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  1. #11
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dissonance View Post
    i think i agree with the description you just gave; i'm sure i use Se more than Ne. but i'm not that comfortable with any functions besides Ni, Fe, and Ti. other INFJs i know seem to have poor control of Se, just like me.

    i think i have better control over Ne and Fi than Se, but i certainly use Se more.

    that's my take. does that match Bebe's work?
    Good points Dissonance, which is why I am perplexed with the average INJ saying that they have little or no usage of Se, however describe activities that clearly show they are using it. I have always found that based on descriptions, I readily use Fe however come to realize that taking actions based on my Fi gets me into trouble. I also find Te totally foreign.
    Quote Originally Posted by dissonance View Post
    see, there's a difference between using a function a lot and having good control over it. with IxTPs for example, i notice Fe usage somewhat often, but the control seems to be poor. they probably have better control over Te, but they probably use it much less frequently than Fe.
    I agree that we do use all functions, but have little or no control over some. Naturally we will use our dominant and auxilary in most situations, yet certain functions are not appropriate for certain situations, and some situations calls for us to use certain functions. Lenore Thomson gives a great example in distinguishing Ti from Te. Te is too exacting when an activity calls for on the spot or spontaneous action (as most likely Fe). When grocery shopping, what use is Te in determining whether you have more room in your shopping cart. That takes being in the present and over time in grocery shopping, you become more and more comfortable in knowing how much to get in that basket. That is a clear use of Se. On the otherhand, attempting to build or construct something new, may call for reading, understanding and applying per instructions. In that case, Te will be necessary and someone who has a poor control over that function will find the task arduous.

  2. #12
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    I had higher hopes for the OP after reading the title. Are you a 4 letter symbol? No. MBTI doesn't try to gather who you are, it just collects a small sample of you, and makes predictions by recombining those samples. Then it pretends like this is some deep part of you, deeper than any of the other parts. There're deeper parts to your personality. And of course, that's only your personality. Is that really YOU, anyway? What about your body? Is there a you separate from your personality? All good questions. Finally, there's the problem of confusing a symbol for something with the thing itself -- a lot like going to the border and getting confused because there are no red dashed lines separating one territory from another. Yikes.

  3. #13
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arcticangel02 View Post
    Humans have a habit of oversimplifying things, categorising things. It makes things easier, sometimes, and other times harder.
    It's very much human nature for us to label something in order to give it concrete meaning, therein simplifying it's meaning. It also gives us control in order to then interpret that label based on our past perceptions, stereotypes and prejudices, and dissect.
    Quote Originally Posted by arcticangel02 View Post
    What I'm trying to say (in a horribly roundabout way) is that even really basic labels are subjective.

    You are what you are. We use labels to categorise ourselves, even though the labels are hardly sufficient to measure human personality. It is impossible to determine exactly what the same label would mean to everyone who was presented with it - everyone's experiences are different. A label helps to narrow things down so that you're in the right ballpark, at least.
    You did travel a bit didn't you.... OMG, my son is correct, he is most likely ENFP. He does the same thing.

    Artic you raise some very good points. I do question whether we are on the same page, as we gain more knowledge into any matter, including this topic. At some point we all settle on our understanding (some with a more limited understanding than others) of the topic, but that is where we stop being in the same park. Fortunately most of us acknowledge unspoken principles that keeps us on topic. In the end we all have differing points of view, and can appreciate certain sub-systems more or less than others. Now I am going to go back a read my inquiry. For some reason I feel off topic at this point.

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