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  1. #1
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    Default Type 8's and being gentle or some shit

    So what's it mean to show strength by being gentle?

    I'm a gymnastics instructor and I've tried being gentle. shit doesn't work. You gotta tell that bitchass kid to pull his pants up, stop picking his nose, stfu and do a back hip circle or else I'm gonna tell his mom he's being a little faggot.

    Ideas?

    I'm hoping that if I pet him on the head or something he'll magically do what I want.

  2. #2
    meinmeinmein! mmhmm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Arendee View Post
    You gotta tell that bitchass kid to pull his pants up, stop picking his nose, stfu and do a back hip circle or else I'm gonna tell his mom he's being a little faggot.

    you should take a video and show us.
    every normal man must be tempted, at times,
    to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag,
    and begin slitting throats.
    h.l. mencken

  3. #3
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    To me, this term is easiest to understand when applied to anger.

    Moreso that I am showing strength to my family/friends/whoever I care about by NOT being angry with them or acting the way I want to at times. Everyone knows that acting angry and yelling doesn't always get the results you really want.. sometimes you say the same shit in a different way, and everything comes together nicely. So, sometimes you have to be stronger than you really want to be and just learn how to buck up and do the 'adult thing' and treat the situation with grace. Especially if it is a situation where you don't particularly feel graceful.
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  4. #4
    Its time. Cassandra's Avatar
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    ^

    It's reigning in that power and anger, being aware of your size and force (be it physical or sheer personality) in order to protect and be careful with what/who is valuable.

    Think about the care and gentleness the fiercest predators show their helpless newborns, despite all their claws, fangs and raw aggression

  5. #5
    Driving to Wewelsburg Typh0n's Avatar
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    And sometimes, you just gotta tell the damn kids to stfu.
    And now there came out of this building a form - human - was it human? ... It reminded me of symbolical images of Genius or Demon that are seen on Etruscan vases or limned on the walls of Eastern sepulchres - images that borrow the outlines of man, and are yet of another race.

    -Edward Bulwer, Lord Lytton, The Coming Race

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    As anyone who's ever owned and loved one of the stereotypically "vicious" dog breeds can tell you, training and socialization can do a lot
    “The phrase 'Someone ought to do something' was not, by itself, a helpful one. People who used it never added the rider 'and that someone is me'.” - Terry Pratchett

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    i love skylights's Avatar
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    There's the option of being both tough and gentle in terms of being strict about following the rules but being kind and trying to understand him and love him and work with him to develop his best self.

    So sure, tell him to stfu, but also try to get in touch with his core motivation. Until you tap that it's going to be touch-and-go in terms of getting him to do things.

  8. #8
    Driving to Wewelsburg Typh0n's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    There's the option of being both tough and gentle in terms of being strict about following the rules but being kind and trying to understand him and love him and work with him to develop his best self.

    So sure, tell him to stfu, but also try to get in touch with his core motivation. Until you tap that it's going to be touch-and-go in terms of getting him to do things.
    In my teens I behaved like a total ass. It annoyed the hell out of people, and now, Im well behaved for the most part, but I see these kids in the street or public transportation behaving like animals, and it annoyes the crap out of me. I think the problem has nothing to do with these kids inner motivations, its just that noone ever tells them theyre a nuisance, their parents, their teachers, the cops etc do nothing and thats the gist of the problem.
    And now there came out of this building a form - human - was it human? ... It reminded me of symbolical images of Genius or Demon that are seen on Etruscan vases or limned on the walls of Eastern sepulchres - images that borrow the outlines of man, and are yet of another race.

    -Edward Bulwer, Lord Lytton, The Coming Race

  9. #9
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Typh0n View Post
    In my teens I behaved like a total ass. It annoyed the hell out of people, and now, Im well behaved for the most part, but I see these kids in the street or public transportation behaving like animals, and it annoyes the crap out of me. I think the problem has nothing to do with these kids inner motivations, its just that noone ever tells them theyre a nuisance, their parents, their teachers, the cops etc do nothing and thats the gist of the problem.
    I'm sure you're right in some cases, but I think there's a balance to be struck. I've worked and interned in recreational therapy and guidance counseling with kids, and while many need structure and boundaries, there's also often a bad combination of no behavior management plus no positive encouragement - people figuring that not be harsh on the kids is enough to inspire them to grow positively. Around here, there has been a lot of cracking down on behavior at schools by administration, with lots of authority figures telling kids they're a nuisance, and the kids feeling a lot of pressure and negativity and not a lot of reward or support. That sort of system doesn't make anyone want to behave well. There's an old phrase about using both the carrot and the stick - it's commonly used in reference to politics, but I think it's applicable here. If you just use the stick, the mule has no motivation besides punishment. Provide a carrot too, and you're providing a reason to move forwards as well as a reason not to move back.

    I think it's important to pull back and look at the bigger picture. If you're an instructor, one of your goals is to teach the kid a particular move, sure. But ultimately, it's more important to have a happy, motivated, well-behaved kid than a kid that can do a backflip. Maybe in the moment you do need to tell him to shut his mouth and get down to business. But that's not going to work every time, and it's not going to work for long before the kid gets pissed. Encourage him that it's his dream to become a breakdancer and this will help get him there, and he will want to do what you want him to do. It's the art of getting someone else on your side by assessing how things can be mutually beneficial.

    After all, what's the point of being hard on a kid if he's miserable and ends up dropping out? You'll ruin the whole point of the endeavor. I seem to remember that being a struggle for 8s. The 8 will voice something like "I'm doing this for the family", but the family is miserable, having been alienated by the hardness the 8 has developed in trying to protect their family. The "gentle" comes in when you reconnect with the softer side that knows how to collaborate with others.

    That's just my theorizing, anyway.

  10. #10
    Driving to Wewelsburg Typh0n's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    I'm sure you're right in some cases, but I think there's a balance to be struck. I've worked and interned in recreational therapy and guidance counseling with kids, and while many need structure and boundaries, there's also often a bad combination of no behavior management plus no positive encouragement - people figuring that not be harsh on the kids is enough to inspire them to grow positively. Around here, there has been a lot of cracking down on behavior at schools by administration, with lots of authority figures telling kids they're a nuisance, and the kids feeling a lot of pressure and negativity and not a lot of reward or support. That sort of system doesn't make anyone want to behave well. There's an old phrase about using both the carrot and the stick - it's commonly used in reference to politics, but I think it's applicable here. If you just use the stick, the mule has no motivation besides punishment. Provide a carrot too, and you're providing a reason to move forwards as well as a reason not to move back.

    I think it's important to pull back and look at the bigger picture. If you're an instructor, one of your goals is to teach the kid a particular move, sure. But ultimately, it's more important to have a happy, motivated, well-behaved kid than a kid that can do a backflip. Maybe in the moment you do need to tell him to shut his mouth and get down to business. But that's not going to work every time, and it's not going to work for long before the kid gets pissed. Encourage him that it's his dream to become a breakdancer and this will help get him there, and he will want to do what you want him to do. It's the art of getting someone else on your side by assessing how things can be mutually beneficial.

    After all, what's the point of being hard on a kid if he's miserable and ends up dropping out? You'll ruin the whole point of the endeavor. I seem to remember that being a struggle for 8s. The 8 will voice something like "I'm doing this for the family", but the family is miserable, having been alienated by the hardness the 8 has developed in trying to protect their family. The "gentle" comes in when you reconnect with the softer side that knows how to collaborate with others.

    That's just my theorizing, anyway.
    I agree with the carrot and the stick arguement, but I think we're just talking about two different things.
    And now there came out of this building a form - human - was it human? ... It reminded me of symbolical images of Genius or Demon that are seen on Etruscan vases or limned on the walls of Eastern sepulchres - images that borrow the outlines of man, and are yet of another race.

    -Edward Bulwer, Lord Lytton, The Coming Race

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