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  1. #31
    Senior Member Lucy_Ricardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    All reasonable, but where I lose it is at (1) already. How does one do this? This is standard advice for people looking for career change, but no one explains how actually to figure this out.
    Okay, let me see if I can be more specific through anecdote. When I realized I didn't like my job and that it wasn't going to get any better, I made a list of things that I liked and disliked about my current job, as well as my strengths and weaknesses in that position. Like, a literal list, with pen and paper.

    So as an attorney, I realized that I was good at writing, proofreading, communicating with clients and other attorneys, office management, and meeting deadlines. I also enjoyed these aspects of my job.

    I did NOT like working under intense pressure, bookkeeping, working with seedy clientele, working long hours, and appearing in court. ESPECIALLY appearing in court--I was terrible at it. My nerves got the better of me every time.

    I also knew that even though I didn't like being an attorney, I valued my legal education and knew it would be an asset to me in my job search.

    So once I figured out where my strengths and likes were, I used those as keywords in my job searches online. So on Indeed.com, for example, I would search for jobs whose descriptions including "writing," "editing," "proofreading," "law degree," "customer service"--keywords that I thought would yield results tailored to my strengths.

    Those searches yielded countless results, and I sifted through hundreds of them. And the results were varied across all industries. So when I say think outside the box, I mean don't just look at postings that are within the industry you thought you wanted--sometimes the job you want is in a field you haven't considered.

    For example, my new job deals with government contracts, but it's a technology company. I never imagined myself working for a technology company, and I never thought I could because I have no IT training. But I applied for the job anyway because the job description fit what I was looking for. And in my interview, I learned that the position I sought didn't require any IT training. Had I not thought outside my preconceived boundaries, I would have never applied for my editor position because it was in an industry I was not familiar with.

    I hope that clears my meaning up a bit.
    "The world is indeed full of peril, and in it there are many dark places; but still there is much that is fair, and though in all lands love is now mingled with grief, it grows perhaps the greater." --J.R.R. Tolkien
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  2. #32
    Senior Member Wunjo's Avatar
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    I think, having the necessary skills to pull out a job is not the only prequisite of being highly successful at it. For example, I am a translator currently and started to go places after a relatively long phase of practical dissatisfaction but in the end, I desire to be a psychologist, a vision that I will hopefully achieve in the next couple of years. I have the focus, determination, detail-orientedness and the command over language, which are the prequisites of being a good translator, I also have a lot of desire to achieve to be successful, but deep down, I see my current profession only as a means to an end, so I can easily say that despite being quite a capable translator, I am not at my full strength. Since I am seeing it as a means to an end, I usually divert my attention to other things while working, which is not a result of an altered focus but a mild disinterest, from what I see. Don't let me be misunderstood, I like doing it a lot, one of the reasons of this is that I think I am a capable translator, but I am hardly, extremely passionate about it, and I think need that invigorating passion to be excellent at and hyperalert about it.

    Hopefully I'll be able to overcome this when I start to study psychology, because I'll keep doing translation jobs then too, in order to support myself financially.

    That makes it boil down to the possibility that I'll be more satisfied with it, once I make my primary occupational vision a reality.

    Edit: Oh and, here's to my 666th post.
    "The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of the dusk."
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  3. #33

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    I was lucky and entered my industry as middle management in a job with help from my network. But middle management wasn't my thing since you're like the meat in a baloney sandwich, beholden to both slices of bread. Annoying. So what I did was to reshape the role, providing upper management with data, help (goto person) and insights, that they never received before. What this allowed was the opportunity to hire more help to remove the mundane tasks from me so I could provide upper management with services that played to my strengths. Part of the job included becoming a member of multiple industry committees which exposed me to brass from other firms. From there, I was stolen from firm to firm until I was hired as a COO and 1/3 partner of a small firm. Once the firm grew to a medium sized, I sold my piece and started consulting. At first, it was as a dedicated consultant to one firm but that bored me so I started consulting for multiple firms and created a client base. All this resulted in my opportunity to retire before 40.

    In other words, create your reality by playing to your strengths so you're noticed.
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  4. #34
    Liberator Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bechimo View Post
    I was lucky and entered my industry as middle management in a job with help from my network. But middle management wasn't my thing since you're like the meat in a baloney sandwich, beholden to both slices of bread. Annoying. So what I did was to reshape the role, providing upper management with data, help (goto person) and insights, that they never received before. What this allowed was the opportunity to hire more help to remove the mundane tasks from me so I could provide upper management with services that played to my strengths. Part of the job included becoming a member of multiple industry committees which exposed me to brass from other firms. From there, I was stolen from firm to firm until I was hired as a COO and 1/3 partner of a small firm. Once the firm grew to a medium sized, I sold my piece and started consulting. At first, it was as a dedicated consultant to one firm but that bored me so I started consulting for multiple firms and created a client base. All this resulted in my opportunity to retire before 40.

    In other words, create your reality by playing to your strengths so you're noticed.
    It sounds like your employing organizations had enough flexibility to accommodate your reshaping your role. I am attempting to do that right now, but my organization is extremely inflexible, which has always been a problem, and is becoming moreso as it is now allowing some bad actors to get away with things that undercut what I have been doing. I do not have the leeway to fend them off or even work around them while in my current position. In parallel, I am working on the possibility of moving on as well. We will see which comes to pass. The outside opportunity would bring a better blend of activities, at the cost of lower compensation. A fair tradeoff at this point in my career. I am one of those folks who will probably never completely retire, but it's been a long time since I could be motivated with money.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    It sounds like your employing organizations had enough flexibility to accommodate your reshaping your role. I am attempting to do that right now, but my organization is extremely inflexible, which has always been a problem, and is becoming moreso as it is now allowing some bad actors to get away with things that undercut what I have been doing. I do not have the leeway to fend them off or even work around them while in my current position. In parallel, I am working on the possibility of moving on as well. We will see which comes to pass. The outside opportunity would bring a better blend of activities, at the cost of lower compensation. A fair tradeoff at this point in my career. I am one of those folks who will probably never completely retire, but it's been a long time since I could be motivated with money.
    My old industry was finance and investments. They're not normally flexible. Another reason which I didn't mention, was that I made my division revenue generating, rather than its historical support role to revenue generating divisions. That got me the promotion to VP which created the room and budget to level up. You have to give the brass incentive to become flexible and as an INTJ, you can do it through innovation through cost effective means. Have some confidence in yourself.

    Once you have that first ticket under your belt, if you network with other industry professionals, you can build a solid reputation which will subsequently get you head hunted and that's when you can negotiate hard. After that first company, all other jobs were defined by me.

    That said, don't be afraid to transfer out of your department or make lateral moves if there are better future opportunities. You don't have to leave a firm if it also provides job security.

    But I do hear and understand what you're saying.

  6. #36
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    I need to do this... I have the biggest opportunity to shape my future role...and eventually my dream type of position but I lack pure motivation.... the idea of the grind is getting to me.
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  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Consilience View Post
    I need to do this... I have the biggest opportunity to shape my future role...and eventually my dream type of position but I lack pure motivation.... the idea of the grind is getting to me.
    The more you do upfront, the less work and hassle later. Analogous, the foundation defines the shape of the home you'll be living in for decades to come.
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  8. #38
    Magus daemonic Sung Jin-Woo's Avatar
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    I never got to go to college, and have bounced around several vastly different types of jobs with varying degrees of skills. But like others, I have no idea what I am good at, or what I would enjoy. So I tend to balance earnings and stress, and choose jobs that are worth putting up with shit.

    I have noticed that I am explicitly good at managing things, and being efficient. I can also create efficient systems for others to follow. I just don't know of a way I can get into a job like that without schooling. I could try for Resource management, but I am not sure if I will enjoy it.
    Masculine republics, give way to feminine democracies. Feminine democracies, give way to tyranny.
    - Aristotle

  9. #39
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    The problem that may not be identified is that we may not really know which are our natural strength, talent. Another problem that may be unidentified is that that who is able to identify the strength in us correctly.
    Those are another reasons why I have been learning typology, expecting I will be able to know myself better.
    The third problem is that we may not be familiar with other jobs that we have never experienced in so we just can't tell if we are assigned to another job role, would we be succeed in?
    So even if we knew what our strengths are, we couldn't just tell which role will be suitable for our strengths.
    A practical and concrete suggestion to the third problem is to let yourself discovered by head hunter. They will explain what are the jobs responsibilities to the candidates and if they judge that the candidates are suitable they will offer jobs.
    Last edited by typologyenthusiast; 08-24-2019 at 07:24 PM.

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