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  1. #21
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by comicsgurl View Post
    But he *does* look at her when she's tardy - gives her the evil eye, and such. On the other hand he doesn't follow through with the threat.

    Maybe it bugs him but he just doesn't say anything about it - or he's cataloging it for later....
    Possibility, but I was an hour and a half late the other day (I know, omgz.) because I slept through my alarm. The other boss (his wife) - maybe an ESTJ? - was seriously pissed. One of my co-workers told me she was thinking 'Omg, she's so fired."

    By the time I made it in neither of them were there, so it wasn't until that afternoon that this boss came in.

    He comes up to me and (this is all paraphrased) goes, "(Other boss) was about to blow her top this morning!" And I'm like "EepIknowI'msosorry." And he just sort of shakes his head, like 'What are we going to do with you?', and says "She was wondering how you were going to cope once you go out into the real world!" And I'm like, "Honestly I have no idea." And he sort of chuckles and goes, "You know, that's what I like about you, at least you're honest."

    And I'm like

    And that was the end of the situation!

    So, anyway. If he was cataloging my tardiness for later, this would have been the time he'd have brought it all out in evidence against me, I suspect. Thankfully, he seems to like me, so I still have a job.

    So, he's not an SJ.

    I am, however, pretty convinced he's Fe. Today, as we were leaving, one of my coworkers was rummaging in her purse as she walked out the door, sort of distracted, you know. And he goes (again paraphrasing), quite sharply, "What's this? What are you doing?". She's like "What?" and he's all grinning and like, "You didn't even say bye to us!" and she's like omg lol, "Right. See ya."

    That seems pretty Fe. Or possibly just him enjoying scaring us.

    Which really only leaves ENFJ, but I still don't know. He's so easygoing - can he really be a J? And in some ways he's really quite concrete. Of course, by that age he's probably pretty balanced in the functions, so it doesn't make it easy, but yeah.

    Random extra details: He worked as an Industrial/Mechanical Engineer (can't remember which) for years and years, and travelled across most of the world. Clearly an intelligent man. Although I wonder if the frustration with the computer and remembering how to do things there is more an age thing than a type thing. I really can't work out whether sensing or intuition would enable one to be better at remembering how to do something like operate the computer.
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

  2. #22
    Senior Member vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arcticangel02 View Post
    I really can't work out whether sensing or intuition would enable one to be better at remembering how to do something like operate the computer.
    I think intuition is a huge advantage in "remembering" certain computer operations. The development of user interfaces has always aimed to be as much intuitive as possible.

  3. #23
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vince View Post
    I think intuition is a huge advantage in "remembering" certain computer operations. The development of user interfaces has always aimed to be as much intuitive as possible.
    Why would that be? Especially since 70% of the population are Sensors and the companies want to make their interfaces as user-friendly as possible?
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

  4. #24
    Senior Member vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arcticangel02 View Post
    Why would that be? Especially since 70% of the population are Sensors and the companies want to make their interfaces as user-friendly as possible?
    I don't know, but it's the way it is.

    I found this text somewhere regarding user interfaces :
    Understanding How Intuitive Works
    Once you understand how ‘intuitive’ works—what makes someone perceive a design to be intuitive—it becomes easier to make the decision as to whether an intuitive design is worth the extra effort. The knowledge your users have when they arrive at the design (current knowledge), what knowledge they’ll need to complete their tasks (target knowledge), and what the design needs to do to help them complete the task (the gap) are the key ingredients for making an interface that seems ‘intuitive’ to your users.
    Maybe computer use is simply a niche of intuitives ? by which I do not mean that sensors don't use computers.
    In my job I've noticed there's 2 types of computer users : The ones to whom you have to spell it all out, sometimes slowly so they can write it down The ones you barely have to tell anything.

  5. #25
    Welcome to Sunnyside Mondo's Avatar
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    I am, however, pretty convinced he's Fe. Today, as we were leaving, one of my coworkers was rummaging in her purse as she walked out the door, sort of distracted, you know. And he goes (again paraphrasing), quite sharply, "What's this? What are you doing?". She's like "What?" and he's all grinning and like, "You didn't even say bye to us!" and she's like omg lol, "Right. See ya."
    One thing you must remember is that an ESFP can do this too. It can be argued that him saying that was due to an auxilliary Fi function which was telling him, "What does this person feel about me? She forgot to say goodbye to me- she's probably just a little preocupied and absent minded. I might as well remind her, :-)." No Feeling type is immune to the desire to do that.
    MBTI Type: iNTj
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  6. #26
    Plumage and Moult proteanmix's Avatar
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    This thread is kinda funny to me. I'm sure if any of you ever met my INFP boss, you'd type her as ISFJ. It's difficult at work to filter people's true type personalities unless they're cookie-cutter examples of type which few people are. People are dynamic and can exhibit nearly all functions within the space of an hour.

    For example, my boss is older and has developed her Si and Te. Her Fi-Ne tends to poke out when she's telling me about what books she's reading, current events, basically when we're talking about non-work related topics. If the opportunity for talking about non-work related topics is low, look for the way they talk about work, like what their end motivations are or why they're handling a situation the way they are. Also look for signs for tertiary and inferior functions. When I'm talking to another FJ I can see how Ti is operating within them and it's not always negative. Mostly it comes out in wanting to analyze other people's situations. Most INFP boss tends to what to physically order things and set up procedures when her Te is poking through and she definitely uses her Si has a well to draw from.

    I don't know if your boss is ENFJ or not, but I would caution against the stereotype that most intuitives are flighty and couldn't put the pants on without detailed instructions. Or that most sensors have photographic memories with every detail seared into their memory.

    I think it's good you picked up on the ESFP-ENFJ connection. I find often find certain types to be look alikes: ENTJ/ESTP, INTJ/ISTP, ENFJ/ESFP. If your boss is an ENFJ, what you may be seeing is tertiary Se poking through which may seem ESFPish. Especially since your boss is older, the Se may be more pronounced. Also when NJs are move into their negative shadows, they tend to look like bad SPs.

    One clue is the technical problem solving skills. My non-people problem solving skills suck ass. I can do prevention like nobody's business but once the prevention gets shot I'm basically useless. Also don't get caught up on typical "J" or "P" traits. The neatest and timeliest people I know are Ps and I know some seriously slothful Js. It just doesn't fit in a substantial number of circumstances. Your boss sounds generally good-natured if a bit scatterbrained. He sounds like he's bossy, but in a non-obvious way like he'll chide you and wrap it in a smile and joviality.

    How does he manage people and solve interpersonal problems? Does he actively try to head off problems or solve people problems or does he have the attitude that things will work themselves out? Does he try to lead by example? What makes him frustrates him about costumers and what does he like most about them?

  7. #27
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by proteanmix View Post
    This thread is kinda funny to me. I'm sure if any of you ever met my INFP boss, you'd type her as ISFJ. It's difficult at work to filter people's true type personalities unless they're cookie-cutter examples of type which few people are. People are dynamic and can exhibit nearly all functions within the space of an hour.
    Definitely, but because this guy owns the store (it's a franchise), he isn't necessarily as constrained by the work environment as someone somewhere in the middle of a corporate ladder may be. He's pretty free to run things how he pleases. So even though it's a work situation, more of his actual type will show through, I figure.

    We've also spent some time with him outside of work and he seems to behave mostly the same - if a little less fierce.

    I don't know if your boss is ENFJ or not, but I would caution against the stereotype that most intuitives are flighty and couldn't put the pants on without detailed instructions. Or that most sensors have photographic memories with every detail seared into their memory.
    Wise words!

    I think it's good you picked up on the ESFP-ENFJ connection. I find often find certain types to be look alikes: ENTJ/ESTP, INTJ/ISTP, ENFJ/ESFP. If your boss is an ENFJ, what you may be seeing is tertiary Se poking through which may seem ESFPish. Especially since your boss is older, the Se may be more pronounced. Also when NJs are move into their negative shadows, they tend to look like bad SPs.
    That could definitely be a possibility. He seems like a fairly healthy individual, (as best as I can tell) and naturally at his age he's going to be using even his inferior function to some extent.

    So ENFJs are Fe Ni Se Ti and ESFPs are Se Fi Te Ni. And the ones that are going to be most obvious: I should be on the lookout for Fe and Se or Se and Te. Hmmm.

    One clue is the technical problem solving skills. My non-people problem solving skills suck ass. I can do prevention like nobody's business but once the prevention gets shot I'm basically useless. Also don't get caught up on typical "J" or "P" traits. The neatest and timeliest people I know are Ps and I know some seriously slothful Js. It just doesn't fit in a substantial number of circumstances. Your boss sounds generally good-natured if a bit scatterbrained. He sounds like he's bossy, but in a non-obvious way like he'll chide you and wrap it in a smile and joviality.
    Re: J/P. Again, you're right. I fall into that trap too easily! But your descriptions sound about right. He's definitely not a pushover, even if he's being all pleasant and social.

    How does he manage people and solve interpersonal problems? Does he actively try to head off problems or solve people problems or does he have the attitude that things will work themselves out? Does he try to lead by example? What makes him frustrates him about costumers and what does he like most about them?
    He really hates the way those costumers try and dress him in all that nonsense. Frippery, I say!

    *cough* Back to the topic on hand:

    When a customer has a query for him, if he doesn't know exactly where the item is, he will do generally either give them a nonspecific affirmative, "Oh, yes, we're getting plenty of those in next week." (We may or may not be getting some more in, and may even have some in store now.) Or he'll pass the query off to us and ask us to check the stock levels and help the customer.

    He's usually pretty non-specific in his advice: while I try always to be honest, even if all I can tell the customer is "Yeah, we've sold a lot of them". He's usually saying something along the lines of "Oh, that's a good choice, mate." or "Great [product], that one."

    If a customer is getting cranky, (he always tells us to direct any problematic customers to one of the bosses, but I think that's fairly standard) he's usually direct but pretty lenient. Uses his special people skillz to calm the person down and maybe offer them something else. If a customer asks for a discount for whatever reason, more often than not they'll get it.

    When problems occur, I don't think he's so good at dealing with them spontaneously. Or maybe that's just the nature of the problems we tend to encounter. Hmm. But if something's proving challenging for us, he will usually say something along the lines of "Don't worry about it, leave it with me. You're okay, leave it with me." And then he'll focus his attention on it when he has plenty of time to do so.

    He generally lets us do our own thing, though. We know our jobs well enough (and I usually find that any problems I encounter, I can usually solve well enough myself and it would only be an extra complication to bring him into it) and so he lets us be, for the most part.

    And when making decisions about changes to the way things run (one eg. changing the way we store a particular item), he frequently seeks advice from us, and listens to our suggestions.

    The one little bit of authority he still has to deal with (the head offices of the franchise), he finds generally frustrating. They've lately increased the amount of control they have over our computer systems, and it just makes things more difficult for us. They've also got a 'Mystery Shopper' program which comes in and evaluates our customer service. He thinks it's irrelevant and meaningless and thinks they should do a 'Mystery Shoplifter' instead so he can work out ways to stop people stealing stuff. Apparently he's been pretty belligerent about this with Head Office. But of course, all I hear is what he tells me, so I can't really say for sure.

    Re: shoplifters, he enjoys telling us about one old lady he caught putting all this stuff in her handbag only after they noticed it happening regularly and put stuff in place to try and prevent it. "You would never suspect an old lady, but there you have it!" He might bluster a bit about how he'd chase after anyone he caught stealing with a bat swinging, but really he's pretty sensible about it all. Ready to confront someone if needs be, but naturally preferring not to.

    Hopefully that gives more of an idea. I think I'm starting to form an opinion, but it's not solid at all so I'm going to wait and see what a few of you think.
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

  8. #28
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mondo View Post
    One thing you must remember is that an ESFP can do this too. It can be argued that him saying that was due to an auxilliary Fi function which was telling him, "What does this person feel about me? She forgot to say goodbye to me- she's probably just a little preocupied and absent minded. I might as well remind her, :-)." No Feeling type is immune to the desire to do that.
    Yes, you're right, of course. But he puts on that "I'm mortally offended by your actions" face and voice so effectively that even if he's done it to you a thousand times, you still get scared that he's actually really angry. (And if you don't react properly he gives you this black stare for a few seconds before he relents.) And then he laughs, and you're like . By this stage, I'm pretty sure it might just be an amusing way for him to scare us, too. And possibly not able to be connected to any function at all!

    Actually, like the one time I've seen him genuinely angry (I broke a bit of equipment), he came up to me and sharply asked me what happened, and when I admitted that I was the last one to touch it before it stopped working, (I swear the machine did it on it's own, but whatever) he didn't waste too much time growling at me - he made it clear he was pissed, and then went off to fix the problem. And spent the next few weeks making jokes about not letting me near anything breakable. But they weren't really jokes, because if I did anything other than sort of sheepishly agree, his reaction was very much a sort of sharp frown. And he'd probably remind me how much it cost him to replace.
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

  9. #29
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=vince;227892]Maybe computer use is simply a niche of intuitives ? by which I do not mean that sensors don't use computers.[quote]

    I think we might be confusing the use of the word intuitive. In MBTI, intuitive has a whole lot more connotations than use of the word as a simple adjective. Here they seem to be using it to mean along the lines of 'self-explanatory'. A user-interface that can be picked up easily without laborious instruction.

    Just because an interface is described as 'intuitive' doesn't mean it has any advantage (or disadvantage, or anything really) for MBTI Intuitive types.

    In my job I've noticed there's 2 types of computer users : The ones to whom you have to spell it all out, sometimes slowly so they can write it down The ones you barely have to tell anything.
    Yes, I've noticed that too. I have no idea about the statistics, but in my experience it corellates somewhat with age - well, in that pretty much anyone under the age of about 25 has a good knowledge of computer use. I have no idea what the determining factor would be, though. Intelligence, maybe? I really don't think that's purely it.
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

  10. #30
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    After further close and meticulous examination (no, not really), I think I'm pretty sure he's an ENFJ.

    We were talking the other day and he picked up an atlas to illustrate a point he was making and happened to mention that atlases and all that random factual country information and such fascinated him, that he could pore over it for hours.

    Also, on another point, he was trying to describe why he didn't really like this and that, and expressed that he didn't want to sound shallow, or anything - he knew I'd understand, but lots of people wouldn't.

    Both those things sort of made me think Intuitive over Sensor, anyway.
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

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