User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 41

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    320

    Default Is a History PhD worth it?

    I used to be very passionate about history, and even now a little especially as it relates to politics and ethnic and political and regional relations, and I was wondering if a history PhD would be worth it because I would LOVE to get a History PhD and apply my knowledge of history, and the subject I was best at in school was history (Pre-college, i didnt take history this semester)
    Likes biohazard liked this post

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    320

    Default

    btw, i might be interested in multiple PhD areas at once, like political science, economics, etc. even hard sciences like physics, so don't grill me if i mention in another thread (or this one) something else.....I haven't made up my mind.

  3. #3
    Moderator Yuu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    8w7
    Socionics
    Duno None
    Posts
    4,667

    Default

    Only if you want to teach.

    I have a degree in Anthroplogy with a focus on history. It was a,ways just an interst, never expected to make a career of it.
    Likes SurrealisticSlumbers liked this post

  4. #4
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    MBTI
    NiFi
    Enneagram
    3w4 sx/so
    Socionics
    IEI4 Ni
    Posts
    9,270

  5. #5
    clever fool Typh0n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,543

    Default

    Doctorates are only good if you want to teach at university level.

    Otherwise they make you look too qualified from an employer's pov. The exception being in some fields where they are a requirement.
    Likes biohazard liked this post

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    27,610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typh0n View Post
    Doctorates are only good if you want to teach at university level.

    Otherwise they make you look too qualified from an employer's pov. The exception being in some fields where they are a requirement.
    Although if they are considering multiple PhD maybe they dont have to work, they could be independently wealthy.

    Anyway, I think in some ways your point is well made, even if its a country other than my own, which I have discovered really does not rate academic performance and in which is very, very easy to fall into this "over qualified" bullshit trap, there's a hell of a lot of people in medium to large firms who "worked up from the bottom" or took non-academic routes to their positions and are straight up bitter about others learning.

    Which I think is stupid, given that for the most part it just means people have been well read at one time in one particular area or discipline, I know there's skills involved too but I think it boils down to that. I wish there were more smart people but I also wish there was such hang ups about smartness too.

    I'd say to Warrior that as important as his core topic is, and he would want to study something that's interesting because I did a masters and I almost hated my choosen topic/area of research by the end of it and it was just a literature review thesis, not what I imagine a research project in a PhD could involve, to consider the extra curriculars and other aspects, as simple as accomodation for instance.

    Sometimes I think that a decent array of extra curriculars which can evidence your relationships with others a bit more can counter the whole "over qualified" thing or sometimes it doesnt mean shit and they have internal candidates and what not, study something because you want to do that for a few years.

  7. #7
    clever fool Typh0n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Survive & Stay Free View Post
    Although if they are considering multiple PhD maybe they dont have to work, they could be independently wealthy.

    Anyway, I think in some ways your point is well made, even if its a country other than my own, which I have discovered really does not rate academic performance and in which is very, very easy to fall into this "over qualified" bullshit trap, there's a hell of a lot of people in medium to large firms who "worked up from the bottom" or took non-academic routes to their positions and are straight up bitter about others learning.

    Which I think is stupid, given that for the most part it just means people have been well read at one time in one particular area or discipline, I know there's skills involved too but I think it boils down to that. I wish there were more smart people but I also wish there was such hang ups about smartness too.

    I'd say to Warrior that as important as his core topic is, and he would want to study something that's interesting because I did a masters and I almost hated my choosen topic/area of research by the end of it and it was just a literature review thesis, not what I imagine a research project in a PhD could involve, to consider the extra curriculars and other aspects, as simple as accomodation for instance.

    Sometimes I think that a decent array of extra curriculars which can evidence your relationships with others a bit more can counter the whole "over qualified" thing or sometimes it doesnt mean shit and they have internal candidates and what not, study something because you want to do that for a few years.
    I agree it is too bad that being smart labels you as being "overqualified" and that people see that as a threat. Conversly, I do think that it's good that you don't need to go through 8 years of college to be able to work your way up in the business or professional world, frankly that would be a loss of time.

    I think having a masters is fine though, most job ads I run into look for a bachelors and/or masters, having a masters as your highest degree is probably the sweet spot when it comes to finding a job, PhD tends to intimidate people though, I'm not saying it's impossible to find a job with a PhD, you're probably going to have better chances with a PhD than with nothing, it also depends on the field you work in, in science for example a PhD is good I would imagine even in the private sector, though we'd have to ask Coriolis. Summons @Coriolis

    I also think academia and the business world value very different things, academia values book smarts where business values street smarts applied to markets and finance, it's naturally a very different mentality as the nature of the work and its finality is very different. I'm not placing one above the other really, I think in life its good to have both book smarts and street smarts, they're not mutually exclusive.
    Likes biohazard, SurrealisticSlumbers liked this post

  8. #8
    breaking out of my cocoon SearchingforPeace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Enneagram
    9w8 sx/so
    Socionics
    EIE None
    Posts
    6,999

    Default

    There is an oversupply of PhDs, at least in America. Most recent liberal arts PhDs can not find full time positions in acedmia. It really isn't a good career choice, right now, at least in America.
    “Orthodoxy means not thinking--not needing to think. Orthodoxy is unconsciousness.”
    ― George Orwell, 1984

    “It is clear that thought is not free if the profession of certain opinions makes it impossible to earn a living. It is clear also that thought is not free if all the arguments on one side of a controversy are perpetually presented as attractively as possible, while the arguments on the other side can only be discovered by diligent search.”

    ― Bertrand Russell, Sceptical Essays
    Likes SurrealisticSlumbers liked this post

  9. #9
    The Memes Justify the End EcK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    738
    Socionics
    ILE None
    Posts
    7,614

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior View Post
    I used to be very passionate about history, and even now a little especially as it relates to politics and ethnic and political and regional relations, and I was wondering if a history PhD would be worth it because I would LOVE to get a History PhD and apply my knowledge of history, and the subject I was best at in school was history (Pre-college, i didnt take history this semester)
    So you are asking if a phd in a hobby is worth it. As in pay to learn stuff u can learn on your own on the side as a .. hobby? Why? The point of college is to become competent in someyhing that’s marketable, not “finding yourself”.

    If you are already interested in a topic there s no reason to assume u dont already have enough motivation to learn on your own.

    Also socia sciences are full of socialists - so how unbiased do u think 20th century history is going to be?
    Expression of the post modern paradox : "For the love of god, religions are so full of shit"

    Theory is always superseded by Fact...
    ... In theory.

    “I’d hate to die twice. It’s so boring.”
    Richard Feynman's last recorded words

    "Great is the human who has not lost his childlike heart."
    Mencius (Meng-Tse), 4th century BCE

  10. #10
    The Memes Justify the End EcK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    738
    Socionics
    ILE None
    Posts
    7,614

    Default

    “Quick the servers are crashing, only a historian can save us now”
    Replace “servers are crashing” with any business situation that requires a specific skillset and tell me if anyone is likelytk value a history phd.

    I hired tens of ppl and honestly if i see history or philosophy phd on someone s resume i m likely to assume the guy s an idiot for studying thay and skip the resume. Except maybe if he / she lists the phd under “hobby” at which point i would still be puzzled by the phd but at least respect that they dont seriously think i was going to consider that qualification as valuable to anyone except academia : ie: ppl who never had a real job
    Expression of the post modern paradox : "For the love of god, religions are so full of shit"

    Theory is always superseded by Fact...
    ... In theory.

    “I’d hate to die twice. It’s so boring.”
    Richard Feynman's last recorded words

    "Great is the human who has not lost his childlike heart."
    Mencius (Meng-Tse), 4th century BCE

Similar Threads

  1. Do you see the problem with typing others? Is it worth it?
    By Chancelade in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 01-23-2014, 07:37 PM
  2. What is worth it?
    By Qlip in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-05-2013, 12:36 PM
  3. [INFJ] Is the Truth Worth It?
    By fill in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-05-2009, 11:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO