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  1. #1
    Senior Member Spectre's Avatar
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    Default Reasons for yoga

    I have just started to take yoga classes.
    It is something called MOJO yoga if anyone was wondering.

    Anyways I started to wonder about the reasons others do yoga. I started thinking in the context of the enneagram, but then my thoughts got wider.

    So, for what reasons do you do yoga?

    I will be a good sport and start.

    I am doing it because I really like the stretched out feeling afterwards and the fact that I have real difficulties when it comes to living in the now.

  2. #2
    Mastermind Fieldmarshal Sacrophagus's Avatar
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    the fact that I have real difficulties when it comes to living in the now.
    This. "It is difficult to attract our attention in the present moment", is what I used to say in the past. Later, I discovered that I can bring my awareness and train myself to do so, instead of subconsciously plotting future events and architecting the way they're going to play.

    Otherwise, I meditate to further reinforce my stillness.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spectre View Post
    I have just started to take yoga classes.
    It is something called MOJO yoga if anyone was wondering.

    Anyways I started to wonder about the reasons others do yoga. I started thinking in the context of the enneagram, but then my thoughts got wider.

    So, for what reasons do you do yoga?

    I will be a good sport and start.

    I am doing it because I really like the stretched out feeling afterwards and the fact that I have real difficulties when it comes to living in the now.
    I wouldn't really categorise yoga as a sport. In many ways, yoga is an anti-sport. (Sorry, I misread your OP.)

    I think the greatest benefit of yoga is that it requires you to move and connect with your body in a way that more instrumental types of exercise do not. This brings a whole lot of physical benefits, but also many mental benefits. For this reason, it's also being increasingly introduced into therapy programs (psychological and physical).

    I'm unfamiliar with MOJO yoga, but it sounds like a brand. There's many different styles of yoga. I've found that most gyms tend to offer either Vinyasa or a kind of Vinyasa-Hatha hybrid. Give different classes a try and find a style which works for you. Yoga is broad and inclusive. There's nothing to lose!

    Regarding struggles with "living in the now," I've done yoga for many years, on and off, and I still struggle with this. I think all people do. I'm not really a very "present" person by nature. I'm quite absent-minded. At the core of yoga is openness and non-judgement. You're not doing yoga wrong if you're not "in the moment." It's more a constant practice of gently returning your attention to where you are, and when it wanders, observing it with openness and non-judgement.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Spectre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sacrophagus View Post
    This. "It is difficult to attract our attention in the present moment", is what I used to say in the past. Later, I discovered that I can bring my awareness and train myself to do so, instead of subconsciously plotting future events and architecting the way they're going to play.

    Otherwise, I meditate to further reinforce my stillness.
    I must say; I love your avatar.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Spectre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingrid in grids View Post
    I wouldn't really categorise yoga as a sport. In many ways, yoga is an anti-sport. (Sorry, I misread your OP.)

    I think the greatest benefit of yoga is that it requires you to move and connect with your body in a way that more instrumental types of exercise do not. This brings a whole lot of physical benefits, but also many mental benefits. For this reason, it's also being increasingly introduced into therapy programs (psychological and physical).

    I'm unfamiliar with MOJO yoga, but it sounds like a brand. There's many different styles of yoga. I've found that most gyms tend to offer either Vinyasa or a kind of Vinyasa-Hatha hybrid. Give different classes a try and find a style which works for you. Yoga is broad and inclusive. There's nothing to lose!

    Regarding struggles with "living in the now," I've done yoga for many years, on and off, and I still struggle with this. I think all people do. I'm not really a very "present" person by nature. I'm quite absent-minded. At the core of yoga is openness and non-judgement. You're not doing yoga wrong if you're not "in the moment." It's more a constant practice of gently returning your attention to where you are, and when it wanders, observing it with openness and non-judgement.
    The MOJO classes are scripted by some companty, just like the bodybalance classes.

    Unfortunately, the gym I attend only has two kinds of yoga, MOJO and yin yoga...

    I too am absent minded. My fiveness is all too clear, its not even funny.

    I have felt that the bodybalance classes have helped me connect to my body, so I am hoping yoga will help as well.

    And I am trying to find ways to meet new people. That is another reason why I am trying out yoga.
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  6. #6
    ⋆✦⋆ Hiraeth's Avatar
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    I have been practicing yoga regularly for nearly five years now -- a variety of power vinyasa, hatha, and Ashtanga. I first started doing it out of curiousity and to search for an exercise I'd enjoy that wasn't overly strenuous, but still gave great benefits. After keeping a steady routine, I've found it became something even more than I initially expected and is now a part of my everyday life. The lessons it has taught me, the deep breathing and meditative qualities, learning to become more grounded and present, as well as improved flexibility and stronger muscles are all contributing factors I've gained from keeping up a regular practice.

    That's not to say it has been super easy either, having hit road bumps and hiccups along the way as well. I've encountered injuries, some from overdoing certain poses, and had to learn to keep going regardless of the setbacks. Forcing myself to do modifications and not giving into my ego by learning to let go of my perfectionistic tendencies was an incredibly humbling experience. I've grown so much from doing so little.

    Moreover, my experience has found its way into my everyday life as well. Yoga has played an extremely large part in diminishing my depression altogether, easing my anxiety, and getting through hardships at a much easier rate than I had ever imagined before. It's not merely through doing yoga itself, but from what I've obtained by doing yoga, and seeing the benefits in ALL aspects of my life. It has changed the person I once was into a more self-accepting, mindful, and peaceful individual that I am today.

    Yoga is a journey that has even become somewhat like a religion to me. I love it because it incorporates the mind, body, and spirit all in one, and I really believe that in order to become healthy and at peace with life, it's very important to have those three aspects of the human condition regulated.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Spectre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lotus View Post
    I have been practicing yoga regularly for nearly five years now -- a variety of power vinyasa, hatha, and Ashtanga. I first started doing it out of curiousity and to search for an exercise I'd enjoy that wasn't overly strenuous, but still gave great benefits. After keeping a steady routine, I've found it became something even more than I initially expected and is now a part of my everyday life. The lessons it has taught me, the deep breathing and meditative qualities, learning to become more grounded and present, as well as improved flexibility and stronger muscles are all contributing factors I've gained from keeping up a regular practice.

    That's not to say it has been super easy either, having hit road bumps and hiccups along the way as well. I've encountered injuries, some from overdoing certain poses, and had to learn to keep going regardless of the setbacks. Forcing myself to do modifications and not giving into my ego by learning to let go of my perfectionistic tendencies was an incredibly humbling experience. I've grown so much from doing so little.

    Moreover, my experience has found its way into my everyday life as well. Yoga has played an extremely large part in diminishing my depression altogether, easing my anxiety, and getting through hardships at a much easier rate than I had ever imagined before. It's not merely through doing yoga itself, but from what I've obtained by doing yoga, and seeing the benefits in ALL aspects of my life. It has changed the person I once was into a more self-accepting, mindful, and peaceful individual that I am today.

    Yoga is a journey that has even become somewhat like a religion to me. I love it because it incorporates the mind, body, and spirit all in one, and I really believe that in order to become healthy and at peace with life, it's very important to have those three aspects of the human condition regulated.
    Letting go of perfectionistic tendencies sounds pretty wonderful.

    Where do you draw the line between mind and spirit? I am curious because I have never really thought in those terms.
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  8. #8
    ⋆✦⋆ Hiraeth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spectre View Post
    Where do you draw the line between mind and spirit? I am curious because I have never really thought in those terms.
    The mind in connection to the spiritual is a large focal point in the kind of yoga that I practice. While the many modern forms of yoga today are largely concerned with the physical fitness aspect, its primary purpose was much greater -- to connect the mind, body, and breath together through a series of physical postures (asanas), meditation practices, and ways of living, thus leading to a deeper understanding of the true purpose of existence -- a union with something greater than ourselves. In fact, the very meaning of yoga is derived from the Sanskrit verb 'yuj,' meaning 'to unite' or 'to yoke.'

    Even though yoga has Hindu origins, its approach to life is meant to be universal and easily accessible for anyone. Overall, it's essentially a form of meditation while doing poses that may be deemed uncomfortable by the practitioner. You'd have to train your mind to overcome the power of the senses.

    I think Kino MacGregor said it best in this blog post of hers years ago, so I'll repost it here:

    Quote Originally Posted by Kino MacGregor
    If you come to the practice of yoga looking only for pleasure, yoga will eventually disappoint you. Sooner or later, you’ll get bored with the practice or you will experience pain or discomfort in a posture you previously found fun. The basic lesson of this centuries-old science of self-exploration is that if you heed the call of pleasure and pain, you will always be a slave to the sensory experience.

    If you instead learn to train the mind to be present, focused and equanimous regardless of the inevitable vicissitudes of life, then you will gain your freedom and ultimately experience your limitless, powerful higher self.

    Sincere spiritual investigation is a journey to your center. Along the road, all of your attachments and aversions will be challenged. Everything you know yourself to be will be questioned. It’s not for everyone.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Spectre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lotus View Post
    The mind in connection to the spiritual is a large focal point in the kind of yoga that I practice. While the many modern forms of yoga today are largely concerned with the physical fitness aspect, its primary purpose was much greater -- to connect the mind, body, and breath together through a series of physical postures (asanas), meditation practices, and ways of living, thus leading to a deeper understanding of the true purpose of existence -- a union with something greater than ourselves. In fact, the very meaning of yoga is derived from the Sanskrit verb 'yuj,' meaning 'to unite' or 'to yoke.'

    Even though yoga has Hindu origins, its approach to life is meant to be universal and easily accessible for anyone. Overall, it's essentially a form of meditation while doing poses that may be deemed uncomfortable by the practitioner. You'd have to train your mind to overcome the power of the senses.

    I think Kino MacGregor said it best in this blog post of hers years ago, so I'll repost it here:
    I will have to think a bit about that.
    It sounds a lot like an increase in will power.

  10. #10
    ⋆✦⋆ Hiraeth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spectre View Post
    I will have to think a bit about that.
    It sounds a lot like an increase in will power.
    Everything takes willpower though. Exercising, working, doing anything we don't want to do, etc. Willpower goes hand-in-hand with mindfulness. Also, think of it as a muscle that can be strengthened over time. Yoga helps in cultivating it.
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