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  1. #1
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    Default Intuitive memory...

    I think there is a misconception of a good memory being attributed to an Introverted Sensing type. The Introverted Sensing type is said to be past oriented.

    But now I'm discovering that an Introverted Intuitive type is also good at remembering and is also very past oriented. I think the Introverted Intuitive could be just as good at remembering facts.

    But my thought about the difference is that the Si type will be better at remembering facts no matter what, while the Ni type will remember facts about things that are meaningful to them -- such as facts related to their interests, because those facts are focused on information that is meaningful, and so the facts aren't facts speaking for themselves, but for a purpose.

    My mind is a storehouse for data, but only the data related to my interests. I'm very good at memorizing things about roller coasters and movies and such, and I do extensive research on these things. On the other hand, I have trouble collecting data that isn't meaningful to me. I have trouble remembering smaller things like what I had for dinner last night, remembering dates which are unimportant to me, and so forth.

    I have trouble remembering the answers to questions on a test even when I study if the subject isn't related to my interests.

    So having said this, is this sort of data collection Ni functioning since it's primarily collecting meaningful and relational data rather than data in of itself?

  2. #2
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    But my thought about the difference is that the Si type will be better at remembering facts no matter what, while the Ni type will remember facts about things that are meaningful to them -- such as facts related to their interests, because those facts are focused on information that is meaningful, and so the facts aren't facts speaking for themselves, but for a purpose.

    ...So having said this, is this sort of data collection Ni functioning since it's primarily collecting meaningful and relational data rather than data in of itself?
    Well, if you think more about it, Si-oriented people (ISTJ and ISFJ) are ALSO remembering the things that are meaningful to them. It is simply that the meaningful data is concrete in nature and specific, while the Ni (INTJ and INFJ) people are remembering data of which the context and connection and resonance of that data is personally meaningful to them.

    What Si likes to do is construct an "inner reference world" based on their past experience. So everything they value and treasure (more for an ISFJ) or everything they think has shown itself to be "accurate" (more for an ISTJ) goes into that world... and then the present and future are always compared to that reference world -- it becomes the standard by which all other things are judged as good/bad or correct/incorrect.

    We all do this sort of thing to some degree, everyone has an Si function; it's just that ISxJ relies on it as its primary and first thought when they enter a situation.

    Ni is different. Whereas Si provides a fixed frame of reference, Ni abolishes frames of references... or rather it perceives that the connections among all the data can be changed very easily to support different points of view. All data is "spun" when it is delivered to the observer -- the originator of the data has already tried to interpret it and is trying to convince the observer to accept that interpretation -- but the INxJ can step back from that interpretation and spin the data in lots of different ways. There is no FIXED meaning as there is for Si people, who basically have one interpretation (and usually the most concrete/obvious one); the data can mean lots of different things.

    So I think Ni people can remember hard data just as easily as Si people can; it's just that Si people devote all their attention just to the hard data rather than perceiving various interpretations, while Ni people have the data in their head too but spend their brainpower shifting contexts of the data and switching from one interpretation to the other and then possibly promoting the interpretation they feel is most valuable. That leaves less energy just to devote to the obvious details themselves (and less interest in just the obvious details -- except for the topics you described that you are REALLY passionate about. Si remembers it all; you are just really focusing on the details that matter to you.)
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    Pareo cattus Natrushka's Avatar
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    Great post, Jennifer. You've described some of what goes on in my head better than I could. I have all this information, some of it I don't know where it came from, floating around in my head. I think some of it I notice and store away for later. I know my DH takes huge advantage of this to the point he'll call me at work and ask me where his diving watch is. The one he used last March. The one he's torn the house apart looking for. The one I know is in the carryon luggage because the battery died as we pushed away from the airport. DH, btw, is an ISTJ.

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    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natrushka View Post
    I know my DH takes huge advantage of this to the point he'll call me at work and ask me where his diving watch is. The one he used last March. The one he's torn the house apart looking for. The one I know is in the carryon luggage because the battery died as we pushed away from the airport.
    Hee, that's great! I love that sort of thing.

    DH, btw, is an ISTJ.
    Yes. And it wasn't in the expected spot, and that's all he has memorized, most likely ... the "official" location.

    Because they do not have the "contextual memory web," I think this is partly why ISxJ's do actually organize the way they do. They need to do it, in order to function. Some other types can use other strengths to deal with recalling where items are (such as what you mention, Nat -- where contexts stick in your head), so you don't need to organize physically as much as an ISxJ would have to.

    (And then you get ESFPs, who do not memorize or recall where anything is because they are so likeable and/or able to negotiate their way out of a bind or make do with what they have that they don't NEED to remember where ANYTHING is. )
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

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    I'd say I think so, if some told me that factual memory is associated with sensor psychological function. If you theorize about intuitive memory, then it should not be factual.
    I was able to remember some mathematical formulas and theory that I read decades ago by closing any sources except my mind and the name of math topic that I have read. Does it count as an example of intuitive memory.? I am inclined to say yes.
    The quality of memory will be differ with every type, if we associate the memory related to the cognitive functions and we assume every type has a memory.
    So Si-Te memory will be differ from Si-Fe memory, Ti-Se memory, and so on, Ni-Te memory is differ with Ni-Fe memory, and so on.
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    Senior Member Vendrah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by typologyenthusiast View Post
    I'd say I think so, if some told me that factual memory is associated with sensor psychological function. If you theorize about intuitive memory, then it should not be factual.
    I was able to remember some mathematical formulas and theory that I read decades ago by closing any sources except my mind and the name of math topic that I have read. Does it count as an example of intuitive memory.? I am inclined to say yes.
    The quality of memory will be differ with every type, if we associate the memory related to the cognitive functions and we assume every type has a memory.
    So Si-Te memory will be differ from Si-Fe memory, Ti-Se memory, and so on, Ni-Te memory is differ with Ni-Fe memory, and so on.
    How would you describe Ti-Ne or Ne-Ti and Ne-Fi or Fi-Ne memory?

    Also, I think this could be solved by statistics, but I dont remember seeing any statistics relating memorizing and type. I already see statistics like '"I have good memory", 60% of type A answered yes' but not a single one actually testing the memorizing. "I see my self as inteligent" or "I see myself very good at this game" doesnt make you inteligent or a pro gamer on its own.

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    Every function has its own kind of memory.

    Ni for instance has a "memory of understanding", which basically means, that if you've understood some particular thing in the past, then when you look at it again later, you'll still understand it, or you'll grasp it much more quickly.

    Si is more memory in the classical sense of retrieving specific facts, so it gets the memory label put on it, but really Si is only a particular kind of memory - a kind which is very particular.

    --

    What the OP is suggesting regarding memory seems to be along the lines of everyone having an Si-related memory, because everyone has Si, but for non SJs, the information is processed through multiple layers before reaching the Si, thus that which is remembered is that which is meaningful etc.
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  8. #8
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    OP is describing Ji and Si, so prolly an INxP or ISxJ type, probably more likely the former but not necessarily.
    A storehouse of facts is Si, and "what is important to me" is Fi/Ti.

    Or, alternatively, you could throw the whole system down the drain and say "fuck it, people is people", and then tell people to fuck off cuz it's all ultimately irrelevant anyway. I personally enjoy wasting all of my time studying useless shit, but I suggest you not be like me.
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    first we need to establish whether the cognitive functions are even governed by the same area of the brain that memory is.

    Regardless, I think intuition itself wouldn’t be involved in remembering, but rather in how someone makes sense of memories and finds pattern and meaning in what is in the past.

    As some previous posts suggest, strong use of intuition might determine how we remember and interpret past things and events, perhaps remembering context and trends and not necessarily being as focused on specific facts or details.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vendrah View Post
    How would you describe Ti-Ne or Ne-Ti and Ne-Fi or Fi-Ne memory?
    This is also my question. I don't know the answer. I would suggest to ask people with each cognitive functions combination to explain their intuitive memory.


    This is my understanding of intuitive memory.
    History lesson that we learnt at school has to be tied up with a certain psychological memory. Historical memory is collective in nature. National History collectively related to the people in the nation. It is not a person memory as an individual, it is the society memory, psychologically speaking. Extroverted feeling is a kind of feeling that possess collective attitude. Since, historical content is by nature factual like what events that happened, the political figures involved, the content of historical document like treaty, historical memory has to be related to Sensory memory. Introvert sensing-extrovert feeler (ISFJ, INTP if balanced) will be best at historical knowledge.

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