User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 37

  1. #1
    Out riding fences Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    21,143

    Default Getting a job attuned to your strengths

    @highlander posted the video below on another thread, related to questions about career advice. I watched it with interest, as I feel I have fallen into the rut the speaker describes at the beginning, of being stuck in a job that doesn't make best use of my strengths, while forcing me to play from my weaknesses too much.

    I started this thread to get more discussion about the specific advice he has, as well as any other advice folks might have run across about what to do when stuck in a career rut with no apparent way out. I am looking especially for concrete suggestions. For instance, this speaker suggests making notes during week of what things you look forward to doing, and what makes you feel energised. This helps identify your strengths. He then mentions changing your job to make greater use of those, focus less on your weaknesses. This is much easier said than done, though, and often impossible with the same employer, meaning a full-up job search.

    Thoughts? This is obviously of personal interest to me, but I am putting this here as I hope for the discussion to be more general, and not focused on me or any specific person, though personal accounts are more than welcome.

    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  2. #2
    The Bat Man highlander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sx/sp
    Socionics
    ILI Ni
    Posts
    19,286

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    @highlander posted the video below on another thread, related to questions about career advice. I watched it with interest, as I feel I have fallen into the rut the speaker describes at the beginning, of being stuck in a job that doesn't make best use of my strengths, while forcing me to play from my weaknesses too much.

    I started this thread to get more discussion about the specific advice he has, as well as any other advice folks might have run across about what to do when stuck in a career rut with no apparent way out. I am looking especially for concrete suggestions. For instance, this speaker suggests making notes during week of what things you look forward to doing, and what makes you feel energised. This helps identify your strengths. He then mentions changing your job to make greater use of those, focus less on your weaknesses. This is much easier said than done, though, and often impossible with the same employer, meaning a full-up job search.

    Thoughts? This is obviously of personal interest to me, but I am putting this here as I hope for the discussion to be more general, and not focused on me or any specific person, though personal accounts are more than welcome.

    I went through a period of time where I was just wasn't enjoying what I was doing as much. I like starting things up from nothing and building things - sort of like a startup entrepreneur within a larger company. In my case, I've spent a good amount of time building up consulting practices in different areas. Once it would get to a certain size there was a repeating pattern. I'd been in a practice leadership role for about 15 years and too much of my time was centered around administrative stuff which grew to consume an increasing amount of time as the practices grew larger. Over time this led led towards me losing some of the depth and breadth of technical expertise that made me a nationally known and respected expert that others would come to. I thought about it long and hard - what I liked doing and what I didn't like doing. I had read a couple of Buckingham's books on this stuff and tracked what I really enjoyed and didn't (as he suggested).

    At the end of it, I left the practice leadership role and focused on client service which felt like a big risk at the time. I used my ability to "spin things up" in terms of building a footprint at clients instead of building a practice. Over the past few years, I have come to miss being in the practice leadership role because I like that too but the nice thing is I have more flexibility in what I do on a day to day basis. I have relatively few administrative responsibilities. The work is rarely routine and there are always new challenges. I again feel like I know my stuff and am very good at knowing what I don't know and able to tap into others that have expertise. I spend 90+% of my time focused on client service related activity. It's what my firm is in business for, so it works out. I had the best year I've ever had last year. The HR and administrative stuff is a bit of a boat anchor. I didn't realize how much till I got out of that role I'd been doing so long.

    Please provide feedback on my Nohari and Johari Window by clicking here: Nohari/Johari

    Tri-type 639

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24,871

    Default

    I'm thinking about some sort of adjustment like this, as things have not turned out well (I feel) in my current choice of career (although its not being stuck in a rut so much as taking stock of damage its done my health and reality that its not going to change, I've witnessed a couple of "false dawns" in that respect) but my profession has a number of different fields, which are pretty different from one another, so I'm lucky in that respect.

    Although there's new work philosophies emerging, so far as I can tell, like lots of newly qualified staff would put more thought into accreditation for decisions, daily developments and CV building, including pursuing job interviews every could of months (one junior or newly qualified member of staff talked to me about every three months going to interview).

    The one thing that I would say about supposedly finding yourself in a rut is that its alright to be simply earning a living, provided you are conscientious enough as an employee, some of what I hear in the life logging, corporate hack scene sounds pretty cultish, they are all drinking the kool aid and dont like people pointing it out to them, I know a lot of people who've got seriously rich family lives or lots of variegated and interesting hobbies and circles of friends outside of totally apart from work, I wouldnt knock that for an instant but they are the sorts of people who can be labelled in an ugly fashion by colleagues or management.

    Parks and Rec did some interesting season story arcs on that theme, its funny how the comedians frequently see things as clearly as they do and lots of management texts or just business cultures are slow to catch on to or denying the reality of things.

  4. #4
    Out riding fences Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    21,143

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I'm thinking about some sort of adjustment like this, as things have not turned out well (I feel) in my current choice of career (although its not being stuck in a rut so much as taking stock of damage its done my health and reality that its not going to change, I've witnessed a couple of "false dawns" in that respect) but my profession has a number of different fields, which are pretty different from one another, so I'm lucky in that respect.
    How much of a change do you think you will need to make to improve your situation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    The one thing that I would say about supposedly finding yourself in a rut is that its alright to be simply earning a living, provided you are conscientious enough as an employee, some of what I hear in the life logging, corporate hack scene sounds pretty cultish, they are all drinking the kool aid and dont like people pointing it out to them, I know a lot of people who've got seriously rich family lives or lots of variegated and interesting hobbies and circles of friends outside of totally apart from work, I wouldnt knock that for an instant but they are the sorts of people who can be labelled in an ugly fashion by colleagues or management.
    That's part of it. I am finding it harder and harder to be conscientious in my present job, it has become so draining. When I am using my strengths and in an environment more suited to my preferences, it almost seems that I get energy from doing a good job.

    I am curious about what other resources folks might have used when making a career change, whether large or small: books, videos, surveys, etc. I recently worked through "What color is your parachute", and have lots of pages of completed exercises, but nothing gels into a workable plan or direction. Perhaps I need to revisit them when I am less hurried and can focus better.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  5. #5
    The Bat Man highlander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sx/sp
    Socionics
    ILI Ni
    Posts
    19,286

    Default

    I read what color is your parachute when I graduated from college Maybe it helped a little. Some of the ideas stuck with me

  6. #6
    Out riding fences Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    21,143

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    I read what color is your parachute when I graduated from college Maybe it helped a little. Some of the ideas stuck with me
    I like how it works to broaden the horizons of the average job-seeker, in terms of what counts as marketable skills, and how to balance the many factors one might like or dislike in a job or work environment. I just couldn't make use of the results very well.

    Your video isn't the first place I heard the advice to sort of "massage" your existing job to be more to your liking, but either the nature of my workplace prevents that to large degree, or I am not going about it in the right way.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24,871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    How much of a change do you think you will need to make to improve your situation?


    That's part of it. I am finding it harder and harder to be conscientious in my present job, it has become so draining. When I am using my strengths and in an environment more suited to my preferences, it almost seems that I get energy from doing a good job.

    I am curious about what other resources folks might have used when making a career change, whether large or small: books, videos, surveys, etc. I recently worked through "What color is your parachute", and have lots of pages of completed exercises, but nothing gels into a workable plan or direction. Perhaps I need to revisit them when I am less hurried and can focus better.
    I dont think that big a change to be honest, I'm not talking the monk who left his ferrari or the milkman who retrained as a Doctor here.

    Definitely know what you mean re:books and exercises and stuff, I detest some of the more obvious (nasty even) publications which straight up imply to the reader that the reason they are trying to change their job is that they are unprepared to change themselves and if they did that instead they'd be fine, its possible to adopt the most radical coping skills imaginable but if your colleagues, management or circumstances are having tangible negative consequences on you directly it'll count for little (sometimes little itself counts for a lot but all the same).

    I read another book years and years ago I think it was called "nickle and dimed" which made a point about something called "bait and switch" and I saw it in an episode of Malcolm in the Middle too when the father took the eldest kid to a "job fair" only to discover that there were not any actual jobs at the fair just lots and lots of services being offered, for a fee, to the unemployed to increase their prospects (in theory anyway) through selling interview rehearsals and CV builders or what not.

    Its like anything else, ie losing weight, making friends and influencing people, dating, there's lots of advice for sale but it doesnt actually mean any of the promises will be or even necessarily can be delivered upon, often all that is involved is the reading experience, or, more often than not, the consumer experience of ponying up cash and then experiencing the buyers regret. I tend to think its got to do with the commercialisation or commercial exploit of hope/desperation, gloomy and sad maybe but hey, its just another day in the having mode of existence.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24,871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    I like how it works to broaden the horizons of the average job-seeker, in terms of what counts as marketable skills, and how to balance the many factors one might like or dislike in a job or work environment. I just couldn't make use of the results very well.

    Your video isn't the first place I heard the advice to sort of "massage" your existing job to be more to your liking, but either the nature of my workplace prevents that to large degree, or I am not going about it in the right way.
    Alternatively, you could read something like The Barefoot Investor and get a different perspective altogether, maybe its a bit much to expect work to satisfy in any way other than income/revenue, which you can then save, when you have enough savings from earnings and economising expenses you can investigate income from shares and eventually be financially independent, able to forget about that job if that's what you want to do.

    I've put more than ten years, and some serious life course altering decisions, into a job largely for reasons other than the remuneration, I would not ever have done this if I knew then what I know now. I've got two life limiting illnesses and the whole experience has been detrimental to my psychological health too. If I had been more knowledgeable and worked much smarter, I could have avoided this altogether.

    Plus, its not really about hating your job if you desire financial independence, its about freedom and other things which its fine to love as much as you might love your job and which you want to dedicate time to also instead.

  9. #9
    Out riding fences Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    21,143

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Survive & Stay Free View Post
    I've put more than ten years, and some serious life course altering decisions, into a job largely for reasons other than the remuneration, I would not ever have done this if I knew then what I know now. I've got two life limiting illnesses and the whole experience has been detrimental to my psychological health too. If I had been more knowledgeable and worked much smarter, I could have avoided this altogether.
    I based my career choices on factors other than remuneration also, though I always knew I would be able to have a reasonable salary, if not become wealthy (which is fine). There are too many things I enjoy doing and can do for me ever to be stuck in some job just for the money. I'm just having trouble matching that up with available opportunities - or figuring out how to make my own opportunity. I can afford significant risk at this point in my life financially.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24,871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    I based my career choices on factors other than remuneration also, though I always knew I would be able to have a reasonable salary, if not become wealthy (which is fine). There are too many things I enjoy doing and can do for me ever to be stuck in some job just for the money. I'm just having trouble matching that up with available opportunities - or figuring out how to make my own opportunity. I can afford significant risk at this point in my life financially.
    At the moment I'm working hard to try and build up sufficient savings to be financially independent, I'm not even talking about early retirement as that's not exactly what I want to do, I would like to earn enough money that I could make choices about my working life, like split a year between two locations, even two jobs even, even two different fields even and I'd like to rotate my jobs, so that I could learn new skills and get paid while doing it and choose work on the basis of things like the manager is a good manager, a proper team leader and not someone who will prove as lousy a manager as others have been lousy managers to them (a bit of a problem in Northern Ireland I gather) or the colleagues are good colleagues etc.

    Although all of that is not immediate, in the more immediate term of the next five to ten years I simply want to find work that is not killing me but eventually that's my working life dream, that's besides striking the right work life balance too and having enough leisure time to indulge interests which are unlikely to be remunerative but which are just fun.

    The thing about this all is that you only have one life, which is made up of time, which is passing everyday and every moment, I wish I had been mature enough to think this all out when I was a lot, lot younger, careers advice sucked back then, pretty much, it still isnt that great today and everyone thinks primarily in terms of how do you get as high paying a low income (if that makes sense), in as steady and secure a post as possible (when flexibility may be more appealing or important).

    The only way that you can make work work for you is mainly if you have money already and arent depending on work to provide it, which is kind of a catch 22 but you know.

Similar Threads

  1. [NT] NTs-Would you alter your personality test to get a job?
    By sculpting in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 09-02-2013, 09:54 PM
  2. [NF] NFs-Would you alter your personality test to get a job?
    By sculpting in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 08-15-2013, 06:56 PM
  3. [ENTJ] ENTJ, how do you get back on track when you've lost yourself to your worse functions?
    By UnitOfPopulation in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 04-15-2009, 08:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO