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  1. #81
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Mostly English, with a good dose of Scott/Irish, and 1/4096 Native American. (Direct descendant of Pocahontas. Yes, they made a cartoon out of my great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandmother.)
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  2. #82
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Mostly English, with a good dose of Scott/Irish, and 1/4096 Native American. (Direct descendant of Pocahontas. Yes, they made a cartoon out of my great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandmother.)
    Really!?! So great. Thanks for dropping in here Do you have stories handed down?

    I am intrigued (delighted) with how many people have Indigenous Culture in their backgrounds. I make this joke sometimes that I am: 82,456th in line to the throne (cuz aren't we all ) I am seeing the same dynamic with Native threads. It's welcome.


  3. #83
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    Too many talk about them talk about them almost like they don't exist anymore don't real have that much relevance in today's world, lol.

    There's still quite a few of them around, they just like to keep a low profile I think.

    In Canada, their presence is generally more well known about, I'm guessing unlike in the States maybe? They protest a lot, and surprisingly seem to be one of the most democratic groups or people in Canada. I mean at least, that's what you'd notice the most, or be the most perhaps prolific of the as a group, but it's pretty cool I think. They're still the one's who make the most of their democratic and individual freedom and voices. Anyway, they do other things and are not just some ancient group in the past, they are again just sort of on the down low. I think they like it like that.
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  4. #84
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    @Zeno

    50% korean

    White grandparent #1 (confirmed)

    50% english
    50% german

    White grandparent #2 (unconfirmed aka she's not 100% sure, but this is the best I have to go with)

    Austrian/Hungarian
    Lithuanian
    Polish
    What a beautifully rich combination!

    Oh I forgot to post how it influences me. So I'll do that. My mom is where I get my korean genetics from. Uniquely enough, she spoke English very well, because that's what she majored in University. So I didn't realize that people having different ethnicity in parents was really a uncommon thing. I kind of grew up thinking that it was standard for everyone to be mixed, it wasn't until later that I started noticing that a lot of people, including everyone in my extended family at the time, were not mixed.
    I'm so glad you participated. Thanks! I find this ^ eternally amazing. How children don't even register racial differences initially. My Brother is married to a wonderful Girl from Taiwan and they have a new child, so the concept of being 'mixed' is one I have high interest in.

    I always am intrigued to observe different people's reactions to my Brother's marriage.

    Being mixed has had different affects on me throughout my life. My brother appears more western than I do, I take after my mom a lot. But especially when I was younger, I appeared quite Asian, perhaps even full Asian. Therefore, I dealt with many of the Asian stereotypes in school, such as being a brainiac, good at math, etc. I always wanted to defy these stereotypes, because I wasn't even full Asian, but in many ways they were true at the time.
    So, do you think that ultimately the stereotypes were a positive influence?

    That said, a lot of people can usually tell I'm not full Asian, and don't put me in a box. However, not being in a box is it's own dilemma. It's a common gripe among the happa community that they don't fit anywhere. So ironically, I did kind of break out of the box, but coincidentally I don't really belong anywhere, ethnically. That said I grew up in one of the most diverse areas of the country, and while there were some cliques basesd on ethnicity, it wasn't that bad. All in all it hasn't affected me too much. One of the funniest things I've ever encountered was when I was at a diner in a very white republican area, and all I got was looks from the moment I stepped in the door. I was wondering if it's that bad for an Asian guy I wonder what it's like to be black in that situation.
    Ha! It's really diverse where I live too.

    Still, I do notice undercurrents. Not long ago, my SIL was having a hard time at Customer Service. She was being accused of trying to cheat the business when really she was trying to do an exchange. I had been shopping around and then walked up to see what was taking so long? When I walked up, the representative looked surprised we were together and immediately let me explain what we wanted done and promptly fulfilled the transaction. But, my SIL had been saying exactly the same thing

    Have you ever been to Korea or the European countries in your background @Zeno?

  5. #85
    Senior Member evilrubberduckie's Avatar
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    Im Lebanese.

    That's it. Maybe a VERY small percentage of french since my moms side has colored eyes, but that in itself is common among the Lebanese. It's all guesswork.

    Everything about me is Lebanese... country pride, heritage, culture, religion, language, food, features... all of it. It's defiantly shaped me into who I am today. Being the first American born in the family on my dad's AND moms side is cool. I relate to being Lebanese more then American just because I was raised around middle eastern society in my younger days more then the other. Doesnt mean I hate being american, I can eat raw cookie dough from a tube, and buy my cheese pre sliced. America is fucking awesome.
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  6. #86
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    Really!?! So great. Thanks for dropping in here Do you have stories handed down?

    I am intrigued (delighted) with how many people have Indigenous Culture in their backgrounds. I make this joke sometimes that I am: 82,456th in line to the throne (cuz aren't we all ) I am seeing the same dynamic with Native threads. It's welcome.
    Oh, forget that "princess" shit. My cousins were enthralled by the fact that it meant they were descended from an "Indian Chief".

    Oh, and I purposefully didn't mention other royal ancestry, such as King John (you know, the one who f-cked up so bad he managed to piss off the Pope AND all of his Lords and thereby had to sign the Magna Carta to make things sane again ... and then there were those Robin Hood stories set back when he was just a Prince ...). Which in turn implies being descended from William the Conqueror and Charlemagne.

    All of which means nothing: prolific ancestors were prolific. Just do the generational math and their theoretical descendants outnumber the population of the globe. If you can trace your ancestry back that far, that means that you had royal/noble blood, since those were the only people who could afford to keep track of that shit so long ago.

    No stories, just extremely obscure pedigree (you have to follow one very specific line in my genealogy that far back to hit the royal stuff) ... oh, and relatives curious enough to research it.

    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.
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  7. #87
    breaking out of my cocoon SearchingforPeace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Oh, forget that "princess" shit. My cousins were enthralled by the fact that it meant they were descended from an "Indian Chief".

    Oh, and I purposefully didn't mention other royal ancestry, such as King John (you know, the one who f-cked up so bad he managed to piss off the Pope AND all of his Lords and thereby had to sign the Magna Carta to make things sane again ... and then there were those Robin Hood stories set back when he was just a Prince ...). Which in turn implies being descended from William the Conqueror and Charlemagne.

    All of which means nothing: prolific ancestors were prolific. Just do the generational math and their theoretical descendants outnumber the population of the globe. If you can trace your ancestry back that far, that means that you had royal/noble blood, since those were the only people who could afford to keep track of that shit so long ago.

    No stories, just extremely obscure pedigree (you have to follow one very specific line in my genealogy that far back to hit the royal stuff) ... oh, and relatives curious enough to research it.

    Ha, cousin!!! (10th or 20th I guess). I am also descended from William the Conqueror. Let's unite and kick those German pretenders off our throne!!!
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    And I am not a hedgehog......

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  8. #88
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by evilrubberduckie View Post
    Im Lebanese.

    That's it. Maybe a VERY small percentage of french since my moms side has colored eyes, but that in itself is common among the Lebanese. It's all guesswork.

    Everything about me is Lebanese... country pride, heritage, culture, religion, language, food, features... all of it. It's defiantly shaped me into who I am today. Being the first American born in the family on my dad's AND moms side is cool. I relate to being Lebanese more then American just because I was raised around middle eastern society in my younger days more then the other. Doesnt mean I hate being american, I can eat raw cookie dough from a tube, and buy my cheese pre sliced. America is fucking awesome.
    Cool Duckie! I adore Lebanese peeps = some of the most hospitable and loving. And, the food The first time I got invited over to some friend's they said 'come over for coffee'. So, I ate first and went expecting to drink coffee. I got there and the tables were laden, overflowing with food. Stuffed pastries, roasted meats, salads, dips, desserts... Now, I know not to eat anything that day, if I am going over.

    Is pre-sliced cheese an American thing (grin)? I did not know that Thank you so much for dipping in to this thread
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  9. #89
    Senior Member Zeno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post

    What a beautifully rich combination!
    Haha, thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    I'm so glad you participated. Thanks! I find this ^ eternally amazing. How children don't even register racial differences initially. My Brother is married to a wonderful Girl from Taiwan and they have a new child, so the concept of being 'mixed' is one I have high interest in.

    I always am intrigued to observe different people's reactions to my Brother's marriage.
    Ya honestly I think the views on racially mixed families depend on the mix and the place. For example, in America, there's still people who frown at those families that have a white parent and a black parent. Meanwhile, I don't think in America there's as much of that connotation for mixes of white and Asian. However, in Asia there's a bit of a different connotation for mixes of white and asian. Particularly in my Asian side (Korea) they view themselves as one blood. They literally all see themselves as a larger family, one people. However, half white half asian people are not really in that group. When I've gone to Korea my brother and I have been called half-bloods. So we aren't really in that network so to say. That's not to say it's an inherently negative connotation. My brother and I have been called handsome many times due to our mix, and in many ways we're seen in a positive connotation because we're American (which is a country they generally like) and because Koreans kind of like the appearance of white people (in my opinion). I don't think this is just unique to Korea. There's a lot of very famous models, actors, and singers in Asia who are a mix of white and asian.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    So, do you think that ultimately the stereotypes were a positive influence?
    Hm I'm really not sure. I had a lot of cognitive dissonance when I was younger regarding the stereotypes. I really hated being told I was in a box (YET HERE I AM AT TYPOC), and I just didn't like the idea of people acting like they knew me before they knew me. So I really acted out as a kid. I'd say it was pretty negative, until I came to acceptance with the stereotypes, and realized it really wasn't a bad thing to be those things.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    Still, I do notice undercurrents. Not long ago, my SIL was having a hard time at Customer Service. She was being accused of trying to cheat the business when really she was trying to do an exchange. I had been shopping around and then walked up to see what was taking so long? When I walked up, the representative looked surprised we were together and immediately let me explain what we wanted done and promptly fulfilled the transaction. But, my SIL had been saying exactly the same thing
    Yeah I mean I believe they're subconsciously there. Thankfully I really have been around a diverse areas and I don't really stand out or get treated differently because of my ethnicity. Although, I did move to a place that was almost all white, during University. I believe the University that I attended was like 75% white, 15% black, 5 % latino, 5% asian. But I got treated great. I mean some places that have a southern culture can be really really friendly. In fact, one of my cousins on my white side swears that when he gets older he's going to move to the south, (I'm in the NE) because the North East is so unfriendly and uncaring. So I mean other than the diner where I got stared at, I got treated well when I was in a dominantly white area. I don't know if that would be the same if I were half black or not, but at least for my mix I'm not treated too bad. And that reminds me, I've known two people who were half black half asian. Both were really awesome people. I remember one of them was half korean and she and I use to joke that we were brother and sister.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    Have you ever been to Korea or the European countries in your background
    So I haven't been to Europe at all. I've gone to Korea about 5 times in my life, and I might be going there again in a couple of months. I've always been amazed by how fast it has changed. It was very different when I was young, compared to the recent time I visited. I mean I've even noticed the culture change, where in many respects the youth act VERY like the youth in America. Always staring at their phone, wearing very stylish clothes and hair styles. Really interesting stuff. One of my most memorable experiences, is when I was staying at a very fancy hotel my first time in Korea, I was probably around 10. And right across the street, I was in a parking lot for the hotel, there was a hut. It was raining very hard, and I noticed a old lady in the hut peeling onions. I don't think that noticing such a stark contrast in wealth ever affected me as much as it did then.


    So story time, I know its already a long post, but I figure you guys might find this funny / interesting, I know most people in my family do.

    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Oh, and I purposefully didn't mention other royal ancestry, such as King John
    So I'm related to a king as well. It's not very far up my line. He was my great-great-great grandfather, I believe; and he was on my German side. He wasn't a great king by any means, and by great I mean a king of a large kingdom. He was a king of a smaller kingdom, at the time when Germany was ruled by many different kingdoms. Apparently Bismark, I believe, called on all the kings to help in a war. So my grandfather (I will call him grandfather so I don't have to use great so much), left his kingdom to go fight, and left his brother in charge while he was gone. When the war was over he came back, however, his brother banished him and claimed the kingdom. My grandfather then went to America with nothing but a silver spoon (literally). Eventually the American Civil War occurred. My grandfather had extensive military experience, and offered to take the place of a rich man's son for money. The offer was accepted, and he was put in the Union cavalry as an officer. He eventually got shot in his back, I believe, and ever since had to use a cane to walk. Now my great grandfather was raised by my great-great-great grandfather (the german king), because my great-grandfather's father (my great-great-grandfather) died before he was born. Now from what I hear, my great-great-great grandfather was a real hard ass, real strict German (in fact pretty much all the males on my father's line are real hard asses). So he was raised getting beat up by a cane and such. Anyway, with the money from the civil war my great-grandfather and great-great-great grandfather started investing in apartments in the Bronx. Apparently they became very very wealthy. I'm talking about equivalent of 5-10 million current USD. However, they stored their money in the banks. When the run on the banks occurred during the great depression my great-grandfather lost all of his money. He apparently suffered a nervous break down, and my grandfather suffered the consequences. My great-grandfathers wife (or my grandfather's mother) died working in a factory. She worked underneath a vent which blew in cool air, and got pneumonia, she died very shortly after. So my grandfather's life was very harsh, because his father was abusive from the nervous breakdown, and his loving mother died when he was around 15. So in short my grandfather became a real hard ass to my dad because his dad was a hardass, and that explains why my dad is such a hard ass!

    End of story!

  10. #90
    / nonsequitur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    I wish I could convey how helpful this was to me in understanding my SIL's parenting style I thank you from my heart for sharing = providing me with insight
    Not at all. I'm glad that you find it useful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    It's lovely when children are responsible and wise with finances = and then CAN show filial gratitude!
    Actually, it's almost like a social contract between child and parents. We have a responsibility to provide for them financially or we are considered unfilial and are shamed by others. I would prefer to think that I give money to my parents because I want to support them, but because everything is framed in the context of social obligation it feels very cold and insincere.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    The bold is what I really recognize in my SIL and her family. I so appreciate you putting the words to what I have been trying to discern. The Asian side thinks our side is overly complimentary and focuses too much on the inner person. My side of the family is fascinated by the push to excel and long-term thinking. But, honestly, everyone is united for the one cause and I think the differences combine to form a great environment to grow within.
    Yep, because in pro-social Eastern cultures we are defined primarily by our social and familial roles and less individualistically, there is conflict when people try to break from expectations. You're automatically seen as selfish and inconsiderate. People are expected to listen to their elders because it's the role of the older person to lead and make decisions. Conversely, older people are supposed to take this responsibility seriously and clearly define expectations for their children or the younger generation. Sometimes I find Western cultures a bit too individualistic, but overall, I think such freedoms are important because ultimately no one can take responsibility for another person's life.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudpatrol View Post
    Cool. I respect this because ultimately: only we can be responsible for the consequences of our decision making processes.
    Exactly!
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    "That didn't break it. It's what made it work."

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