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  1. #31
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Your comment on the gym class thread the other day almost made me consider ESTJ.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurie View Post
    If this the fourth or fifth thread about this?

    Typewhore

    I know, it is fun and part of what I like most on type forums. I am interested in how people see me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thursday View Post
    so thats chart-the course for you, since you are clearly not an Extrovert.
    Yeah, I relate more to chart the course than behind the scenes.

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Your comment on the gym class thread the other day almost made me consider ESTJ.
    Someone else said that once. But nah, I don't think so. I am curious as to why that comment made you think that though.

  3. #33
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Someone else said that once. But nah, I don't think so. I am curious as to why that comment made you think that though.
    It seemed like an emphasis on right technique. Not that Ti eschews technique, but it goes for underlying rules first. And Se just wings it. As long as you don't break the rules of the game, there's no way right way of doing something. I think Te focuses on processes first though.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    It seemed like an emphasis on right technique. Not that Ti eschews technique, but it goes for underlying rules first. And Se just wings it. As long as you don't break the rules of the game, there's no way right way of doing something. I think Te focuses on processes first though.
    I became interested in sports through an interest in program design, in the correct process of skill development. My point was that there wasn't any emphasis on the underlying principles in skill development. You either had it or you didn't, education is a lifelong thing and their should be an emphasis on underlying principles.

  5. #35
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    I became interested in sports through an interest in program design, in the correct process of skill development. My point was that there wasn't any emphasis on the underlying principles in skill development. You either had it or you didn't, education is a lifelong thing and their should be an emphasis on underlying principles.
    Suit yourself. I just think any STP would have lost patience with too much process education, and said "STFU Lets play". Result, not process oriented. The result either being to have fun or winning. They would've been chastised for breaking some rules before sitting down and learning more of the process.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Suit yourself. I just think any STP would have lost patience with too much process education, and said "STFU Lets play". Result, not process oriented. The result either being to have fun or winning. They would've been chastised for breaking some rules before sitting down and learning more of the process.
    Maybe. But the underlying principles don't need to be taught initially. The system just needs to be based off them. As an istp got older you'd expect them to be interested in understanding underlying principles. Principles are a base to work from, not something that binds you. An inability or unwillingness to learn principles would eventually bind you in your development.

    The core principle to getting stronger is progressive overload. If you design a school sports system that ignores progressive overload you've failed in design.

    These are all things I discovered as I grew older. I enjoyed sports in primary school, played a season or more of lots of sports, rugby, softball, hockey, soccer, badminton, tennis and a few others. And didn't mope around class whining about a lack of focus on underlying principles. I began to dislike PE in high school but played a lot of sport during breaks. Actually, it was the rigid class design I didn't like. I played a lot of tennis in high school and enjoyed that, I think I just tend to like studying, practicing and learning at my own pace and design.

  7. #37
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Maybe. But the underlying principles don't need to be taught initially. The system just needs to be based off them. As an istp got older you'd expect them to be interested in understanding underlying principles. Principles are a base to work from, not something that binds you. An inability or unwillingness to learn principles would eventually bind you in your development.

    The core principle to getting stronger is progressive overload. If you design a school sports system that ignores progressive overload you've failed in design.

    These are all things I discovered as I grew older. I enjoyed sports in primary school, played a season or more of lots of sports, rugby, softball, hockey, soccer, badminton, tennis and a few others. And didn't mope around class whining about a lack of focus on underlying principles. I began to dislike PE in high school but played a lot of sport during breaks. Actually, it was the rigid class design I didn't like. I played a lot of tennis in high school and enjoyed that, I think I just tend to like studying, practicing and learning at my own pace and design.
    I'm just saying there's more jumping in involved. You get some basic rules, you look at others play and get an idea, you play. If someone says you're not doing it the right way, the result type says "Why? I'm winning." Same would go for, say, learning music. I left music class when it focused on posture and picking and fretboard techniques. I just wanted to rock. Getting a basic idea of how to finger, how to make a powerchord, how progressions work, and you're ready to go. Most SP kids wouldn't want to sit by just learning. They'd get antsy and grab the guitar out of someone's hand if they could.

    edit: BTW, that was just one post. I'm not necessarily retyping based on it. It just stuck out to me that you seem process oriented. It could possibly apply to FPs too, who wouldn't be confident in their own problem solving and defer to an authority or correct process on Te.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    I'm just saying there's more jumping in involved. You get some basic rules, you look at others play and get an idea, you play. If someone says you're not doing it the right way, the result type says "Why? I'm winning." Same would go for, say, learning music. I left music class when it focused on posture and picking and fretboard techniques. I just wanted to rock. Getting a basic idea of how to finger, how to make a powerchord, how progressions work, and you're ready to go. Most SP kids wouldn't want to sit by just learning. They'd get antsy and grab the guitar out of someone's hand if they could.
    Yeah, I'd agree with that. That would be the same for both isfp and istp. I'd say that in general the istp would eventually become interested in technique and skill development over the isfp temperament. More inclined to want to learn how and why it works like that.

  9. #39
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    What's my type again?

    What's my type again.

  10. #40
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Yeah, I'd agree with that. That would be the same for both isfp and istp. I'd say that in general the istp would eventually become interested in technique and skill development over the isfp temperament. More inclined to want to learn how and why it works like that.
    There isn't a period when STP truly just sits it out and gathers a lot of the "how and why". Not unless forced. They keep a basic blueprint how things work, and the individual "hows and whys" show themselves in emerging situations, when a problem poses new facts. Then they adapt. They tend to learn the "how and why" by problem solving in real time. Whether it's sports, music, fixing a sink, sex, a video game, whatever. Even when it comes to passive, theoretical things like this subject - typology. I didn't have a period of really bunkering down and educating myself. The pieces fall together more as I interact with the system. Maybe a little Ni pops in too and I get aha moments. Te has an eye on wanting to retain more facts, external nuances, each occurance of how things play out, predictability. So the educational process is different.

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