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  1. #31
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientSpirits View Post

    I know of StrengthsFinder. I haven't taken it or critically examined it. My initial impression is meh.

    In a society that rewards people for specialization, focusing on developing our strengths makes sense. Moreover, I believe that however much we grow, that growth remains within the context of our type, perhaps within just our dominant function. So a person is wasting time trying to be some other type. Just be the best your type can be. Say "no" to "type falsification".
    The basic theory is that we have natural gifts and that we are much better off capitalizing on those gifts than working on our weaknesses. So much of coaching and development over the years has been about working on our weaknesses. The idea behind this stuff is that if I'm a Michael Jordan at basketball, I shouldn't be focusing on my chess game or baseball. I think it's an important thing from the perspective of work, productivity and enjoyment of what you are doing. One concept is that there are certain things that give us energy and those things that drain us. We can really be good at something but hate it or love something and be bad at it. The trick is to find the things that we love, that give us energy and that we are good at and increase the percentage of time in a particular day that we spend on those things. I find it to be relevant. I discovered this around 16 years ago. My strengths were command (willingness to confront others), achiever (always needing to accomplish something), focus (having goals and spending time in pursuit of them), restorative (solving problems) and ideation (coming up with ideas, brainstorming, etc.). I have spent different percentages of time doing different things over the years based on whatever role I was in. What I observed in my career is that the times when I really had breakthrough accomplishments and the most personal growth, I was using the combination of all my natural talents in combination at the same time a large percentage of the time. They were also some of the most memorable times in my career. So I think there is something to the stuff. It's worth looking at. There is a part of me that doesn't like the style he presents in (Fe dom?) but the things he says are valid.


    Please provide feedback on my Nohari and Johari Window by clicking here: Nohari/Johari

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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nørrsken View Post
    Yeah I was being playful, my dad is into a lot of the same things as you do and I always admire people like you and him.. I know that the world keeps spinning because of highly intelligent ITJ folks like yourselves.
    That's kind of you to say. A few pats on the back are always nice. :-).
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merced View Post
    @AncientSpirits Intuitive bias: Real or very Real?
    • In the type community, the over-representation of iNtuitors, and the occasional complaints by Sensing folks that they get trotted out as curiosities, suggest there's bias in practice, even if not consciously intended.
    • Some iNtuiting folks talk smack about Sensing folks, so it's a real sometimes.
    • The type literature, the older stuff mostly, portrays Sensing as some kind of strangely simplistic process. For example, ESxPs apparently just sit around getting information through the five senses, with no action, or with ISxJs, with no nuance.
    • David Keirsey Sr in "Please Understand Me" plainly had some biases to work out, like ISTPs as serial killers. That's not how you open a type description.
    • Performance in our society using SAT, IQ, etc all suggest iNtuiting is the brainer process; never mind those are (likely) designed by iNtuiting types.
    • There's been a pattern of defining iNtuiting in its mature/healthy/heroic mode, while defining Sensing in its immature/unhealthy/villainous mode.
    • Shall I keep listing...?

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    The basic theory is that we have natural gifts and that we are much better off capitalizing on those gifts than working on our weaknesses. So much of coaching and development over the years has been about working on our weaknesses. The idea behind this stuff is that if I'm a Michael Jordan at basketball, I shouldn't be focusing on my chess game or baseball. I think it's an important thing from the perspective of work, productivity and enjoyment of what you are doing. One concept is that there are certain things that give us energy and those things that drain us. We can really be good at something but hate it or love something and be bad at it. The trick is to find the things that we love, that give us energy and that we are good at and increase the percentage of time in a particular day that we spend on those things. I find it to be relevant. I discovered this around 16 years ago. My strengths were command (willingness to confront others), achiever (always needing to accomplish something), focus (having goals and spending time in pursuit of them), restorative (solving problems) and ideation (coming up with ideas, brainstorming, etc.). I have spent different percentages of time doing different things over the years based on whatever role I was in. What I observed in my career is that the times when I really had breakthrough accomplishments and the most personal growth, I was using the combination of all my natural talents in combination at the same time a large percentage of the time. They were also some of the most memorable times in my career. So I think there is something to the stuff. It's worth looking at. There is a part of me that doesn't like the style he presents in (Fe dom?) but the things he says are valid.

    Thanks for the info. Yeah, I could take more of a look at it. Others have asked me about it.

    Generally, I agree that we want to know and play to our strengths. I'm a terrible basketball player. I have no talent there, so even if I put hours into it, why when I have strengths like teaching!?

    In the brain, there's skill and then there's motivation; if we say a strength lies at the intersection of both, I'm on board with that.

    That said, the video doesn't inspire me.

    Something to consider. Does focusing on strengths tend to reinforce the ego? Can deep renewal, and psychological growth, come from acting on our strengths? Or do those come from synergy or even just diversion with something else? Thinking back on my life, had I stuck with my strengths at age 15, at least as I understood them, I wouldn't be where I am at 45. Or maybe if an assessment had been really insightful... just some random thoughts.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    @AncientSpirits there is one thing I'm curious about. I have seen you talk in public in a few Youtube videos and such. One of the things that struck is is that you have a great deal of charisma. INTJs might be known for a lot of things but charisma in public speaking doesn't seem to be one of them. At first, I imagined you to be an ENTP or something and it surprised me when I found out later you were an INTJ. You are gifted in your ability to speak in front of people. Is this something that has always come naturally to you or is it learned? It's not the same style at all but there is one other INTJ (I think) that I once saw who was an amazing speaker - Colin Powell - one of the best speakers I have ever seen.
    Nice to you to say.

    When my students have learned about type, or more often temperament * interaction styles, they guess ENTP (or Get Things Going Theorist).

    My family says when I was little, I would get up on the table and sing for everyone. Living in Barbados instilled in me the value of happiness. But after I returned to the USA, and as I got older, especially as a teen, that joy of living slowly disappeared. I was a stereotypical INTJ. Like the kids in "Stranger Things", I was age 13 in 1983, shy and playing Dungeons and Dragons. But sometime between age 22 and 25, the "fun" me returned.

    In teaching or such, there are a lot of little things: telling some personal stories, staying relevant to people's lives, being passionate about a topic, acknowledging human nature, staying flexible and understanding, giving people something fun to try, noticing others' unstated needs, treating people like adults, being as fair as I can, not taking things personally, surprising people (in a good way).... I can't do these all the time, but they help.

    One time, after my mother-in-law watched me teach, she asked, "where is that Dario the rest of the time?" LOL
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  6. #36
    Guardian of Ga'Hoole Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    This is super cool.
    A path is made by walking on it.

    -Zhuangzi


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  7. #37
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    This visual compares the Trait vs Systems approaches to personality. Five Factor Model and such are on the Trait side. In contrast, the Systems approach is more Jungian, or minimally Myers-Briggs with Type Dynamics. From "Our Brains in Color" by Nardi.

    Last edited by AncientSpirits; 12-12-2017 at 01:28 PM.

  8. #38
    Armchair Explorer Doctor Anaximander's Avatar
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    Dario, what do you think about skeptics who claim MBTI is a fad that is unfounded in science? I saw an Adam Ruins Everything segment on MBTI and found it frustrating that he made the same basic claim, yet your work seems to be bringing MBTI closer to a place where it might be better backed up by empirical data. Is MBTI more than a pseudo scientific parlor game, and if so, how would you respond to the skeptics and critics?
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  9. #39
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    Typology can be a bit of a cult, with self-proclaimed experts roaming freely, typing others as if their perspective and understanding are supreme. I think anyone, and actually probably everyone, can fall prey to this arrogant position at times.
    - What do you say to those who feel confident in openly typing others based solely on online exposure void of any video (as in typing others based only on text)? Particularly those without any professional typological training.
    - What do you say to those on the other side of the exchange who often get irritated with those who proceed to tell them who they are?

    I'm not entirely confident in my self-typing of ENFP. I've never tested as ENFP on any function/dichotomy test, but I have tested as IEE-Ne in Socionics. Over time, I have realized that tests aren't as valuable as I had originally thought for a few reason:
    1. They are limited by the user's knowledge of the functions themselves.
    2. They are limited by the user's self-awareness.
    3. They are limited by the user's comprehension of the questions being asked, as in understanding them in the proper context.
    4. The tests could be flawed.
    5. Probably some other things I am forgetting.

    With that said, I find that some unusual type combinations (as in taking various systems into account) are unlikely to result in accurate test results. For example, a 4w5 ENFP, particularly Sp-first, may never test as an extrovert.
    - Do you have any advice for people struggling to settle on a Meyers-Briggs type for the above reason?

    Also, just for my own personal knowledge, since I am having difficulty getting a straight answers from anyone else:
    - How do I determine if I am using Ni-Se or Ne-Si when observing others and forming theories or conclusions about the unseen?
    - Could you give some examples of Ne in ENFPs that doesn't look like the stereotypical whimsical/zany examples of Ne that seem to dominate function descriptions?

    Sorry this turned into "let's type Peter!" I just want to solidify my understanding of the functions so I know what I am talking about, and self-referencing is the easiest way for me to do that it seems.

  10. #40
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    Wow. Thanks so much for this @highlander! I found this very interesting and will have to look at this further in depth later. (:

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