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Thread: Feet and toes

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    Default Feet and toes

    What's the best treatments for your feet and toes? I have terrible problems with broken skin around the little toe or between the little toe and the next toe, I'm also a type two diabetic and I'm not sure if that's a contributing factor to this problem, anyway, does anyone know any good home treatments or advice for taking care of your feet?

    I'm going to go hiking at the weekend and plan to do more of that when the opportunity presents itself so I really want to pay attention to and take care of my feet.
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    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Diabetics have a lot of circulation problems, and extremities are the first to be affected in anything that involves poor circulation.. I would definitely take time, at least 3 times a week, to do some massaging down along your legs to try to promote the circulation. Soaking your feet in salts can do a lot of good as well (plus the salt helps kill off bacteria and other nasties) and it also softens the feet.. These two can be done together at the same time. (Also, in the long-term of things, exercising helps with circulation a LOT, especially cardio, so ensure you're getting plenty of that in to keep your hands and feet strong and healthy.)

    As far as calluses go.. they're good to have. You don't want tender delicate feet. but anything beyond a slight roughness is too much and unnecessary. You should be able to feel a difference in the skin (around your heels, balls, and toes) in comparison to the arch, and it should be slightly less sensitive to the touch (if you're ticklish, the callus should not be as sensitive as the arch, for example) but nothing more than that is really necessary, so any calluses especially ones that are cracking need to be attended to.. so after soaking your feet, exfoliating them off with a stone or other such rough object should help. A sloughing lotion should be applied once a week to prevent calluses from building up. Other techniques to prevent calluses from building up: moisturizers (read: petroleum jelly overnight with socks on) help, frequent exfoliation in trouble spots, and ensuring your boots/shoes fit well and aren't too loose.

    The cracking of the feet.. It needs moisture. Petroleum jelly takes a long time to sink in, but if you apply it the night before in copious amounts (like if you were a little kid and 'moderation' was a fancy greek word your parents just used yesterday in front of you) and wear a sock it won't get everywhere and itll have time to soak in overnight. In the morning, if the skin is bone dry and feels no different it means your feet REALLY needed moisture there (read: reapplication the next night is probably necessary). if there's a supple, moisturized feeling to the skin, then it's spot on and only a light lotion moisturizer needs to be applied to those areas (though re-applying the jelly won't harm them at all). If there is petroleum jelly left over, a quick wash of the feet will fix that and it means you don't really need to moisturize the skin at that time, or that it had its fill. This usually doesn't happen though.

    I don't know why people don't powder their feet anymore either.. It's absolutely essential if you're wearing closed-off shoes all day. Not only does it help prevent bacteria and fungi, and keep your feet from smelling caca, but it also prevents sweat from accumulating which can irritate your skin and manifest that irritation in several ways.

    ..I'm definitely late in answering, but hope this helps.
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    Good advice @kyuuei

    However, petroleum jelly contains carcinogens. Instead, I would recommend massaging castor oil (cold pressed and not the ingestible one!) on the feet in the evening and then wearing cotton socks all night long. It helps with moisturizing, it's natural, anti-inflammatory/antibacterial, helps relieve tired feet and also heals some skin issues (cuts, abrasions, etc.). Since castor oil increases the micro-circulation of the skin, it's good for diabetics as well.
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    Foot problems are common in diabetic diseases.so toe socks and diabetic socks both are helpful for those people who have to suffer from diabetic diseases.These socks are helpful for preventing blistering on the skin surface and reducing pressure in lower foot.

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    bag balm is good for moisturizing dry, chapped, and chafed skin.
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    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantonym View Post
    Good advice @kyuuei

    However, petroleum jelly contains carcinogens. Instead, I would recommend massaging castor oil (cold pressed and not the ingestible one!) on the feet in the evening and then wearing cotton socks all night long. It helps with moisturizing, it's natural, anti-inflammatory/antibacterial, helps relieve tired feet and also heals some skin issues (cuts, abrasions, etc.). Since castor oil increases the micro-circulation of the skin, it's good for diabetics as well.
    Ooh, I absolutely do NOT advise using castor oil. Although an oil, by itself it is quite irritating to many skin types, and with issues already present, that can cause even more damage. SOME people react well to it, some people find it dries the skin even more and causes lots of irritiation. It isn't a thing you want to experiment with on already damaged or irritated tissues--particularly diabetic ones with less sensation. Petroleum jelly is FDA approved and safe to use on the body and has not had any evidence of causing cancer. (Apples contain carcinogens.. just because it contains some does not mean it is unsafe to use for us humans.) More to the point, if you're wanting a more 'natural' whatever that means route, you can always use thicker natural lotions that are on the market like... I dunno.. whatever the whole foods version of Okeefes or Udderly Smooth is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Survive & Stay Free View Post
    What's the best treatments for your feet and toes? I have terrible problems with broken skin around the little toe or between the little toe and the next toe, I'm also a type two diabetic and I'm not sure if that's a contributing factor to this problem, anyway, does anyone know any good home treatments or advice for taking care of your feet?

    I'm going to go hiking at the weekend and plan to do more of that when the opportunity presents itself so I really want to pay attention to and take care of my feet.
    I know this is an old post but the cracks between toes can be fungal. With a doctors ok, any OTC anti-fungal cream (Tinactin, Lotrimin) should work fine. Have a look at your toenails - are they discolored, thick or brittle? That's toenail fungus. Same cream can be applied but this can be a very committed problem and hard to get rid of - might take a prescription. Gold Bond makes excellent diabetic skin products - you can buy online.
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