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  1. #11
    You have a choice! 21%'s Avatar
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    Based on just my feelings, you sound more INTP than INFP...

    Try to think back to your childhood. Do you relate more to this: http://www.personalitypage.com/html/ITP.html
    or this:
    http://www.personalitypage.com/html/IFP.html
    4w5 sp/sx EII

  2. #12
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vizzy View Post
    As you said, it would be interesting to get opinions from INTPs too. But it certainly is helpful to see how my answers relate to INFPs.
    I agree... any INTPs want to chime in?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vizzy View Post
    When people ask what your mood is, are you able (or do you feel the need) to elaborate or at least give an descriptive answer? When I get asked how I feel, I usually just manage a "Meh, I'm alright" or one-word answers that I give merely for the sake of giving a reply.
    Well, I certainly don't' go into elaborate detail when people ask a polite "How're you?" Like most folks, I usually answer "fine," or "not too bad" or whatever. That's just understanding the level of detail (and honestly) people are asking for.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vizzy View Post
    What you said about an "emotional signature" in your relationships with various people is interesting. Out of curiosity, would you mind elaborating on that a bit?
    When I was a kid, each toy and person had a very specific emotional "feel." That is, that particular toy or person would evoke a particular set of emotional and aesthetic responses when perceived. These kind of acted (for me) as an identifying signature for the thing or person when I thought about it.

    For example, imagine a favorite painting (or other work of art) from a museum you've enjoyed for years. You like it because it evokes a particular set of responses when you view it. Perhaps viewing it evokes a sense of tension or one of serenity. Perhaps it evokes a sense of balance or one of motion. Perhaps it evokes a sense of timelessness or ephemerality. Perhaps the subject matter or scene invokes sadness, happiness, loneliness, connectedness or whatever.

    Then, add to that the emotional elements surrounding your visits to the museum to visit it. Perhaps it also evokes a sense of viewing it as a child, or your love (or dislike) of trips to the museum, maybe a little guilt that you don't go to the museum more often, etc.

    Now, all those emotions and internal responses together create a kind of unique mix of feelings that are what the painting means to you on an aesthetic and emotional level. You never just experience just one feeling towards the painting (although certainly one feeling is likely to predominate at any moment)... the other feelings are always there, underneath or intermixed.

    So, as an adult I'm not as consciously aware of the "signature" of particular objects, although people still have a particular "feel" for me. And I remain aware of my emotions and perceptions shifting as I view and interact with the world around me. An unexpected or unexplained shift in emotion often works as a kind of alarm bell that something needs attention.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vizzy View Post
    I accept that there are always reasons behind emotions although they mightn't be valid everytime. Rather than drop everything and fix my attention on my emotional state, I'm more likely to push it aside...and eventually it fades away. By the time I have the time to analyze the reasoning behind it, my interest is on something else. I do try, though. When I do take the time to wallow in my feelings, it's quite therapeutic.
    I'm not sure I'd ever say an emotion is invalid... although it might have been triggered by an invalid perception or misunderstanding, and may be inconvenient, socially inappropriate or hurtful to express. But the emotion itself simply is, and it neither good nor bad on its own.

    And for an Fi-dom, I think it's difficult to simply ignore our emotional state without giving up a lot ability to perceive. Fi-doms try to harmonize their actions with their feelings and values. When dealing with upset, it's hard to perceive much else, so acting authentically with one's whole self becomes difficult at best. Also, the perceptions of the emotions of others becomes muddied when we are distracted by our own emotional upset.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vizzy View Post
    This is also very interesting. ...the idea of empathizing and offering support before understanding the situation. What if the person is overreacting? What if the situation isn't as bad as he/she thinks? On the other hand, I understand there are times where I'm so upset, I just want someone to comfort and cry with me. Surely everyone has "this isn't the best time for advice!" moments. But if you're asking how I'd offer advice if it was asked for, I'd start by getting all the details.
    INFPs are sometimes called "clarifying harmonizers," and—as much as that phrase makes me roll my eyes—there's some truth to it. I think we tend to want to build up a model of the other person's emotional perspective as a first step. There's a practical aspect to this, because advice that's out of sync with where another person is often can't be heard, much less followed. What's objectively and impersonally the simplest solution often doesn't matter if it's psychologically impossible (or requires far too much energy) for someone to understand and implement.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vizzy View Post
    As for your intent vs correctness question, could you please elaborate on that a tad more? (Sorry - I'm always asking for elaboration.)
    Well, I was trying to be more open ended, but Fi-doms often place a lot of emphasis on the intent of the other person. Part of this is, I think, because of the personal nature of Fi judgments and the difficulty of communicating the reasoning behind them. Given the lack of an external, objective standard for Fi, intent is often about all one has to judge the actions of others.

    Ti-doms, on the other hand, usually are more focused on correctness and precision than Fi-doms are. The first reaction of Ti-doms (at least internally) when faced with an illogical or sloppy argument is not to let it slide because the other person means well or feels strongly about it. Of course, INTPs, too, are "behind the scenes" types and are fine with avoiding conflict (contrast with ENTPs, who don't mind poking the hornet's nest for pure entertainment, on occasion).

    At any rate, I'm strongly learning towards INTP for you over INFP.

  3. #13
    (blankpages) Xenon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    I agree... any INTPs want to chime in?
    I'll answer the questions. I'm an INTP who also started off confused about my T/F preference, but I am now I'm fairly certain I'm T. I think I'm 5w4 as well, but I'm not as well versed in the enneagram so I'm not as sure of that. These 'type me' threads aren't that widely read, so you may not get much responses.


    One thing I'd like to hear about is your relationship to your emotions. Are they valuable input to your decision making process, or are they more of a distraction? Are you aware of your emotions in real time, or do you figure out you were angry or upset after the fact? How aware are you of your emotions, and do you experience your emotions as multilayered with many subtle variations or more singly (whatever the intensity)?

    I am plenty aware of my emotions in real time, and I'm usually aware of their cause. I don't think I experience them with as much detail as you, Seymour, described. They aren't always one single emotion, but they can usually be described in a few words. That was interesting to read: I've always thought of myself (and been described by other people) as very introspective and self-aware, but when it comes to emotional responses to people or objects or events, I don't have that kind of nuanced awareness.

    I definitely don't find my emotions helpful as a guide to decision making. Not that I don't act on my emotions, but it's almost always unhelpful for me to do so. I decided to quit a job recently because I was feeling overwhelmed, and immediately regretted it. I decide to procrastinate on important stuff all the time because I feel unsure of myself, and as a result I feel stuck and can't get anything done. As a teenager I actually used to test on the T/F borderline, because I'd read questions about decision making and think of all these ways I've made stupid decisions because of my feelings (oh yeah, I skipped class yesterday afternoon because I didn't feel like going). It wasn't until coming here and reading some stuff F types have written that their use of feelings could get quite a bit more intricate and detailed than this. I don't really get it when INFPs talk about using their emotions as a guide or a perception tool.

    It isn't that I ignore my emotions or that I'm unaware of them, but I don't find them particularly "useful". At times I feel the need to examine them so I can be sure they aren't interfering with my judgement. I often ask myself things like, Is this really true or do I just want it to be true? Am I dismissing possibility x because I fear or dread it? What if I've been assuming y just because it makes me feel better? I seem to get the most clarity that way, by being aware of my emotions or wishes but trying to reason as independently from them as I can.


    How do you feel about and react to "inappropriate" emotions (both your own and in people around you)? How do you feel about social obligations and expectations? How aware are you of group dynamics? How about the emotional state of individuals?

    I don't really judge emotions themselves as inappropriate. I've always found it pointless to feel guilty over mere feelings or wishes, etc. I think there can certainly be inappropriate use of them or inappropriate times to express them. And I can get very annoyed if tries to use them inappropriately to argue a point, or when someone acts like it's wrong to make a case for an idea or position that upsets them.

    Social expectations...I don't mind the simple stuff. As long as they don't require me to pretend to be something I'm not, I deal with them. I hate being expected to say or do something dishonest just because I'm supposed to (for example, going to church and going through the motions even though I don't believe, just because "that's what families do"), and I avoid that whenever possible. Otherwise, I'm pretty easygoing. I can be oblivious to the more subtle expectations though, so I can sometimes come across as a bit socially clumsy.

    I guess group dynamics and people's emotional states are things I can easily miss when I'm tuned out, but if I make an conscious effort to focus in on them I can read these things as well as most people. I think.


    When a friend is suffering, do you tend to offer advice? If so, what kind of advice?


    I often feel pretty useless when others are suffering. I'm generally not a natural empath, and I'm prone to feeling awkward when I don't have anything of substance to say to them. Trying to just listen and reflect on the speaker's feelings feels odd and forced to me, like I'm acting. I like to offer suggestions when I have them, mention other possibilities if someone is making unfounded assumptions, clarify things if their thinking is off in some way. If there's nothing like that to do, then I'm at a loss.

    Also, how highly do you rate the importance of intent vs. correctness?

    Um...well, I tend to focus more on the correctness of what is being said. I notice poor logic quite easily and it often bugs me (especially if the person's got a lot of other things on their side that I know will likely sway other people: strong emotion or a confident demeanor or social charm...).

    When it comes to feeling judgements about good vs. bad, I seem to focus on results more than intent. I had this therapist once whom I'm pretty sure was INFP...I remember when I used to mention certain things he did and how they'd bother me or make me self-conscious, he'd stress that wasn't his intention. And it became a bit frustrating to me, because I was trying to talk about the effect of what he was doing, and he seemed to be turning the focus toward something less relevant.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Vizzy's Avatar
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    Thanks, 21% and Seymour.
    I relate to both the IFP and ITP-child descriptions. I was quiet, serious about everything I did, curious, not demonstrative of feelings, crazy about books, was liked by all because I was nice but had only 1 or 2 close-ish friends but was nevertheless a loner.
    On the other hand, I don't recall being particularly logical or objective but very idealistic and gentle. At school, I tried my best at every subject because failure wasn't an option. I wanted to please my parents and teachers and they'd tell you I was far from a problem child.

    ITP kids need for things to be fair in order for them to be comfortable. They want rules to be enforced consistently for everyone, and will become upset over any perceived favoritism. They have a strong sense of fair play and will treat others fairly. They also expect to be treated fairly, and may become quite upset if they aren't.
    I DO remember being annoyed at unfairness. There was one time where I stayed up til 2am perfecting and finishing up an assignment. It was due the next day but because so many turned up whining about not having enough time, the teacher suddenly decided to give everyone a couple of hours to finish up their projects before handing it in. I can't tell you how frustrated I was at the whole situation. I'm not sure if this is just an ITP thing. The fact was that the other students who didn't follow the rules got the rules bent in their favour by a teacher who happened to feel sorry for them...

    Seymour, your explanation of the emotional feel was so nicely put. It really makes me think of the Si function too. Nostalgia is a HUGE thing for me. I'd like to think that everyone attaches a particular feeling (or feelings) to objects, art, experiences and people. Is this just magnified for INFPs?

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    I'm not sure I'd ever say an emotion is invalid... although it might have been triggered by an invalid perception or misunderstanding, and may be inconvenient, socially inappropriate or hurtful to express. But the emotion itself simply is, and it neither good nor bad on its own.
    I may have mentioned it before but I've always thought I was an empathetic person. That said, there are many times I can be totally unconcerned and downright dismissive of people's feelings when I think they're irrational, overdramatic and unwarranted. Ugh, I nearly feel evil for saying that.
    I do agree that an emotion is neither good or bad on its own. As you said, it just is, and to call it void would be like accusing a person of laughing incorrectly. But I still find myself judging emotions as "appropriate" vs "unnecessary"...and should be dismissed if the latter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    INFPs are sometimes called "clarifying harmonizers," and—as much as that phrase makes me roll my eyes—there's some truth to it. I think we tend to want to build up a model of the other person's emotional perspective as a first step. There's a practical aspect to this, because advice that's out of sync with where another person is often can't be heard, much less followed. What's objectively and impersonally the simplest solution often doesn't matter if it's psychologically impossible (or requires far too much energy) for someone to understand and implement.
    That makes perfect sense. Before you try to get a hold of details and things like "What did he/she say?/And then what did you say?" (as part of my question-bombardment), you try to get on their level first and, at the same time, make sure they feel/trust that advice will be coming from someone who actually understands and empathizes with them. Is that right?
    While I am known by friends as a great listener, I would feel as though I was acting, as blankpages said.
    For me, I usually skim over that step because I doubt I'd genuinely understand what they feel...though I am often happy to just listen and nod.

    As for intent versus correctness, I'm trying hard to think of a recent example to show which way I swing since both are important. I'd probably rate correctness higher as that's what's actual at the end of the day, as opposed to something as fuzzy and hard to decipher as intent.

    I'm re-reading my answers here and realised how much of the INTP in me you've managed to get out. Of course, second, third and fourth opinions to confirm this is what I also want.

    So, thanks for all this.

    And blankpages, I really resonate with a lot of what you wrote, particularly
    Is this really true or do I just want it to be true? Am I dismissing possibility x because I fear or dread it? What if I've been assuming y just because it makes me feel better?
    which is something I always find myself asking.
    I'd also like to know if Feeling types also often experience these questions.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member Silveresque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    I am plenty aware of my emotions in real time, and I'm usually aware of their cause.
    Same here.

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    I definitely don't find my emotions helpful as a guide to decision making.
    I consider emotions important, but I usually don't make decisions based on emotion alone. My Fi realizes it isn't qualified to make reasonable decisions without first consulting Ti.

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    I don't really get it when INFPs talk about using their emotions as a guide or a perception tool.
    I'm not sure I understand that either, to be honest.

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    I often ask myself things like, Is this really true or do I just want it to be true? Am I dismissing possibility x because I fear or dread it? What if I've been assuming y just because it makes me feel better? I seem to get the most clarity that way, by being aware of my emotions or wishes but trying to reason as independently from them as I can.
    I can relate to this as well. I wonder if this might be a perceiving trait, or if it's specifically Ti analysis.

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    I don't really judge emotions themselves as inappropriate. I've always found it pointless to feel guilty over mere feelings or wishes, etc. I think there can certainly be inappropriate use of them or inappropriate times to express them. And I can get very annoyed if tries to use them inappropriately to argue a point, or when someone acts like it's wrong to make a case for an idea or position that upsets them.
    I agree with you completely. All emotions are valid, but it's not always appropriate to express them. I also find argument based solely on feeling annoying.

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    Social expectations...I don't mind the simple stuff. As long as they don't require me to pretend to be something I'm not, I deal with them. I hate being expected to say or do something dishonest just because I'm supposed to (for example, going to church and going through the motions even though I don't believe, just because "that's what families do"), and I avoid that whenever possible. Otherwise, I'm pretty easygoing. I can be oblivious to the more subtle expectations though, so I can sometimes come across as a bit socially clumsy.
    Sounds pretty much like me.

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    I often feel pretty useless when others are suffering. I'm generally not a natural empath, and I'm prone to feeling awkward when I don't have anything of substance to say to them. Trying to just listen and reflect on the speaker's feelings feels odd and forced to me, like I'm acting. I like to offer suggestions when I have them, mention other possibilities if someone is making unfounded assumptions, clarify things if their thinking is off in some way. If there's nothing like that to do, then I'm at a loss.
    I'm exactly the same way. Sometimes the only thing I can say is "Well, there's not really anything we can do about it..."

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    When it comes to feeling judgements about good vs. bad, I seem to focus on results more than intent.
    I don't believe there has to be a focus on one or the other, since results and intent don't necessarily apply to the same type of thing. When you're judging results, you're deciding whether the choice was good or bad, and when you're judging intent, you're deciding whether the person was good or bad. For example, if someone has good intentions but the results are bad, that makes the choice bad, but not the person. At least, that's how I see it.

    I'm an INFP, yet my answers are pretty much the same blankpages's answers. Either I'm wrong in my own typing or the line between INFP's and INTP's is quite thin. I seem to act and even think more like an INTP these days, and if I didn't think back to how I was as a child, I would probably never know I'm an INFP. Anyways, just figured it might be helpful to have an INFP perspective as well.

  6. #16
    (blankpages) Xenon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    I'm an INFP, yet my answers are pretty much the same blankpages's answers. Either I'm wrong in my own typing or the line between INFP's and INTP's is quite thin. I seem to act and even think more like an INTP these days, and if I didn't think back to how I was as a child, I would probably never know I'm an INFP. Anyways, just figured it might be helpful to have an INFP perspective as well.
    Well, logically there is a third possibility: I'm wrong about my type. So I appreciate your assumption that I'm not.

    If you'd "never know" you were INFP based on your current thinking and behaviour, then perhaps you are not one. What did you think of what Seymour said a few posts ago about the sort of answers an INFP would likely give?

    Hanging around here listening to different types describe how they think has given me a clearer picture what Fi actually is, and I no longer think I have strong use of it. I used to get high Fi readings on those cognitive tests, but I no longer trust that they're a good measure of actual function use. Sometimes someone can relate to a "function use" statement for reasons that have nothing to do with the function it's supposed to measure. And they have the same problem as the typical tests: they rely on accurate self-perception.

    As for Vizzy, I don't see her as any sort of FP type. I'm thinking definitely introverted, and probably TP or FJ.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Silveresque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    If you'd "never know" you were INFP based on your current thinking and behaviour, then perhaps you are not one. What did you think of what Seymour said a few posts ago about the sort of answers an INFP would likely give?
    Well, I'm so much a mix of the two types that it's very hard to tell which one I'm more like. I suppose it's possible I could actually be an INTP, although I'm fairly certain I'm an INFP based on how I used to be as a child. I used to be much more emotional and temperamental, and I was somewhat prone to emotional outbursts. I'm pretty sure I started to develop my Ti in sixth grade, when I all of sudden went from failing math tests to getting A's without exerting more effort. Actually, that sounds more like Ne, but whether or not Ti was the cause or an effect of my success in math, that's definitely when it started, because that's when I started to like math and science and emphasize my analytical side.

    Anyways, let's look at what Seymour has said.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    When I was a kid, each toy and person had a very specific emotional "feel." That is, that particular toy or person would evoke a particular set of emotional and aesthetic responses when perceived. These kind of acted (for me) as an identifying signature for the thing or person when I thought about it.

    For example, imagine a favorite painting (or other work of art) from a museum you've enjoyed for years. You like it because it evokes a particular set of responses when you view it. Perhaps viewing it evokes a sense of tension or one of serenity. Perhaps it evokes a sense of balance or one of motion. Perhaps it evokes a sense of timelessness or ephemerality. Perhaps the subject matter or scene invokes sadness, happiness, loneliness, connectedness or whatever.

    Then, add to that the emotional elements surrounding your visits to the museum to visit it. Perhaps it also evokes a sense of viewing it as a child, or your love (or dislike) of trips to the museum, maybe a little guilt that you don't go to the museum more often, etc.

    Now, all those emotions and internal responses together create a kind of unique mix of feelings that are what the painting means to you on an aesthetic and emotional level. You never just experience just one feeling towards the painting (although certainly one feeling is likely to predominate at any moment)... the other feelings are always there, underneath or intermixed.

    So, as an adult I'm not as consciously aware of the "signature" of particular objects, although people still have a particular "feel" for me. And I remain aware of my emotions and perceptions shifting as I view and interact with the world around me. An unexpected or unexplained shift in emotion often works as a kind of alarm bell that something needs attention.
    I can sort of relate to this. I don't know if I've ever gone so far as to consciously attach emotional labels to objects, but I can understand the idea of objects arousing unique emotions. Actually, I think I do this all the time with words when I'm studying foreign languages. I always try not to just memorize the word and its translation, but to feel it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    And for an Fi-dom, I think it's difficult to simply ignore our emotional state without giving up a lot ability to perceive. Fi-doms try to harmonize their actions with their feelings and values. When dealing with upset, it's hard to perceive much else, so acting authentically with one's whole self becomes difficult at best. Also, the perceptions of the emotions of others becomes muddied when we are distracted by our own emotional upset.
    I can definitely relate to this. When I get really upset, I have to withdraw and try to work through my feelings. It definitely seems like an impairment when I'm in an emotional state, and sometimes I'm just not able to focus or function.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    INFPs are sometimes called "clarifying harmonizers," and—as much as that phrase makes me roll my eyes—there's some truth to it. I think we tend to want to build up a model of the other person's emotional perspective as a first step. There's a practical aspect to this, because advice that's out of sync with where another person is often can't be heard, much less followed. What's objectively and impersonally the simplest solution often doesn't matter if it's psychologically impossible (or requires far too much energy) for someone to understand and implement.
    I strongly relate to this as well. When someone else is really upset and I have something to say about it, I will always keep quiet unless I know that that person is able and willing to listen in their current emotional state.

  8. #18
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
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    My perspective certainly isn't the universally approved INFP one... so some of this may well just be me. For example, I'm pretty sure not every INFP is so hyper-aware of emotional state. Still, I think INFPs do work towards there being harmony between ideals, emotions and actions.

    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    I consider emotions important, but I usually don't make decisions based on emotion alone. My Fi realizes it isn't qualified to make reasonable decisions without first consulting Ti.
    I don't make mine based on emotions alone, but I admit that often what I feel and value on a "gut level" is the deciding factor (which is different from transitory emotion). Even so, I do try to validate things logically before deciding on a course of action.

    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages
    I don't really get it when INFPs talk about using their emotions as a guide or a perception tool.
    I'm not sure I understand that either, to be honest.
    Emotional responses can signal things that one may have missed on a conscious level. For example, if someone is trying to manipulate me often I will feel a sense of anger coming (seemingly) out of nowhere. When that happens, I take a step back and try to analyze where the anger is coming from.

    A metaphor I've used before is that it's a bit like going through one's day with a trusted pet... you know your pet and your know how it normally responds to things. If it's suddenly growling, or intently watching something, it's a clue for you to take a look, too. Your pet isn't rational, but it may pick up on things that you miss. When your pet gets upset, you have to attend to it before you can continue about your business.

    Emotions are a guide in another sense, too, since acting against one's principles causes emotional distress or a sense of queasiness... kind of in the same way that acting inauthentically does. So in that sense, they are a guide to keeping your actions in line with your beliefs.

    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages
    I often ask myself things like, Is this really true or do I just want it to be true? Am I dismissing possibility x because I fear or dread it? What if I've been assuming y just because it makes me feel better? I seem to get the most clarity that way, by being aware of my emotions or wishes but trying to reason as independently from them as I can.
    I can relate to this as well. I wonder if this might be a perceiving trait, or if it's specifically Ti analysis.
    I don't do a lot of that specific kind of second guessing... but no idea if that's just me.


    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    [...]

    I don't believe there has to be a focus on one or the other, since results and intent don't necessarily apply to the same type of thing. When you're judging results, you're deciding whether the choice was good or bad, and when you're judging intent, you're deciding whether the person was good or bad. For example, if someone has good intentions but the results are bad, that makes the choice bad, but not the person. At least, that's how I see it.
    That sounds totally fair. I think most people are willing to forgive a bit based on good intent. I think where the line falls can be influenced by type. I've heard NFJs express frustration at NFPs when they ignore commonly accepted wisdom and it ends poorly, even though the NFP meant well and each step seemed reasonable at the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    I'm an INFP, yet my answers are pretty much the same blankpages's answers. Either I'm wrong in my own typing or the line between INFP's and INTP's is quite thin. I seem to act and even think more like an INTP these days, and if I didn't think back to how I was as a child, I would probably never know I'm an INFP. Anyways, just figured it might be helpful to have an INFP perspective as well.
    I've certainly moved a lot in the "T" direction over time. Certainly training and experience modify things and (one hopes) moves one more towards balance over time.

    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    Well, I'm so much a mix of the two types that it's very hard to tell which one I'm more like. I suppose it's possible I could actually be an INTP, although I'm fairly certain I'm an INFP based on how I used to be as a child. I used to be much more emotional and temperamental, and I was somewhat prone to emotional outbursts. I'm pretty sure I started to develop my Ti in sixth grade, when I all of sudden went from failing math tests to getting A's without exerting more effort. Actually, that sounds more like Ne, but whether or not Ti was the cause or an effect of my success in math, that's definitely when it started, because that's when I started to like math and science and emphasize my analytical side.
    Again, I've certainly become much more balanced F/T-wise over time. Still, on some level I admit the Fi wins over all else for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by RevlisZero View Post
    I can sort of relate to this. I don't know if I've ever gone so far as to consciously attach emotional labels to objects, but I can understand the idea of objects arousing unique emotions. Actually, I think I do this all the time with words when I'm studying foreign languages. I always try not to just memorize the word and its translation, but to feel it.
    I don't think that, even as a child, I ever consciously assigned emotional labels to thing... just that my perception of each object and person had it's own feel... and that "signature" became more-or-less stable over time. The combination of feelings identified the "essence" of something on some level. I don't think every INFP experiences this to the same degree I did, though.

    Still, here's an exerpt from simulated world's INFP description:

    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld
    Fi users believe there is a definite moral order to the universe [...] and that the only way we may catch a glimpse of this sacred ideal is by allowing ourselves complete and total connection and understanding with our emotional responses and the way they reflect that which upholds the internal "essence" of moral goodness as we understand it subjectively and individually.
    So I think that connection with internal emotional essence and ideals is fairly typical of INFPs.

    EDIT: BTW, I don't necessarily thing there is an absolute system or morality, either.
    Last edited by Seymour; 08-06-2011 at 01:58 PM.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Silveresque's Avatar
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    This "moral essence" makes sense to me, but I'm not sure believe that there is any absolute system of morality. All feelings are valid, but different people may experience different emotional reactions to the same situation, so one person's Fi-based morality may differ from that of another.

    I found a quote from an older thread that I think is relevant to this thread, in case you're still not sure about your type, Vizzy. I think this really helps put things into perspective.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    One thing is that that INFPs tend to have an engaged kindness, while INTPs tend to have a detached kindness. Both can be kind and low-key, it's just that INTPs tend to intellectualize a relationship rather than engaging purely on the emotional level like INFPs can naturally do.

    I was talking to a close INFP friend last night and describing a situation where one of my children was in the hospital years ago, and how I just had no real template for what to do. I cared about my child, and I would be there with him in the hospital, but he was very young and thus could not "engage" and I had no idea what to say or how to interact or whatever, and even at times felt bored. It was hard for me to stay there all the time, despite caring as much as I did, my mind was unable to engage anything, and so I was at a loss. I was judged by people in my family for "not caring" about my child, but that is the furthest from the truth.

    My friend said when one of his children was in the hospital as a baby, he had no problems: He would sit there for hours, talking to his baby son, and engaging him emotionally even if there was no intellectual/articulated response back. He could do that, and he could totally understand why I couldn't... because I'm not him. What F ability I have came from growing up and living my life surrounded by F-style people and learning how to speak their language just so we could all get along, but it's not that instinctive for me.

    Both INTPs and INFPs care, but INTPs tend to need a more intellectual interface by which they try to "articulate" their caring, INFPs will more exude and show it rather than having to explain it and how it works.
    Uh oh. I think I might have actually mistyped myself...again...

    Anyways, I don't intend to make this thread about me. How do you relate to these examples? Are you still unsure about your type?

  10. #20
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Boy, it's weird to have someone post something I never even remember writing.

    I'm glad it was helpful though.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

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