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  1. #1
    Member Morpheus's Avatar
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    Default Focusing on what you do best or what you wish you could do best?

    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus View Post
    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
    There are billions of people fighting for jobs. You need to make yourself stand out somehow or it's the lowest rung in the service industry forever.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member ceecee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus View Post
    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
    Most people that realize they hate what they do, don't come to that realization until they're actually doing it. While I agree that you should do whatever you can to stand above the rest, I don't agree that you can't do something you at least like better. Because if you're a standout in a job you hate, just imagine how great you could be at something you like.
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  4. #4
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Whatever is worth doing, is worth doing badly.

  5. #5
    Liberator Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mole View Post
    Whatever is worth doing, is worth doing badly.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Oberon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus View Post
    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
    This is a good question and one I find myself returning to every three months.

    Background: I am currently gainfully employed and many would envy my position, although it is quite modest in the grand scheme of things - I am doing alright for someone in their mid-thirties (not wealthy but well enough).

    I would say that specialization pays off from what I've seen but comes with great sacrifices to your health, social life, and mental well-being. That being said it is becoming increasingly hard to have a life of abundance without specializing so there will be issues to well-being even if you don't specialize.

    This is why I do not really fall into politics, or get too worked up about the system. The system is definitely the best in the world, but we are not really free people who benefit from society equal to our contributions. But that is a tangent and I wouldn't really debate that here because it might flag me and when things turn, I don't want to be put in the goulash.

    There are certain types of specializations. For example a general doctor is still a specialization even though it is not a "vertical specialization" within the medicine field, it is certainly more specialized than, let's say, a waiter.

    What I notice though is that when I see a specialize, for example I had a root canal today and went to a specialist instead of my dentist, they do way better work....much much better. I mean you are talking about night and day here between root canals at a dentist versus a specialist who only does root canals. I happen to know the specialists who work in the tooth field and they all have mansions....I on the other hand, specialized moderately, and I am living in a condo with positive net earnings...we work about the same hours (sometimes I work more since I work for a corporation which requires me to work according to my bosses paradigm regardless of any "laws."

    Not with regards to following your passion...unless you are going to make 1,000,000's following your passion really quickly, it might not be worth it. You see even if you are making 200k following your passion, if your passion is in a fickle field, that will go away quickly. For example SEO optimization. You could love doing that and be making 500k now but if search engines become obsolete you go to 0...and there will probably be something better than a search engine in the next ten years.

    Same with art. I knew a girl that was drawing paintings that could rival Leonardo Da'Vinci and she couldn't sell it for $10.00. I knew another guy who bragged about how he basically just took a dump on a canvas but was the "it" guy and was making 500k...probably not anymore but he did one year. So passion and talent will not get you wealthy in the field of your passion. You will need other skills - such as being a good sales man. If you can't stomach lying to people to sell your passion in high risk fields, where selling is required since people don't need your products, then you can go into accounting and start an accounting practice which is pretty much the only really honest business you could hope to grow - except the part where the taxation is not moral at all as it is conducted...so you will be the devils right hand, but at least you will be an honest hand.

    That being said....it's hard to figure out for sure...I wouldn't really take my advice here, I'm just showing you what I think about it....plus...if you really think about what your passion is, it will probably change. That is why I said you might want to ensure you are making 1,000,000 doing your passion over the course of a few years because if you're only making 100k your going to be miserable eventually, unless you are one of those people who is so singularly focused on stuff - like teaching, helping other - and you don't care too much about money.

    But if you're asking the questions then you are probably wondering what is more effective in wealth building. Following your passion is ultra-mega-high risk. What is your risk appetite? Could you live with yourself if you follow your passion but don't have a pot to piss in? Then follow it. I could never take on that risk because part of my self-esteem comes from my ability to produce and provide and the way I was raised was to believe that I am only as useful as what I earn. Sad...I know, but not as sad as the plutocracy which spawned that culture.
    "I dream in stereo, the stereo sounds strange, I know that if you hide, it doesn't go away, if you get out of bed.....my little dark age."
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus View Post
    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
    I havent found it more complicated than - do I like my job? Am I less happy, the same, or more happy than when Im not doing it?

    If youre in a job which is the former, you gotta move on quick as you can - its probably dragging you down and affecting your overall happiness outside of work too. If its the middle one, thats pretty good but you might be able to do better so think about other options. If its the latter: thats the ideal. Hang on to it.
    Last edited by tommyc; 03-13-2019 at 05:47 PM.

  8. #8
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    I work to survive. I don't know of any "dream job" or finding the best fit. I size up the best fit by the amount of independence I have. The less strings attached, the better. So running my own business is the only fit. I'd rather make 50K a year running my own business than 100k a year working for a fancy operation. I'd rather call the shots and be wrong. Thankfully, I've got a good brain, so I've been right enough of the time, even when just running on pure instinct with no prior knowledge to draw from. A lot of those people in the fancy operations are complete dolts...I've run rings around them more than a few times. I could make a lot more money if I was willing to prostitute myself....but then I would have to play a role and eat crap on a daily basis. I'd rather live in my car. Certain lines I don't cross because I've got too much self-respect.
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  9. #9
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    I need to pull my head out of other people's arses.

    Because I was (and often still am) way too naive and trusting of other's opinions when it comes to work.

    Turns out, on close examination heuristically, that most people just wing it a lot of the time and do well precisely because of what they aren't trying to do. Which isn't to say people don't have goals or general directions, but the most successful seem able to adapt these to context, circumstance & need where necessary, allowing them to bullshit themselves and others later (once they are more ahead) by telling the old story that there was a series of specific methods and events that lead to achievement. Except they miss out the gritty reality that ability to handle stress, adaptability, general working intelligence, good intuitive instincts (non-typologically) & thinking on your feet are actually key to managing the individual skills you have to put into place for most jobs.

    That's because those are more innate than the technical skills you actually want to acquire in order to market yourself. In fact they are the 'meta' skills of learning and becoming good at something. Without them you're trying to understand calculus by counting on your fingers and toes; it's nonsense. This isn't to say that you cannot improve these meta areas, but the techniques involved are an area of attention and effort in their own right and can take over the very plans you meant to apply them to.

    I agree with the sentiment that nothing worth having comes easy, cliche as it is, but only up to a point. And that point is where working hard meets working intelligently. And people often miss this because modern workplaces are extremely fast-paced, at least in the areas with most opportunity and population...i.e. cities. It's difficult to keep your cool and see epiphanic avenues or have good ideas when you succumb to the pressure. And that's only half under your control.

    So for me passion is a weak motivator, contingent on far too many chances and mitigating factors. You do, though, need to do something within your level of stress management and coping skills, otherwise you will be miserable and feel inadequate.

    I tried for years to excel in areas I like and admired, but it turned out I wasn't really suited to them and I've continued to struggle and attempt to find what I am more attuned to so I can focus on that, even if I don't actually like it all that much. At least then I could make some money to survive and take a degree of pride in knowing I was half-way decent at that skill & that it was something I could rely on to make myself useful and marketable. I pretty much wasted my youth and health up till now by trying to reach for a passion.

    If you do get that extremely unlikely situation where you are earning comfortably and enjoying your passion, then I commend you. But you would be the member of an extremely small percentage of the population.

    Ah well, keep striving, it's the least we can all do.

    PS: Also, try not to be too agreeable or people pleasing, if you can help it, you need to fight for your own worth and make sure you aren't someone else's whipping post. Otherwise you'll end up being that statistic which does most of the work for none of the recognition.
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  10. #10
    Liberator Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus View Post
    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
    There are several factors intertwined here. First, as @ceecee suggested, you can and should find a happy medium between what you like to do and what you do well. For many people, part of the liking is that they can do it well, and can be successful at it. I at least find it hard to enjoy doing something I am bad at. It is just frustrating, and I feel I am not accomplishing very much. Then there is the difference between interests or passions, and marketable skills. Whatever your interests, you can pick up skills along the way like computer skills or a foreign language/ASL. You can support yourself based on these skills while looking for a job you will like better, and they can also help you land a job in your preferred field, over a candidate who lacks them. I have gotten several jobs by taking a job I didn't really care for in my preferred organization, then working my way up/over by taking interest in the jobs I did want, showing initiative, and demonstrating I was a good worker. Organizations will often hire or promote from within, because they getting a known quantity, someone who has already proven themselves.

    Yes, if you enjoy a job or career, you are more likely to put the time and effort into honing your skills and getting better at it. You will also come to it with more enthusiasm and ambition. Beware the notion that you will find happiness in a "dream job", though. Happiness on the job is as much related to your boss, coworkers, and working environment as your actual duties. I am a good example of that. In some sense, I have my "dream job", but it has become quite unpleasant and almost untenable due to the aforementioned factors.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

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