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  1. #1
    Senior Member Tiger Owl's Avatar
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    Default Changing types based on which test was taken? Input welcome.

    I find this very intriguing. I always test very strongly - I TJ with about 50/50 S/N including very recently. However, I just took the www.keys2cognition.com version and got the results:


    Cognitive Process Level of Development (Preference, Skill and Frequency of Use)
    extraverted Sensing (Se) **************************** (28.9)
    average use
    introverted Sensing (Si) ***************************** (29.9)
    average use
    extraverted Intuiting (Ne) *********************************** (35.1)
    good use
    introverted Intuiting (Ni) ***************************** (29.7)
    average use
    extraverted Thinking (Te) ************************************** (38.2)
    excellent use
    introverted Thinking (Ti) ********************************** (34.2)
    good use
    extraverted Feeling (Fe) ********* (9.4)
    unused
    introverted Feeling (Fi) ********************************** (34.8)
    good use
    Summary Analysis of Profile
    By focusing on the strongest configuration of cognitive processes, your pattern of responses most closely matches individuals of this type: INFP

    Lead (Dominant) Process
    Introverted Feeling (Fi): Staying true to who you really are. Paying close attention to your personal identity, values and beliefs. Checking with your conscience. Choosing behavior congruent with what is important to you.

    Support (Auxilliary) Process
    Extraverted Intuiting (Ne): Exploring the emerging patterns. Wondering about patterns of interaction across various situations. Checking what hypotheses and meanings fit best. Trusting what emerges as you shift a situation’s dynamics.

    If these cognitive processes don't fit well then consider these types: ENFP, or INTP

    -------------------


    -Some of these results seem counterintuitive to what I know about myself. Are the results contradictory? Thoughts, insights?
    INTJ 5w4 sx/sp 584 ILI-Ni

  2. #2
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    Take the official MBTI or the official Keirsey to get your four dichotomy type (you have to pay for it, Keirsey is cheaper).

    But if you want to decide your type by function theory, a test really isn't a good way to go, you have to study the functions and type by study and observation, et al. However, I happen to think the newest, improved function test they have on Personality Cafe is pretty good.

    If you're consistently identifying with ITJ or Te, then you just need to figure out if you have Si or Ni.

  3. #3
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    I have scored as every EJ combo there is, although only ESTJ once. ESFJ is the plurality, followed closely by ENFJ. I am about 50/50 S vs. N and 55/45 F vs. T on average. About 85% E and 60-65% J.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  4. #4
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    Actually it occurs to me that if you want to go the Keirsey route and you're split on S/N, look and see which temperament is more you (NT or SJ). In my case I consistently test as INFP or ENFP, and got INFP and xNFP respectively on the official MBTI and the official Keirsey. HOWEVER, I identify a bit more with the SP temperament than the NF, as well as the Hedonist versus the Idealist in PTypes which would suggest that I am actually SFP (DEFINITELY FP!!!)

    So by looking into functions, you apparently do like Fi and Te if you're consistently getting IxTJ and somehow weirdly got Fi/Ne on a function test ...though I really don't think keys2cognition is a good way to approach function theory. I recommend reading Jung and Beebe and actually deciding through knowledge of yourself and perhaps other people's input if you're more inclined to type yourself through function theory, which is something I personally STRONGLY suggest that you do.

  5. #5
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    Eh, don't go by tests. It depends on how they are worded and a whole bunch of other factors. I personally test all over the board, there are only a few types that I've never gotten.
    06/13 10:51:03 five sounds: you!!!
    06/13 10:51:08 shortnsweet: no you!!
    06/13 10:51:12 shortnsweet: go do your things and my things too!
    06/13 10:51:23 five sounds: oh hell naw
    06/13 10:51:55 shortnsweet: !!!!
    06/13 10:51:57 shortnsweet: (cries)
    06/13 10:52:19 RiftsWRX: You two are like furbies stuck in a shoe box

    My Nohari
    My Johari
    by sns.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Tiger Owl's Avatar
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    Well. Now I am pissed. I hate wasted effort. I had just typed up a long response to your first post and when I hit submit I was redirected to the WiFi sign in page at the bookstore I am in and I lost the entire post.

    Thank you for taking the time to respond. I am interested in function theory and will pursue it further. I did not give much credence to the keys2cognition version as it has been the only outlier to date in over a decade. I will eventually take the licensed version but until then I will read up. I know my self very well and I am interested in typology as a way to delve deeper into the esoteric nature behind the nature, not in any way to validate or decide my personality.
    Last edited by Tiger Owl; 09-23-2011 at 04:42 PM.
    INTJ 5w4 sx/sp 584 ILI-Ni

  7. #7
    Senior Member Tiger Owl's Avatar
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    Shortnsweet, I had suspected that and I am very suspicious of anything subjective unless it starts in my mind and can then be objectively pursued and teased out by yours truly.
    INTJ 5w4 sx/sp 584 ILI-Ni

  8. #8
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    Based on your user name containing number and being pissed about wasted effort, I want to say you should stick with IxTJ.

    Just for fun read about Keirsey SJs...specifically the motivations and where they get their self-esteem from, like the matrices of the temperaments. It seems to ESPECIALLY describe ISTJs, I swear that I feel like I'm reading about my ISTJ when I read it, and he says it fits him too. I think in some regards it may fit ISTJ the best of the four SJs (I unfortunately find Keirsey to be a little too generalized, and you may have to make yourself ignore his stereotypes about things like sexuality and/or religion).

    You could take the PTypes temperament test, too. http://www.ptypes.com/temperament_test.html

    You can see if you come out significantly higher on Rationalist or Traditionalist, which is similar to Keirsey's Rationals and Guardians...

    As for function theory, you can read Ni vs. Si here if you have time: http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Jung/types.htm

    The Introverted Sensation Type

    The priority of introverted sensation produces a definite type, which is characterized by certain peculiarities. It is an irrational type, inasmuch as its selection among occurrences is not primarily rational, but is guided rather [p. 501] by what just happens. Whereas, the extraverted sensation-type is determined by the intensity of the objective influence, the introverted type is orientated by the intensity of the subjective sensation-constituent released by the objective stimulus. Obviously, therefore, no sort of proportional relation exists between object and sensation, but something that is apparently quite irregular and arbitrary judging from without, therefore, it is practically impossible to foretell what will make an impression and what will not. If there were present a capacity and readiness for expression in any way commensurate with the strength of sensation, the irrationality of this type would be extremely evident. This is the case, for instance, when the individual is a creative artist. But, since this is the exception, it usually happens that the characteristic introverted difficulty of expression also conceals his irrationality. On the contrary, he may actually stand out by the very calmness and passivity of his demeanour, or by his rational self-control. This peculiarity, which often leads the superficial judgment astray, is really due to his unrelatedness to objects. Normally the object is not consciously depreciated in the least, but its stimulus is removed from it, because it is immediately replaced by a subjective reaction, which is no longer related to the reality of the object. This, of course, has the same effect as a depreciation of the object. Such a type can easily make one question why one should exist at all; or why objects in general should have any right to existence, since everything essential happens without the object. This doubt may be justified in extreme cases, though not in the normal, since the objective stimulus is indispensable to his sensation, only it produces something different from what was to be surmised from the external state of affairs. Considered from without, it looks as though the effect of the object [p. 502] did not obtrude itself upon the subject. This impression is so far correct inasmuch as a subjective content does, in fact, intervene from the unconscious, thus snatching away the effect of the object. This intervention may be so abrupt that the individual appears to shield himself directly from any possible influence of the object. In any aggravated or well-marked case, such a protective guard is also actually present. Even with only a slight reinforcement of the unconscious, the subjective constituent of sensation becomes so alive that it almost completely obscures the objective influence. The results of this are, on the one hand, a feeling of complete depreciation on the part of the object, and, on the other, an illusory conception of reality on the part of the subject, which in morbid cases may even reach the point of a complete inability to discriminate between the real object and the subjective perception. Although so vital a distinction vanishes completely only in a practically psychotic state, yet long before that point is reached subjective perception may influence thought, feeling, and action to an extreme degree, in spite of the fact that the object is clearly seen in its fullest reality. Whenever the objective influence does succeed in forcing its way into the subject -- as the result of particular circumstances of special intensity, or because of a more perfect analogy with the unconscious image -- even the normal example of this type is induced to act in accordance with his unconscious model. Such action has an illusory quality in relation to objective reality, and therefore has a very odd and strange character. It instantly reveals the anti-real subjectivity of the type, But, where the influence of the object does not entirely succeed, it encounters a benevolent neutrality, disclosing little sympathy, yet constantly striving to reassure and adjust. The too-low is raised a little, the too-high is made a little lower; the enthusiastic is damped, the [p. 503] extravagant restrained; and the unusual brought within the 'correct' formula: all this in order to keep the influence of the object within the necessary bounds. Thus, this type becomes an affliction to his circle, just in so far as his entire harmlessness is no longer above suspicion. But, if the latter should be the case, the individual readily becomes a victim to the aggressiveness and ambitions of others. Such men allow themselves to be abused, for which they usually take vengeance at the most unsuitable occasions with redoubled stubbornness and resistance. When there exists no capacity for artistic expression, all impressions sink into the inner depths, whence they hold consciousness under a spell, removing any possibility it might have had of mastering the fascinating impression by means of conscious expression. Relatively speaking, this type has only archaic possibilities of expression for the disposal of his impressions; thought and feeling are relatively unconscious, and, in so far as they have a certain consciousness, they only serve in the necessary, banal, every-day expressions. Hence as conscious functions, they are wholly unfitted to give any adequate rendering of the subjective perceptions. This type, therefore, is uncommonly inaccessible to an objective understanding and he fares no better in the understanding of himself.

    Above all, his development estranges him from the reality of the object, handing him over to his subjective perceptions, which orientate his consciousness in accordance with an archaic reality, although his deficiency in comparative judgment keeps him wholly unaware of this fact. Actually he moves in a mythological world, where men animals, railways, houses, rivers, and mountains appear partly as benevolent deities and partly as malevolent demons. That thus they, appear to him never enters his mind, although their effect upon his judgments and acts can bear no other interpretation. He judges and acts as [p. 504] though he had such powers to deal with; but this begins to strike him only when he discovers that his sensations are totally different from reality. If his tendency is to reason objectively, he will sense this difference as morbid; but if, on the other hand, he remains faithful to his irrationality, and is prepared to grant his sensation reality value, the objective world will appear a mere make-belief and a comedy. Only in extreme cases, however, is this dilemma reached. As a rule, the individual acquiesces in his isolation and in the banality of the reality, which, however, he unconsciously treats archaically.

    His unconscious is distinguished chiefly by the repression of intuition, which thereby acquires an extraverted and archaic character. Whereas true extraverted intuition has a characteristic resourcefulness, and a 'good nose' for every possibility in objective reality, this archaic, extraverted intuition has an amazing flair for every ambiguous, gloomy, dirty, and dangerous possibility in the background of reality. In the presence of this intuition the real and conscious intention of the object has no significance; it will peer behind every possible archaic antecedent of such an intention. It possesses, therefore, something dangerous, something actually undermining, which often stands in most vivid contrast to the gentle benevolence of consciousness. So long as the individual is not too aloof from the object, the unconscious intuition effects a wholesome compensation to the rather fantastic and over credulous attitude of consciousness. But as soon as the unconscious becomes antagonistic to consciousness, such intuitions come to the surface and expand their nefarious influence: they force themselves compellingly upon the individual, releasing compulsive ideas about objects of the most perverse kind. The neurosis arising from this sequence of events is usually a compulsion neurosis, in which the hysterical characters recede and are obscured by symptoms of exhaustion. [p. 505]

    *OR*

    9. The Introverted Intuitive Type

    The peculiar nature of introverted intuition, when given the priority, also produces a peculiar type of man, viz. the mystical dreamer and seer on the one hand, or the fantastical crank and artist on the other. The latter might be regarded as the normal case, since there is a general tendency of this type to confine himself to the perceptive character of intuition. As a rule, the intuitive stops at perception; perception is his principal problem, and -- in the case of a productive artist-the shaping of perception. But the crank contents himself with the intuition by which he himself is shaped and determined. Intensification of intuition naturally often results in an extraordinary aloofness of the individual from tangible reality; he may even become a complete enigma to his own immediate circle. [p. 509]

    If an artist, he reveals extraordinary, remote things in his art, which in iridescent profusion embrace both the significant and the banal, the lovely and the grotesque, the whimsical and the sublime. If not an artist, he is frequently an unappreciated genius, a great man 'gone wrong', a sort of wise simpleton, a figure for 'psychological' novels.

    Although it is not altogether in the line of the introverted intuitive type to make of perception a moral problem, since a certain reinforcement of the rational functions is required for this, yet even a relatively slight differentiation of judgment would suffice to transfer intuitive perception from the purely æsthetic into the moral sphere. A variety of this type is thus produced which differs essentially from its æsthetic form, although none the less characteristic of the introverted intuitive. The moral problem comes into being when the intuitive tries to relate himself to his vision, when he is no longer satisfied with mere perception and its æsthetic shaping and estimation, but confronts the question: What does this mean for me and for the world? What emerges from this vision in the way of a duty or task, either for me or for the world? The pure intuitive who represses judgment or possesses it only under the spell of perception never meets this question fundamentally, since his only problem is the How of perception. He, therefore, finds the moral problem unintelligible, even absurd, and as far as possible forbids his thoughts to dwell upon the disconcerting vision. It is different with the morally orientated intuitive. He concerns himself with the meaning of his vision; he troubles less about its further æsthetic possibilities than about the possible moral effects which emerge from its intrinsic significance. His judgment allows him to discern, though often only darkly, that he, as a man and as a totality, is in some way inter-related with his vision, that [p. 510] it is something which cannot just be perceived but which also would fain become the life of the subject. Through this realization he feels bound to transform his vision into his own life. But, since he tends to rely exclusively upon his vision, his moral effort becomes one-sided; he makes himself and his life symbolic, adapted, it is true, to the inner and eternal meaning of events, but unadapted to the actual present-day reality. Therewith he also deprives himself of any influence upon it, because he remains unintelligible. His language is not that which is commonly spoken -- it becomes too subjective. His argument lacks convincing reason. He can only confess or pronounce. His is the 'voice of one crying in the wilderness'.

    The introverted intuitive's chief repression falls upon the sensation of the object. His unconscious is characterized by this fact. For we find in his unconscious a compensatory extraverted sensation function of an archaic character. The unconscious personality may, therefore, best be described as an extraverted sensation-type of a rather low and primitive order. Impulsiveness and unrestraint are the characters of this sensation, combined with an extraordinary dependence upon the sense impression. This latter quality is a compensation to the thin upper air of the conscious attitude, giving it a certain weight, so that complete 'sublimation' is prevented. But if, through a forced exaggeration of the conscious attitude, a complete subordination to the inner perception should develop, the unconscious becomes an opposition, giving rise to compulsive sensations whose excessive dependence upon the object is in frank conflict with the conscious attitude. The form of neurosis is a compulsion-neurosis, exhibiting symptoms that are partly hypochondriacal manifestations, partly hypersensibility of the sense organs and partly compulsive ties to definite persons or other objects. [p. 511]

  9. #9
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by earthtrekker1775 View Post
    Cognitive Process Level of Development (Preference, Skill and Frequency of Use)
    extraverted Sensing (Se) **************************** (28.9)
    average use
    introverted Sensing (Si) ***************************** (29.9)
    average use
    extraverted Intuiting (Ne) *********************************** (35.1)
    good use
    introverted Intuiting (Ni) ***************************** (29.7)
    average use
    extraverted Thinking (Te) ************************************** (38.2)
    excellent use
    introverted Thinking (Ti) ********************************** (34.2)
    good use
    extraverted Feeling (Fe) ********* (9.4)
    unused
    introverted Feeling (Fi) ********************************** (34.8)
    good use
    Summary Analysis of Profile
    By focusing on the strongest configuration of cognitive processes, your pattern of responses most closely matches individuals of this type: INFP

    Just based on my observation of INFPs & their results on cognitive functions tests, this doesn't fit the INFP pattern. Few score that high on Te; it's much more common for it to be one of their lowest scoring functions (they will actually score higher on Ti, because it is introverted judging like Fi & they identify with the "attitude").

    However, sometimes the same is true of INTPs; they score well on Fi because it's Ji (introverted judging), but not high on Fe as it's their inferior function. Since you score about equally well on Ti & Ne as Fi, INTP is as much of a possibility as INFP, just based on these results.

    My other observation is Ns tend to score high on BOTH Ne & Ni, as the descriptions don't differentiate the two very well, and so they just read as "intuitive". Your scores are pretty even all around though, with the sensory scores being about the same as Ni. Looking at this, it just tells me you're probably NOT an xxFJ & that you likely prefer Te to judge.

    Since the most clear thing here is a Te preference for judging, which this test & your previous tests indicate, then I'd compare all of the xxTJ profiles. If you are indeed an introvert & an IxTJ as you suspect, then Fi is your tertiary & that may explain why you identify pretty strongly with it. The N/S scores are all pretty even for you, so regarding functions, I'd start looking at Si & Ni definitions, and then go from there if you need more info.

    In brief - likely not an xxFJ, likely a xxTJ, remote possibility of being an INxP. Go read more!
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  10. #10
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    That test shows me having good Fi and Fe, and good Ni and good Ne, which is how I experience it. The differences in scores are only slight.

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