While I do not think companies should be using mbti in such a black and white manner -- ie someone who genuinely is excited about the job and has the skills to do it well should not be written off just because they don't have 'type' the company thinks will be best suited for the job -- I do think there's truth in the fact that some jobs are in fact more suited for someone with a natural disposition for, say, being an extroverted people-pleasing people person vs someone who's behind the scenes and likes working with numbers and computers (as an extreme example). I think that's ultimately what the HR people are trying to get at when using the tests for employment purposes.... they're looking at these extreme examples. Unfortunately I think a lot of people may be more in the middle of the road for several traits, or passion/determination does in fact trump their 'type', so that's where using the test is backwards/wrong, imo.

    If I genuinely needed a job, though, and knew the type of person the company wanted for the role / who the 'ideal type' for the particular role I was applying for was, I wouldn't hesitate to answer the questions as such (assuming I really needed the job and/or really wanted it but knew my answering the questions honestly wouldn't allow me to get it). That said, there might be some self-reflection there to admit to yourself that you may not 'naturally' be the most suited for the job.... even if you do need/want it...
    "...On and on and on and on he strode, far out over the sands, singing wildly to the sea, crying to greet the advent of the life that had cried to him." - James Joyce

    My Photography and Watercolor Fine Art Prints!!! Cascade Colors Fine Art Prints

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    20,734

    Default

    You'll end up fired if you can't deliver the goods, no matter what your score is.

  6. #6
    Saturn's Amethyst
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    MBTI
    ENxP
    Enneagram
    749 so/sp
    Posts
    6,419

    Default

    Frankly if a company is using any typology system to screen candidates for a job they have lost the plot and have no idea how to effectively screen suitability for a job. Typology is no substitute for proper and right hiring practices.

  7. #7
    ƃuıǝǝs | seeing Snow as White's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    4w3 sx/sp
    Posts
    496

    Default

    Using MBTI for this purpose seems to strange. Might as well hire based on astrology.

    Are you sure you want to work in a place that would do this? If someone is going to base how well I will do on a job based on this versus my job and education experiences then.... what is the point.
    Likes ugghh, SurrealisticSlumbers liked this post

  8. #8
    Senior Member Non_xsense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    MBTI
    Fool
    Posts
    369

    Default

    Yeah , they should ... nobody want sensors and feelers trying to use the brain . Some XXXJ are good slaves for stupids mechanical task so yeah .

  9. #9
    Member DarkMin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    2w1
    Posts
    83

    Default

    It depends on what's being looked at and how they're using the results. If the companies involved are using it to find out whether someone's bubbly, outgoing, and will gladly do the "upsell" thing then a member of the "I..." family of personality types isn't really going to cut it. On the other hand, if the jobs involve endless hours with nothing but books (or digital equivalent) for company, then an "E..." isn't the ideal person.

    However, if they're getting more specific than that, I think there's a real issue of discrimination.
    Likes ugghh liked this post

  10. #10
    Phase-shifted beam Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    27,196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    You'll end up fired if you can't deliver the goods, no matter what your score is.
    Exactly. This is why type should not be a factor in hiring, but rather the ability to do the actual job. Any type can do any job, if they put their mind to it.

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkMin View Post
    It depends on what's being looked at and how they're using the results. If the companies involved are using it to find out whether someone's bubbly, outgoing, and will gladly do the "upsell" thing then a member of the "I..." family of personality types isn't really going to cut it. On the other hand, if the jobs involve endless hours with nothing but books (or digital equivalent) for company, then an "E..." isn't the ideal person.

    However, if they're getting more specific than that, I think there's a real issue of discrimination.
    The best use of type knowledge at work is not in hiring, but in helping employees understand themselves better so they can take advantage of their strengths and compensate for their weaknesses. Sometimes it is the type which is atypical for a job that brings fresh insights and new ways of doing business, not to mention breaking any groupthink on a team. Hiring by type is incredibly short-sighted and limiting, both to the employees and to the organization.
    Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth. ~ Buddha
    Likes ugghh liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. Similar vs Different Types in Relationships
    By gromit in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-12-2014, 09:32 AM
  2. [NF] Say it in a picture...what it's like to be your NF type...
    By Ene in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-13-2014, 03:18 PM
  3. Appearing to be a different type than you are?
    By Chiharu in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-04-2011, 03:02 AM
  4. Promoting emotional Well Being, a different type of work out....
    By tinkerbell in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 11-16-2009, 12:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO