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  1. #1
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    Default 2nd career 40 years from now

    In 40 years, I will be 62 years old with a well-funded retirement and plenty of assets. I’ll probably not have any children, and would like some part-time creative type career so I’m only semi-retired. I’ve had lots of ideas about what I’ll do 40 years from now, but acting seems interesting, counseling private practice sounds alright, and being an adjunct professor teaching a couple freshman classes a week at a university sounds nice. What are good part-time jobs for 60-somethings that are low stress and will keep me busy without upsetting me? Money is completely irrelevant.

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    animal shelter?
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  3. #3
    幽霊||๏ sᴏʟɪᴛᴀʀʏ ʀᴇɪɢɴ Hexcoder's Avatar
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    I'll be old enough to hope I'm dead first. Nobody wants those age related health issues.
    #r3c0de

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    Quote Originally Posted by Avocado View Post
    In 40 years, I will be 62 years old with a well-funded retirement and plenty of assets. I’ll probably not have any children, and would like some part-time creative type career so I’m only semi-retired. I’ve had lots of ideas about what I’ll do 40 years from now, but acting seems interesting, counseling private practice sounds alright, and being an adjunct professor teaching a couple freshman classes a week at a university sounds nice. What are good part-time jobs for 60-somethings that are low stress and will keep me busy without upsetting me? Money is completely irrelevant.
    Sounds like a great future or be contemplating, I couldnt imagine having that amount of wealth at that point or ever considering a career move in which money would be completely irrelevant. That is good news for you. Good luck whatever you choose.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Sounds like a great future or be contemplating, I couldnt imagine having that amount of wealth at that point or ever considering a career move in which money would be completely irrelevant. That is good news for you. Good luck whatever you choose.
    I’ve been carefully preparing for the future several years now, and my cautious planning is paying off. I’ve made it into a position where I not only have a lot saved, but will have a 60k pension starting at age 62 plus whatever extra money I earn from my investments, which total 3,600 a year with a growth rate averaging around 7% per year, give or take a few percent since markets can be fickle and I’m projecting decades into the future. I also have a plan that, if it doesn’t make me practically immortal, will create a practically immortal copy of myself to continue my plans well into the future, because first and foremost, I plan for the long term and am quite patient.

    I suppose my only achilles heel is my food addiction, which may kill me prematurely.

    EDIT: The defined benefit plan I’m locked into will track inflation the next 40 years, so that 60k in todays money will be 165k in 2059 money, though after 2059, the benefit will no longer track inflation. All in all, I expect to bring home 165k a year from my pension till I die and 40k a year from my savings from ages 62 to 85.

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    “I also have a plan that, if it doesn’t make me practically immortal, will create a practically immortal copy of myself to continue my plans well into the future, because first and foremost, I plan for the long term and am quite patient.”

    Just curious about this sentence. What does it mean? Feel free to reply or not- your choice

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    Quote Originally Posted by Avocado View Post
    I’ve been carefully preparing for the future several years now, and my cautious planning is paying off. I’ve made it into a position where I not only have a lot saved, but will have a 60k pension starting at age 62 plus whatever extra money I earn from my investments, which total 3,600 a year with a growth rate averaging around 7% per year, give or take a few percent since markets can be fickle and I’m projecting decades into the future. I also have a plan that, if it doesn’t make me practically immortal, will create a practically immortal copy of myself to continue my plans well into the future, because first and foremost, I plan for the long term and am quite patient.

    I suppose my only achilles heel is my food addiction, which may kill me prematurely.

    EDIT: The defined benefit plan I’m locked into will track inflation the next 40 years, so that 60k in todays money will be 165k in 2059 money, though after 2059, the benefit will no longer track inflation. All in all, I expect to bring home 165k a year from my pension till I die and 40k a year from my savings from ages 62 to 85.
    Sounds like a good pension plan, its good to have something which could allow you to afford early retirement.

    I have a lot of plans in place but nothing on that scale or of that scope, I also dont own a house or other assets as yet which I would see as important. Did you factor expenses into your plan such as renewal of car ownership or maintenance expenses of a property? Those are big things even before you consider all the possible crisis which can occur in that time of a more personal nature, as they say the best laid plans of mice and men, often go awry.

    Forward planning, particularly over the longer term, is a great thing, its something I wish I'd possessed a proper insight into a long, long time ago, like when I was in my teens or twenties. Although I think it is something which this generation is more uniquely in possession of than others, what with new emphasis upon time and life logging and what not, there's greater awareness of trade offs in terms of time versus gains than ever, or so it seems to me.

    Lots of things which used to constitute obstacles or barriers of ones own making, such as different kinds of self-impeding prejudices, seem to have disappeared and fallen by the wayside, I'm not sure as yet whether that will be a net gain or set back for civilisation as it could simply be that the same thinking of the very rich is now shared by everyone, including the potentially very poor, and any kind of middle ground has just vanished.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty View Post
    “I also have a plan that, if it doesn’t make me practically immortal, will create a practically immortal copy of myself to continue my plans well into the future, because first and foremost, I plan for the long term and am quite patient.”

    Just curious about this sentence. What does it mean? Feel free to reply or not- your choice
    I'm guessing that this is some sort of singularity style thinking, if its not then its perhaps some sort of metaphor for a legacy, I'm not 100% though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Sounds like a good pension plan, its good to have something which could allow you to afford early retirement.

    I have a lot of plans in place but nothing on that scale or of that scope, I also dont own a house or other assets as yet which I would see as important. Did you factor expenses into your plan such as renewal of car ownership or maintenance expenses of a property? Those are big things even before you consider all the possible crisis which can occur in that time of a more personal nature, as they say the best laid plans of mice and men, often go awry.

    Forward planning, particularly over the longer term, is a great thing, its something I wish I'd possessed a proper insight into a long, long time ago, like when I was in my teens or twenties. Although I think it is something which this generation is more uniquely in possession of than others, what with new emphasis upon time and life logging and what not, there's greater awareness of trade offs in terms of time versus gains than ever, or so it seems to me.

    Lots of things which used to constitute obstacles or barriers of ones own making, such as different kinds of self-impeding prejudices, seem to have disappeared and fallen by the wayside, I'm not sure as yet whether that will be a net gain or set back for civilisation as it could simply be that the same thinking of the very rich is now shared by everyone, including the potentially very poor, and any kind of middle ground has just vanished.
    I bought a small 2 bedroom, 1 bath property and reliable make of car to minimize those costs, but no, those are not factored in to what I said. I’m also holding most of the rest of the payout I got from my stroke of fortune in a high interest CD so it survives inflation till I need it, which will be after I retire. Given how much bad luck I’ve had till recently, a lot of this feels unreal...assuming no massive tragedy sweeps me under the riptide, I have exactly what I need to live a middle-class dignified life—and that’s playing the game cautiously.

    Yes, the other thing is singularity type thinking, in a nutshell.

    On a related note, I spilled a little gas in the car I was planning on keeping the next 20 years. I almost cried. Its a Toyota, which I bought due to their reputation for reliability.

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    How about a part time bartender at a tropical resort.
    The strong manly ones in life are those who understand the meaning of the word patience. Patience means restraining one's inclinations. There are seven emotions: joy, anger, anxiety, adoration, grief, fear, and hate, and if a man does not give way to these he can be called patient. I am not as strong as I might be, but I have long known and practiced patience. And if my descendants wish to be as I am, they must study patience.

    Ieyasu Tokugawa
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