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  1. #1
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    Default A Wrinkle in Time (2018 Movie)

    A Wrinkle in Time starts playing today!

    This is the second known version of the movie based on my favorite book from childhood.

    The first version was okay... I appreciated it and enjoyed it. There were some things about it that felt standardized, though, rather than feeling like they were being true to the book's idiosyncrasies.

    I think the problem with the first movie was a slight reliance on saccharine emotional innuendo to make up for not having the budget to create true-to-the-book physical settings.

    I hope this one tells the story more like the book does. If not, I hope it's really good anyway.

    I'm planning on going to see it today.

    I'm excited!

    Last edited by Metis; 03-10-2018 at 08:48 AM.

  2. #2
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    I barely remember it from childhood. Only Where the Wild Things Are and The Witch and the Wardrobe really stand out now though I remember my mom read to me often when I was little and I learned to read really early on.

    I hope you find the movie enjoyable.
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    From Madeleine L'Engle's Obituary in The New York Times,
    "Madeleine L’Engle, Author of the Classic ‘A Wrinkle in Time,’ Is Dead at 88"
    By Douglas Martin, Sept. 8, 2007


    “A Wrinkle in Time” was rejected by 26 publishers before editors at Farrar, Straus & Giroux read it and enthusiastically accepted it. It proved to be her masterpiece, winning the John Newbery Medal as the best children’s book of 1963 and selling, so far, eight million copies. It is now in its 69th printing.

    (...)

    The St. James Guide to Children’s Writers called Ms. L’Engle “one of the truly important writers of juvenile fiction in recent decades.” Such accolades did not come from pulling punches. “Wrinkle” has been one of the most banned books in the United States, accused by religious conservatives of offering an inaccurate portrayal of God and nurturing in the young an unholy belief in myth and fantasy.

    Ms. L’Engle, who often wrote about her Christian faith, was taken aback by the attacks. “It seems people are willing to damn the book without reading it,” Ms. L’Engle said in an interview with The New York Times in 2001. “Nonsense about witchcraft and fantasy. First I felt horror, then anger, and finally I said, ‘Ah, the hell with it.’ It’s great publicity, really.”

    The book begins, “It was a dark and stormy night,” repeating the line of a 19th-century novelist, Edward George Bulwer-Lytton. “Wrinkle” then takes off. Meg Murry, with help from her psychic baby brother, uses time travel and extrasensory perception to rescue her father, a gifted scientist, from a planet controlled by the Dark Thing. She does so through the power of love.

    The book uses concepts that Ms. L’Engle said she had plucked from Einstein’s theory of relativity and Planck’s quantum theory, almost flaunting her frequent assertion that children’s literature is literature too difficult for adults to understand.

    (...)

    Ms. L’Engle’s writing career was going so badly in her 30s that she claimed she almost quit writing at 40. But then “Meet the Austins” was published in 1960, and she was already deeply into “Wrinkle.” The inspiration came to her during a 10-week family camping trip.

    That was just the start. She once described herself as a French peasant cook who drops a carrot in one pot, a piece of potato in another and an onion and a piece of meat in another.

    “At dinnertime, you look and see which pot smells best and pull it forward,” she was quoted as saying in a 2001 book, “Madeleine L’Engle (Herself): Reflections on a Writing Life,” compiled by Carole F. Chase.

    “The same is true with writing,” she continued. “There are several pots on my backburners.”

    Her deeper thoughts on writing were deliciously mysterious. She believed that experience and knowledge were subservient to the subconscious and perhaps larger, spiritual influences.


    The full obituary is at Madeleine L’Engle - Obituary - The New York Times
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    I bought the book and still have to read it haha. Im pretty sure I have read it growing up but I cant remember it too well, so either way I wanna read it before seeing the movie. I hope you enjoy the movie too ^^
    Watashi wa chōdo nani ga jūyō ka


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    Quote Originally Posted by DulcetRefrain View Post
    I bought the book and still have to read it haha. Im pretty sure I have read it growing up but I cant remember it too well, so either way I wanna read it before seeing the movie. I hope you enjoy the movie too ^^
    Thank you!

    I read the book as a kid, but then as an adult, I found out that there were audiobooks of several of Madeleine L'Engle's books, read by the author. I borrowed the audiobook from the library and listened to her read this book. Her voice sounded the way she describes Mrs. Whatsit's voice in the book: "like an unoiled gate, but somehow not unpleasant"!

    At first, I worried that I wouldn't get used to her voice. She sounded startling and odd. But within a few minutes, I was used to it. Now I think she's the best reader for her books. She's animated, and she knows how to bring them to life.
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    Saw it.

    Overall, decent. Pretty good in some regards. A few weird choices.

    Predictably, it didn't live up to my enthusiasm for the book itself. I think they did a good job, though, except a few things:

    1. Oprah didn't play the character of Mrs. Which. She played a deified version of her own self instead. She also gave a lot of gratuitous, touchy-feely speeches that are not in the book. Mrs. Which was nothing like that. WTF
    2. The Happy Medium was portrayed as an eccentric yoga instructor. This doesn't work. Also, I like her as a woman, which she is, in the book. Conceivably, a man could play this role in a way that would work, but this isn't the case here. In the 2003 version, if I recall correctly, something similar happened. The character came across as farcical, instead of as the lovable character in the book.
    3. My favorite location in the book is omitted from this movie. (I don't remember if it was included in the 2003 version.) Instead, there's a weird scene in which they're running away from a collapsing wall of soil. Was this in the book? I don't remember it. If it was, it could have been cut, and if it wasn't in the book, why was such a boring scene added to the movie? They're just running away from a mound of dirt, and shouting to each other about it.


    They also changed Camazotz a lot, but this version of it seemed to work on its own logic, so that change was supportable. I never really liked the parts of the book that occur in Camazotz, anyway.

    Great Casting Choice: Deric McCabe as Charles Wallace. "He was chosen out of thousands of child actors after seven months of searching." Deric McCabe - Wikipedia They picked the right kid to play that character.

    Costumes were interesting. A lot of emphasis on glittery makeup. Mrs. Which was supposed to be dressed up as a witch, for her own amusement, and for the Murry children's amusement. They didn't do that. Also, Mrs. Whatsit didn't do the squeaky boots part of her first scene. That's my favorite scene in the book. In the 2003 version, that scene was severely curtailed, and in the 2018 version, it wasn't curtailed in duration, but interesting elements were left out. Plus she's supposed to be dressed in overcoats and scarves, not a ballgown.

    Mostly, it was pretty good.
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    Yeah Im pretty sure I read this... but just cant remember it well.

    Means Ill probably need to read it again!
    Do one thing every day that scares you- Eleanor Roosevelt

    Johari

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty View Post
    Yeah Im pretty sure I read this... but just cant remember it well.

    Means Ill probably need to read it again!
    I recommend seeing if a library near you has the audiobook, read by the author, and hearing her read it. It's fun!
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    All I know about the book is what I saw on thug notes.
    (Great channel BTW YouTube, lemme guess the link just says "Youtube?" WTF is it with me, this site, and images/video?)

    Though I like what I saw; a bunch of women having to save the world -and male lead for once. Yeah, I'm all for that!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yuu View Post
    All I know about the book is what I saw on thug notes.

    Though I like what I saw; a bunch of women having to save the world -and male lead for once. Yeah, I'm all for that!
    That's a good point; I never thought of that. I must have taken it for granted. That's probably part of the reason I could relate to the book when I was little, because of the young lady being the main hero of the story. Although Nancy Drew had that too, but when I read Nancy Drew books, she was way older than I was.
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