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  1. #11
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    When passion means energy required, that makes workers enthusiastic in their work, following passion is actually a good advice in the long run, even tough it may not be well paid just yet. Generally speaking, A role in a job that you are assigned to may be not well suited for you. It could be harmful, so could be the best when we are not assigned to the role.

    A lot of executive jobs are so standardized to the extent to which creativity are not appreciated. May be What they appreciate is to follow the procedure. Doing that for a living will not be feasible for me professionally, and mentally. I see NO SPECIALIST in standardized executive work. Specializing can be more achievable when worker are following their passion rather than following procedure.

    I dream to find jobs that best fit with my nature of energy. Probably it is an entrepreneurial one.

  2. #12
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    Focus on making it on your own....see what you're made out of. People born into a safety net are better to disavow it and start from scratch. Back in the day when I used to work for others (7 days a week) clearin' a 1000 a week is all that mattered...the goal was to put the most money away in the shortest amount of time so I could pay bills and invest in my business...cared less about what I did....I just knew I deserved to get paid for the air I breathe, so I started to wanna get paid all the time and force my foot into the door of something better. After my first business came to a halt (entire budget tied up), I was even more hungry to build capital, so as to keep the wheels greased. I'd go from a five day a week shit job, to a two day a week high powered job (make more in those two days than I made the other five days) and then work on multiple businesses at night, with little time for sleep...just running on pure greed....I wanted money coming in from every direction. The talkers, union whiners, idiot managers, brushed it all off. Bills need to be paid or the water gets shut off.
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  3. #13
    Primal evil Sung Jin-Woo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus View Post
    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
    Securing a decent paying job, getting a lot of diverse work experience, and getting out of your comfort zone are absolutely essential as a first step. No one remains unchanging. Your passions and interests change over time. So it is always better to stick to a well paying job, so you can afford to chase different dreams when you realize you didn't have a true passion for something. Very few people get it right the first time.
    “An intellectual says a simple thing in a hard way. An artist says a hard thing in a simple way.”
    Charles Bukowski
    Likes Consilience liked this post

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by typologyenthusiast View Post
    When passion means energy required, that makes workers enthusiastic in their work, following passion is actually a good advice in the long run, even tough it may not be well paid just yet. Generally speaking, A role in a job that you are assigned to may be not well suited for you. It could be harmful, so could be the best when we are not assigned to the role.

    A lot of executive jobs are so standardized to the extent to which creativity are not appreciated. May be What they appreciate is to follow the procedure. Doing that for a living will not be feasible for me professionally, and mentally. I see NO SPECIALIST in standardized executive work. Specializing can be more achievable when worker are following their passion rather than following procedure.

    I dream to find jobs that best fit with my nature of energy. Probably it is an entrepreneurial on...
    Pay means a lot. Don't underestimate the power of high wages in making workers enthusiastic. I worked shit-jobs, and I worked high-powered jobs. For awhile I did both at the same time....the high-powered job began as part-time. It was night and day. In the high-powered job, I did not have to apply. I just got a call one day out of nowhere and was requested to come in for a meeting. In the high-powered job, pretty much everybody is motivated to get the job done. Call-outs are very rare. There was no such thing as a manager, because nobody needs to be monitored. When it was time to grind, people would be there until eight, nine at night. Nobody complained....people were treated like adults. It was almost like running my own business....almost. In the shit jobs, total opposite. People whine and complain all the time. Call-outs are incredibly common, and enthusiasm is low. A lot of people don't want to do anything because the pay sucks, and comprehension skills are low. Thus, everything has to be rigidly structured, and requires the creation of a "middle management" class....the "supervisor."

    At the end of the day, you get what you pay for. If you pay shit, you get shit. If you pay gold, you get gold.
    Click here for my 2500+ Enneagram Type List to type yourself and others with. It's the only valid breakdown for every enneagram type, wing and stack.

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    Click here for my typings of 100+ fictional exemplars and here for my typings of 90+ typology central members.

  5. #15
    Mr. Brightside... The Cat's Avatar
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    If the cash is there, I do not care. I do enjoy a pleasantly social work environment though.
    With all due respect,
    The Cat.

    Clarity demands a certain degree of objectivity, from the world as well as the observer...


    I’m the one who gripped you tight and raised you from perdition.
    I am Catstiel. I am an Angel of the Lord...

  6. #16
    Junior Member Statice's Avatar
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    Depends on what you are aiming for, and how long you can sustain a certain way of working.

    Some prefer to do what they are best at as work, and let what they wish they are best at for leisure time.
    Some merge the two, and end up doing what they are best at in a way they enjoy, or end up doing what they wish to do best, and after years become great at.
    Whatever suits your boat !

  7. #17
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    Considering I've had to leave my job because of the effect it was having on my mental health, I'd say his ideas don't work for everybody.

    I've spent my life following jobs in order to become specialised in the manner suggested, because I had the same thought: That I could become skilled at something, even without the love of it and then use that to make myself valuable and so end up in that favorable position.

    However the humanity of the situation gets in the way and there is a baseline to your nature, often invisible and yet flexible, but only so flexible. Bend it too much, too quickly and that's when you suffer from burnout. So I'm in my thirties, with nothing to show for it because I forced myself to do things I didn't love and the things I did love, were not profitable.

    Which isn't to say you shouldn't make the effort, but a lot of this type of advice is from people who have already become successful in their lives and all analysis is retrospective, even if it is done immediately, as something has to be experienced before it can be analysed.

    So people talk about the part they played and their own actions, but they don't often acknowledge the immutable nature of a situation or the luck of a situation.

    There are people who have come from the most horrible circumstances to then turn their life into a meaningful and successful one. These are inspiring and often can be admired, but there is always the doubt about all the other people in similar circumstances who never broke away.

    It takes immense amounts of resilience, fortitude, luck and (in many areas) a degree of moral compromise, in order to pursue something like that.
    So if you feel you have that fortitude, then go for it, just be really fucking careful, there's a lot of snake-oil salesmen out there.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
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  8. #18
    Senior Member Tengri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus View Post
    So I was reading a book called So Good They Can't Ignore You and the author says that following your passion or dream job is kinda bullshit. You need to get really good at something and make everyone knows about it. And when you reach this level you will get in your dream job, not because of what you do but because this gives an opportunity of being in more control of what you do when you do and this kind of stuff.

    He says that even when your job is stressing you, it's best to find a way to get specialized so people can come to you. What do you guys think about that? To you, it's best to find a job that fits it's strengths or develop your strengths in the career you already choose?
    This general advice is really context specific and depends on the industry and nature of work. Take healthcare, for instance: either a hospitalist or ICU and ER nurses have extremely stressful work environments with high risk and personal liability and long hours. Compare that to the low-key, slow pace of private practice specialist and office nurses and they may as well not be in the same field. Generally, though, it's important to find a career that is a compromise between your ideal self-image and dreamed of future and your inborn aptitude and personality traits. Chasing dreams however unlikely, can pay off for some. A childhood friend of mine has been an independent artist since her undergrad and now works in Budapest doing what she loves. Another became a nun (no, really). Others, like myself, chased a lot of different dreams and luckily found a field that combined these somewhat disparate interests in one kind of work. Of the fastest growing industries, specialization is mandatory and degree-dependent outside of trade work. To take my step-dad's sobering advice when I was a teenager, it's fine if you want to become an anthropologist, but you won't find a job after you graduate, over-educated and specialized or not. There has to be a market for your knowledge and degree.
    Likes The Cat liked this post

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