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  1. #21
    Can't be satisfied. Peter Deadpan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaotic Symphony View Post
    @Peter Deadpan and I know someone else said it but post is gone...

    I have never heard the term, what differentiates complex PTSD from normal PTSD?
    PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who experienced a singular traumatic event (seeing someone be killed, for example). C-PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who was trapped in a traumatic situation for an extended period of time (being a prisoner of war, or having a highly traumatic childhood, or being stuck in an abusive relationship, for example). With C-PTSD, the flashbacks involved are not visual in nature, but rather emotional. So, when something happens that reminds the individual of the traumatic time, the individual will respond with emotions (including anxiety and depression) as opposed to visual flashbacks, but it's still like being thrown into the past and feeling what the individual felt at the time of trauma.

    This is a very basic explanation of the difference, but there's a fair amount of information available online should you decide to research further. Many people with C-PTSD do not know they have it because of the lack of flashbacks/nightmares, and because they aren't able to draw connection between the reaction in the moment, the trigger in the moment, and the connected trauma/feelings from the past. Most of them suffer from toxic shame because they feel broken and are embarrassed and confused, so they withdraw and do not open up to others about it.
    Perpetual mood


    “Sometimes I think I have felt everything I'm ever gonna feel.
    And from here on out, I'm not gonna feel anything new.
    Just lesser versions of what I've already felt.”


    - look it up yourself



  2. #22
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    I've been told by professionals that I look normal because i hide things so well to a point then i have a major breakdown and either get an emergency appointment or get hospitalized

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Deadpan View Post
    PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who experienced a singular traumatic event (seeing someone be killed, for example). C-PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who was trapped in a traumatic situation for an extended period of time (being a prisoner of war, or having a highly traumatic childhood, or being stuck in an abusive relationship, for example). With C-PTSD, the flashbacks involved are not visual in nature, but rather emotional. So, when something happens that reminds the individual of the traumatic time, the individual will respond with emotions (including anxiety and depression) as opposed to visual flashbacks, but it's still like being thrown into the past and feeling what the individual felt at the time of trauma.

    This is a very basic explanation of the difference, but there's a fair amount of information available online should you decide to research further. Many people with C-PTSD do not know they have it because of the lack of flashbacks/nightmares, and because they aren't able to draw connection between the reaction in the moment, the trigger in the moment, and the connected trauma/feelings from the past. Most of them suffer from toxic shame because they feel broken and are embarrassed and confused, so they withdraw and do not open up to others about it.
    I appreciate you explaining this because...this sounds almost exactly the sort of PTSD I actually experience... so... That kind of helps too. Thanks.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Deadpan View Post
    PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who experienced a singular traumatic event (seeing someone be killed, for example). C-PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who was trapped in a traumatic situation for an extended period of time (being a prisoner of war, or having a highly traumatic childhood, or being stuck in an abusive relationship, for example). With C-PTSD, the flashbacks involved are not visual in nature, but rather emotional. So, when something happens that reminds the individual of the traumatic time, the individual will respond with emotions (including anxiety and depression) as opposed to visual flashbacks, but it's still like being thrown into the past and feeling what the individual felt at the time of trauma.

    This is a very basic explanation of the difference, but there's a fair amount of information available online should you decide to research further. Many people with C-PTSD do not know they have it because of the lack of flashbacks/nightmares, and because they aren't able to draw connection between the reaction in the moment, the trigger in the moment, and the connected trauma/feelings from the past. Most of them suffer from toxic shame because they feel broken and are embarrassed and confused, so they withdraw and do not open up to others about it.
    This C-PTSD, is it the same as complex trauma?

    I've read a little about that and had a little experience of it in family, friends, myself, although I think that I've experienced symptoms or aspects of both PTSD and C-PTSD, I'm not sure of the relationship between the two or if they correspond to organic/biological diagnostic criteria/symptomatology or something else.
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  5. #25
    Twerking & Lurking ayoitsStepho's Avatar
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    I definitely have PTSD from a singular event, but a lot has been coming out about childhood abuse I endured growing up and the possibility that I wasn't just depressed with anxiety, but that I've been dealing with symptoms of Complex PTSD since I was about 12. It's been one hell of a year.
    Likes prplchknz, Chaotic Symphony, Zhaylin liked this post

  6. #26
    Moderator Yuu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Deadpan View Post
    PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who experienced a singular traumatic event (seeing someone be killed, for example). C-PTSD is the diagnosis for someone who was trapped in a traumatic situation for an extended period of time (being a prisoner of war, or having a highly traumatic childhood, or being stuck in an abusive relationship, for example). With C-PTSD, the flashbacks involved are not visual in nature, but rather emotional. So, when something happens that reminds the individual of the traumatic time, the individual will respond with emotions (including anxiety and depression) as opposed to visual flashbacks, but it's still like being thrown into the past and feeling what the individual felt at the time of trauma.

    This is a very basic explanation of the difference, but there's a fair amount of information available online should you decide to research further. Many people with C-PTSD do not know they have it because of the lack of flashbacks/nightmares, and because they aren't able to draw connection between the reaction in the moment, the trigger in the moment, and the connected trauma/feelings from the past. Most of them suffer from toxic shame because they feel broken and are embarrassed and confused, so they withdraw and do not open up to others about it.
    The latter does sound familiar.

    I wonder if it is often dismissed because so many people asociate PTSD with the visual flashbacks.
    " Do something, even if it's wrong."

    " I don't wanna have to but I will, if that's what I'm supposed to do
    We don't wanna set up for the kill, but that's what I'm 'bout to do."
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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yuu View Post
    The latter does sound familiar.

    I wonder if it is often dismissed because so many people asociate PTSD with the visual flashbacks.
    The way I've understood it to date is that trauma from a single incident will under normal circumstances for a resilient individual recede, possibly without manifesting symptoms, including "flash bubble memories", although short lived nightmares and aversion are a thing.

    The disordered bit in post-traumatic stress is that it is persistent and involves the symptoms people are more familiar with, ie flashbubble memories, aversions that become habitual and triggers to re-experience stress and anxiety.

    Complex trauma, as I understand it, may or may not involve development trauma, which can include attachment disorders or disorganized attachment styles, is more to do with persisting change to brain and body chemistry. It can involve changes to cortisol or serotonin uptake in the brain, which has motivational knock on effects for people who might already be self-medicating or becoming habituated to certain sorts of thinking or feeling or acting.

    The C-PTSD is something I've not heard about to now but seems to maybe be explaining the same things or at least possesses some overlap with the ideas I am familiar with and the emotional memory idea and affective responses rather than visual or cerebral responses is something that definitely interests me and is new to me at this point. I really appreciate people posting stuff like this, its a real chance to learn and illuminates experience I've had no end
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  8. #28
    Moderator Yuu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    The way I've understood it to date is that trauma from a single incident will under normal circumstances for a resilient individual recede, possibly without manifesting symptoms, including "flash bubble memories", although short lived nightmares and aversion are a thing.

    The disordered bit in post-traumatic stress is that it is persistent and involves the symptoms people are more familiar with, ie flashbubble memories, aversions that become habitual and triggers to re-experience stress and anxiety.

    Complex trauma, as I understand it, may or may not involve development trauma, which can include attachment disorders or disorganized attachment styles, is more to do with persisting change to brain and body chemistry. It can involve changes to cortisol or serotonin uptake in the brain, which has motivational knock on effects for people who might already be self-medicating or becoming habituated to certain sorts of thinking or feeling or acting.

    The C-PTSD is something I've not heard about to now but seems to maybe be explaining the same things or at least possesses some overlap with the ideas I am familiar with and the emotional memory idea and affective responses rather than visual or cerebral responses is something that definitely interests me and is new to me at this point. I really appreciate people posting stuff like this, its a real chance to learn and illuminates experience I've had no end
    Thanks for the information.

    The aversion thing stands out to me and is something many people have suggested to me.

    I am REALLY bad at taking medication I need to live. It isn't out of obstinace, it isn't even intentional. I TRIED every thing to make taking it a habit but nothing works. I know I'll end up dead if I don't take it so I am desperate to find a solution but NOTHING works. It's like when it comes to this medication it just does not exist in my mind.

    Growing up the stuff was an enormous negative influence. My Grandmother was abusive about it, screaming, insulting, berating me about it, treating it like my only purpose for living, like I was nothing without it. I was even grounded for a year and half for not taking it once.

    My close friends have suggested that the past abuse is why I don't take it.

    My obvious response to this was always " That makes no sense. My grandmother became abusive BECAUSE I didn't take it. So logically I should want to take it out of that fear."
    That is when some suggested the idea of avoidance, that it was something SO negative that my subconscious just refuses to deal with it at all. I would be very appreciative of anyone's input on how to deal with it because, ya know, I'll die if I don't figure it out.

    This is the first time I have heard of C-PTSD myself but it makes a lot of sense. TBH, I never knew there was a difference between PTSD and complex PTSD. I just assumed that it could be either on set by one instance or several over time.
    " Do something, even if it's wrong."

    " I don't wanna have to but I will, if that's what I'm supposed to do
    We don't wanna set up for the kill, but that's what I'm 'bout to do."

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yuu View Post
    Thanks for the information.

    The aversion thing stands out to me and is something many people have suggested to me.

    I am REALLY bad at taking medication I need to live. It isn't out of obstinace, it isn't even intentional. I TRIED every thing to make taking it a habit but nothing works. I know I'll end up dead if I don't take it so I am desperate to find a solution but NOTHING works. It's like when it comes to this medication it just does not exist in my mind.

    Growing up the stuff was an enormous negative influence. My Grandmother was abusive about it, screaming, insulting, berating me about it, treating it like my only purpose for living, like I was nothing without it. I was even grounded for a year and half for not taking it once.

    My close friends have suggested that the past abuse is why I don't take it.

    My obvious response to this was always " That makes no sense. My grandmother became abusive BECAUSE I didn't take it. So logically I should want to take it out of that fear."
    That is when some suggested the idea of avoidance, that it was something SO negative that my subconscious just refuses to deal with it at all. I would be very appreciative of anyone's input on how to deal with it because, ya know, I'll die if I don't figure it out.

    This is the first time I have heard of C-PTSD myself but it makes a lot of sense. TBH, I never knew there was a difference between PTSD and complex PTSD. I just assumed that it could be either on set by one instance or several over time.
    I've heard it described as Trauma and Complex Trauma but have never heard of complex ptsd or the shorthand of c-ptsd but I didnt think there was ptsd and c-ptsd but it could make sense.

    PTSD itself is a disorder in the processing of traumatic stress, which a lot of people who experience trauma are more or less able to do without ever developing a disorderly processing faculty. If that makes sense. Its the persistent factor issue that matters. In that respect.

    In terms of aversion its a habit formation thing, so far as I know, so most remedies for it are along the lines of behaviour modification ideas and conditioning. Sorry if that's not helpful.

    I've read, a little, about something called "behavioural activation" in relation to PTSD, its mainly about identifying triggers, which you are likely to be avoiding intentionally or unintentionally, that cut into or against rewards which are usually reinforcing rewards, like say socializing, getting motivated, mainly by or through tracking and successfully surmounting difficulties and tracking it. Its similar to some weight loss regimes or fitness training. That's a rude summary but its one of the only behaviour modification ideas I'm familiar with in relation to PTSD.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Zhaylin's Avatar
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    @Yuu have you tried setting the most annoying alarm/timer you can find? Like, set it to go off right before bedtime (or breakfast etc- whenever you're supposed to take it). Then train yourself NOT to turn the alarm off until you've actually swallowed the medicine.
    Alarms helped me, a great deal, until it became a hardwired habit and I could stop using them.
    I don't have PTSD though.

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