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  1. #51
    ϚᗩᑎᑕTᑌᗩᖇY Luminous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j.c.t. View Post
    Read the appropriate literature, make notes, get to writing any way you see fit. I've found it to be a very natural process most of the time.
    Yeah... I was going to comment... Is it horrible that my writing process throughout my college years and high school years is a blur? You sum it up well. (And since it's relevant to what I said there, yes, I got good grades.)

    It may be that I learned how to write well so early in my academic career that it ceased being a process I had to actually think about. I had to write a great many papers on humanities and social sciences, including a long research paper, about research I did myself, in college. The main thing that sticks out to me about my process was wanting to bathe in the resources or works I referenced. I didn't want to just read over them quickly, but read and reread, go deep into them. That's why there was no way I would have chosen to write about Moby Dick for a grad level lit class I had. I greatly enjoyed taking my spring break one year to write a paper on Maslow. I could dive into the material without having to come back out and wade into the pool of any other subject. Easier to focus that way.

    I only ever did a technical paper with someone else, which worked flawlessly, because it was someone who was entirely compatible with me. I had forgotten about it until just now, actually, it was so seamless. Otherwise, my group projects tended to turn into fun goofiness, which I'm sure none of you can imagine.
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  2. #52
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    For me the nonlinear part and much of the creativity comes at that outlining stage, which is why I place so much emphasis on it. That is where I organize my thoughts and work out all the points I am trying to make and how they connect with each other - where the loosely differentiated fodder from reading and research takes on a coherent and focused form. The rest of the writing itself is almost just mechanics, though here I find more creativity in word choice, turns of phrase, parallelism and symmetry in how details are laid out, etc.
    Interesting. I can't get enough "flesh on the bones" at that stage. The thoughts need to be more fully articulated. I do use outlines at times but normally abandon that. It's a way to start thinking about what I want to talk about.

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  3. #53
    Vulnera Sanentur Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    Interesting. I can't get enough "flesh on the bones" at that stage. The thoughts need to be more fully articulated. I do use outlines at times but normally abandon that. It's a way to start thinking about what I want to talk about.
    I was thinking more about this today, because I am writing a paper at work, and am at the outline stage after a couple months of reading background information and interviewing experts in my "spare" time. I focus on the outline, but every now and then get a good idea for something more specific to say, or how to phrase it. When I do, I just type it after that part of the outline. I move sections of the outline around until they fit together the way I want. I fill in more detail when I don't find it clear enough. When I am satisfied with the outline, I will go back and incorporate all of these bits and pieces into the final text. For shorter papers (few pages), I often have most of the text in my head before even starting. When I am done, it rarely needs revisions.
    Though the ground was burnt and everything turned into ashes, we will revive again. The sky is still blue, the crashing waves from long ago are unchanged. This is Earth, our planet. This dream is in the hearts of people; so long as they do not abandon it, it will not fade away. For the sake of tomorrow, keep a song in your heart. For the sake of our future, let us stop our crying and stand on our ground firmly.
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  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
    Is it horrible that my writing process throughout my college years and high school years is a blur?
    I'm not entirely sure what that means, so I couldn't say.

    Quote Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
    It may be that I learned how to write well so early in my academic career that it ceased being a process I had to actually think about. I had to write a great many papers on humanities and social sciences, including a long research paper, about research I did myself, in college. The main thing that sticks out to me about my process was wanting to bathe in the resources or works I referenced. I didn't want to just read over them quickly, but read and reread, go deep into them. That's why there was no way I would have chosen to write about Moby Dick for a grad level lit class I had. I greatly enjoyed taking my spring break one year to write a paper on Maslow. I could dive into the material without having to come back out and wade into the pool of any other subject. Easier to focus that way.
    That's nice. I find it easy because it's something I love doing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
    I only ever did a technical paper with someone else, which worked flawlessly, because it was someone who was entirely compatible with me. I had forgotten about it until just now, actually, it was so seamless.
    I can't write papers with other people. In my experience we rarely have the same idea, and the ideas they do have frustrate me. I much prefer working alone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Luminous View Post
    Otherwise, my group projects tended to turn into fun goofiness, which I'm sure none of you can imagine.
    I can actually imagine that...

  5. #55
    Member oxyjen's Avatar
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    People actually do the "research-->notes--->outline-->rough draft---> final draft" routine? ah, ok. I always deemed this as antiquated information for the days of submitting papers written by hand, or by typewriter.

    It's been a long time since I've had to write papers for classes. I would read/research, maybe take some notes. I'd get an idea of the paper taking shape in my head. From that mental map I'd write the paper from beginning to end. On the computer it is so easy to add paragraph, move a paragraph, etc. That single draft is a ball of clay I work on until I like it.*

    *I'd only start on the clay about 24-72 hours before the thing was due. My lowest grade in any course or individual paper was a B, so it never bit me in the ass. Apart from screwing myself over for sleep, hating myself, vowing to do it differently next time, and then doing it absolutely the same way. Every. Single. Time.
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  6. #56
    Curious... The Cat's Avatar
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    I don't outline. I start at the beginning and when I come to the end. Stop.
    Conservatism is the blind and fear-filled worship of dead radicals.


    Oh, we're always all right. You remember that. We happen to other people.

    And I see fire, hollowing souls
    And I see fire, blood in the breeze
    And I hope that you'll remember me...

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  7. #57
    Vulnera Sanentur Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by /DG/ View Post
    Well, I've written fairly lengthy essays for in-class exams a couple of times before. But quite frankly I don't remember what happened. Lots of frantic erasing, I'm sure.
    This is one case in which an outline is especially helpful. I would make mine on scrap paper, or on the last page of the exam book, and spend a fair amount of time on it. Then, I would have a good idea what I needed to say from beginning to end, and could write the actual paragraphs fairly quickly with minimal erasing and no real need to revise.
    Though the ground was burnt and everything turned into ashes, we will revive again. The sky is still blue, the crashing waves from long ago are unchanged. This is Earth, our planet. This dream is in the hearts of people; so long as they do not abandon it, it will not fade away. For the sake of tomorrow, keep a song in your heart. For the sake of our future, let us stop our crying and stand on our ground firmly.
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  8. #58
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    I was thinking more about this today, because I am writing a paper at work, and am at the outline stage after a couple months of reading background information and interviewing experts in my "spare" time. I focus on the outline, but every now and then get a good idea for something more specific to say, or how to phrase it. When I do, I just type it after that part of the outline. I move sections of the outline around until they fit together the way I want. I fill in more detail when I don't find it clear enough. When I am satisfied with the outline, I will go back and incorporate all of these bits and pieces into the final text. For shorter papers (few pages), I often have most of the text in my head before even starting. When I am done, it rarely needs revisions.
    I can't say I've always done things this way but over the last 10 years at least, that's what I've evolved to We're both INTJs, but I think in general, you're just a much more structured individual than I am - in terms of thinking and how we operate. None of it's wrong - just different. I have wondered if it has something to do with your scientific/research background. I'm a business guy where getting things done fast and under time pressure is a constant thing. I'm sure my job has shaped how I operate. As an example, I will come up with an idea and then just implement it. You give things much more thoughtful consideration. In that way, I look a bit SPish.

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  9. #59
    Curious... The Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by /DG/ View Post
    @highlander whoever finds someone more structured than @Coriolis I will give them a prize
    the person who finds the more structured person or the more structured person? Also what prize?
    Conservatism is the blind and fear-filled worship of dead radicals.


    Oh, we're always all right. You remember that. We happen to other people.

    And I see fire, hollowing souls
    And I see fire, blood in the breeze
    And I hope that you'll remember me...


  10. #60
    Vulnera Sanentur Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by /DG/ View Post
    @highlander whoever finds someone more structured than @Coriolis I will give them a prize
    If you spent a couple of days with me, you would see that I am not nearly as structured as all that. I do find it helpful to apply some loose structures to certain kinds of tasks, though. I tend to get better results that way.
    Though the ground was burnt and everything turned into ashes, we will revive again. The sky is still blue, the crashing waves from long ago are unchanged. This is Earth, our planet. This dream is in the hearts of people; so long as they do not abandon it, it will not fade away. For the sake of tomorrow, keep a song in your heart. For the sake of our future, let us stop our crying and stand on our ground firmly.

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