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Thread: gromit an ISFP?

  1. #31
    Senior Member sculpting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    Well I have a strong Se and Fi (also Ne, so I thought, but maybe it is Ni...)

    Yes, it is really the Se that is throwing me for a loop. If I am actually an ENFP, then I have a very well-developed Se... I am enchanted by textures, flavors, beautiful objects (my sister calls them "nib nobs")... everything physical. Sometimes I experience something with one sense and then feel it in another sense as well. Like music as textures, numbers and letters with different emotions/colors, etc. I was climbing trees by the time I was three years old and played varsity sports through college, and I love just doing things like gardening, carpentry, painting, coloring, interpretive dancing (by myself - don't make fun)...
    I relate to the bolded very strongly. Patterns evoke very strong emotions in me-I am extremely drawn to textures, touching things, -feeling things. In stores I want to touch everything. Outdoors- Waves, clouds, furniture, rocks. Sounds silly, but I find the patterns compelling, enchanting. Music as textures-totally-I see music in my mind. Some numbers have colors as well. Yes, I dance alone or with toddler ...painting-but I like to do it with my hands-tactility.

    Lovers-I recall their taste/touch/smell-not how they look. textures.

    I's suggest you are seeing a weird effect here. Both ENXPs say they feel like they can tap into Se very strongly at times. Yet it's the 8th function-huh? I think if you push Ne hard enough-it wants to become "one" with the moment. It becomes "real time" in it's intensity. Jung mentioned something to this effect. I bet it differs between NeTi and NeFi though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jung View Post
    It is not the strongest sensation, in the physiological sense, that is accorded the chief value, but any sensation whose value is enhanced by the intuitive's unconscious attitude. In this way it may eventually come to acquire the chief value, and to his mind becomes pure sensation. But it is actually not so.
    This is why reason ENTPs are so awesome for me to party with. The last time I did this I ended up with locked hands, spinning in the street with my entp buddy. Then we danced in circles, faster and faster, then laid on the ground and watched the clouds drift by overhead. We both said it was our favorite thing to do ever. (Yeah on a street filled with bars and drunk college kids. I cherish this memory)

    Combined with Fi-that may be the textural/physical component. If Fi is meant to mirror the emotive states of others for our internal cross comparison via FiSi and allow us to analyze them-well maybe it can do that with very complex patterns as well. People are the most complex pattern there is. When I watch people, and allow my mind to open-ie not think-I am overwhelmed with intense input-just like when I watch the ocean.

    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    More information which might be or might not be relevant:

    I was always good in school and took to things like physics and math very easily. I studied engineering as an undergrad, and found I could keep up with the subject matter intellectually, but the details and the structure made me want to die or quit. I managed to graduate though, and with pretty good grades.
    Go team Tert Te! Biochem/neuroscience/physiology/immunology were cake walks. Abstract math and physics were do-able as well. I could NeTe my way through the physics subject matter-but would mess up the tiny details. No Ti... Thus I could not have been a physicist. I always wanted to build giant beautiful highway bridges-yeah they would have been death traps...

    Cant speak to ISFP though. I only know one ISFP girl and she likes to party a lot but can very sweet. At work she is very sparkly and cute, has been known to dance in five inch heels at bars, but she likes to go deer hunting, and has pics of herself with her first kill on her desk. I dunno..

  2. #32
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    Can you explain to me more about "intelligent role" (or at least point me in a direction that I can read about it more)?
    Sure.

    Wapedia - Wiki: Keirsey Temperament Sorter
    Personality Test - Keirsey Temperament Website

    And from right here on this forum: http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...breakdown.html

    The gist of it is that no temperament or type has a monopoly on intelligence. And a better definition of intelligence is knowing what best to do in any given situation or "role." Some people are naturally suited better for certain roles. It doesn't mean they can't do anything else, or that someone of a different type can't fill that same role, it just means there are varying levels of natural ability and tendency.

    For instance, my role is Composer. That doesn't mean I couldn't fill a role of Supervisor or Counselor, but if I did, it would require more effort on my part to get really good at that role, because I am less naturally suited for it. And likewise, a natural Supervisor would have to exert more effort to fill the role of Composer.

    So, in terms of figuring out your role, it's mainly just figuring out what you are most interested in, what drives you, what your basic motivations in life are, because that's what the temperament theory is based on, rather than speculation on internal processes. Contrary to what some people on this site have said about me, I do not think there is anything wrong with the internal process speculation, but like Keirsey, I don't agree with using it as the basis for type identification, because for most people it leads to more confusion than understanding.
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  3. #33
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    Cognitive Process Level of Development (Preference, Skill and Frequency of Use)
    extraverted Sensing (Se) ******************************* (31.5)
    good use
    introverted Sensing (Si) ************* (13.8)
    unused
    extraverted Intuiting (Ne) ***************************************** (41.3)
    excellent use
    introverted Intuiting (Ni) ************************************ (36.2)
    excellent use
    extraverted Thinking (Te) ***************** (17.9)
    limited use
    introverted Thinking (Ti) *************************** (27.3)
    average use
    extraverted Feeling (Fe) ***************************** (29.1)
    average use
    introverted Feeling (Fi) ******************************************* (43.5)
    excellent use

    Summary Analysis of Profile
    By focusing on the strongest configuration of cognitive processes, your pattern of responses most closely matches individuals of this type: INFP

    Lead (Dominant) Process
    Introverted Feeling (Fi): Staying true to who you really are. Paying close attention to your personal identity, values and beliefs. Checking with your conscience. Choosing behavior congruent with what is important to you.

    Support (Auxilliary) Process
    Extraverted Intuiting (Ne): Exploring the emerging patterns. Wondering about patterns of interaction across various situations. Checking what hypotheses and meanings fit best. Trusting what emerges as you shift a situation’s dynamics.

    If these cognitive processes don't fit well then consider these types: ENFP, or ISFP
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  4. #34
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    Jeffster, I guess it is difficult for me to know which roles I fill naturally anymore. Maybe I am having a bit of a minor identity crisis and so I'm trying to get to the "core" of myself, but it does seem that there are several roles I can do with ease...

    Quote Originally Posted by Orobas View Post
    It is not the strongest sensation, in the physiological sense, that is accorded the chief value, but any sensation whose value is enhanced by the intuitive's unconscious attitude. In this way it may eventually come to acquire the chief value, and to his mind becomes pure sensation. But it is actually not so.
    Why is it not actually so? What is it actually?

    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    gromit,

    One thing that I find ever so useful is to look at a type's negative traits. As we all grow and mature, we either develop lesser functions (or depending on your perspective, learn to use our main functions to mimic those other functions), and so all the "good features" of an individual don't seem to belong to any one type. However, our weak spots tend to be fairly specific, and since we focus on correcting those, we can remember that they were our weak spots before we learned to deal with them.

    Use the weak spots you currently have or remember having overcome, and use those to figure out what type you are based on the weak spots of ISFP and ENFP.

    Either way, remember that you're a really cool person whatever type you are. It's about discovering yourself, not about "being correct."
    I began writing up something before the site maintenance about all the 'weaknesses' that I've worked on through the years, but then it sort of became a treatise, and I'm not sure anyone would be interested in reading it... I'll try to go through and summarize and pick out some key points.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  5. #35
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    Cognitive Process Level of Development (Preference, Skill and Frequency of Use)
    extraverted Sensing (Se) ******************************* (31.5)
    good use
    introverted Sensing (Si) ************* (13.8)
    unused
    extraverted Intuiting (Ne) ***************************************** (41.3)
    excellent use
    introverted Intuiting (Ni) ************************************ (36.2)
    excellent use
    extraverted Thinking (Te) ***************** (17.9)
    limited use
    introverted Thinking (Ti) *************************** (27.3)
    average use
    extraverted Feeling (Fe) ***************************** (29.1)
    average use
    introverted Feeling (Fi) ******************************************* (43.5)
    excellent use

    Summary Analysis of Profile
    By focusing on the strongest configuration of cognitive processes, your pattern of responses most closely matches individuals of this type: INFP

    Lead (Dominant) Process
    Introverted Feeling (Fi): Staying true to who you really are. Paying close attention to your personal identity, values and beliefs. Checking with your conscience. Choosing behavior congruent with what is important to you.

    Support (Auxilliary) Process
    Extraverted Intuiting (Ne): Exploring the emerging patterns. Wondering about patterns of interaction across various situations. Checking what hypotheses and meanings fit best. Trusting what emerges as you shift a situation’s dynamics.

    If these cognitive processes don't fit well then consider these types: ENFP, or ISFP
    By this test's measure, that's a "barely INFP" result. One answer slightly differently would give you ENFP, no problem.

    I don't find this test to be that useful, but it is an interesting test to take, especially for those new to the functions and wanting to get an idea of what they are. However, I suspect it measures some apples against some oranges, so the relative strengths can be rather random.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  6. #36
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    Maybe I will just post it all... since it's my thread anyway.

    Childhood
    When I was a child, I was mostly indifferent to other people's feelings or maybe even other people in general. My parents nicknamed me 'porcupine' because I was a little bit prickly (esp. compared to my younger sister who was such a cuddle-bug). I wanted attention/praise, and I wanted people to do what I told them to do or to entertain me. That was the extent of human interaction for me, I'm a little ashamed to say. I liked inventing (I apparently attached an umbrella to my tricycle so that I could ride it around in the rain) and took apart toys and electric fans and stuff like that, to my parents' dismay. I took to words and reading and writing stories and rhymes. I also liked imagining I was some kind of medicine woman, in the woods, who knew remedies and could heal people. I would chop up leaves and stir oak pollen in with water and wrap things in dried ferns, in a very ritualistic manner, as though the components had some sort of inherent spiritual/mystical properties.

    I look at pictures of myself from my early childhood and it is startling. Especially the eyes. Serious, deep eyes, like old eyes on a little child. But not very compassionate at all. Strange.

    I remember at about age ten or eleven this small transformation occurred. First aspect of this transformation that I recall: this girl Maria in my fifth grade class was really good at math. She advanced through all the levels of the timed tests they use to drill the memorization into kids' heads (I had previously not really cared that much about them, it wasn't very interesting, and it never occurred to me to really try at it). I saw that she could do it and asked myself why I didn't do it. So I worked at it and caught up with her and then we both were top in math for the classroom. It changed how I perceived myself in some fundamental way. Second aspect: I began to really care about human interaction in a very different manner than I ever had. I remember realizing that other people had OPINIONS about me, and feeling baffled and sort of resenting it a little bit.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  7. #37
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    Adolescence
    I became pretty quiet. I did not talk to anyone about anything I was feeling. At least not until high school, when this INTJ friend moved into my town. She is the first person I ever felt like could understand me, and the first person I ever trusted to share my crazy ideas and feelings with. I did not realize that such human connections were possible before that point. I did not feel that way with my parents or any of my siblings (I have 5) or other friends or classmates or any other adults. It was surprising and a little bit bewildering to me, and I learned a lot through that friendship.

    Throughout middle school academically I found all the memorization to be so tedious. I would understand a concept and then be so tired of it by the time the quiz or test arrived and I would space out a lot or forget about assignments or get really frustrated with my teachers or with school in general. Like they weren't focusing on WHAT WAS IMPORTANT i.e. the idea that surrounded all the little facts or procedures. That is probably the time I was LEAST in touch with Se (probably makes sense... adolescence = physically awkward for most people).

    By the time I got to high school I had come to accept that, yes, people had opinions of me but that I wanted to care more about my own opinion of myself and my own vision of the world. I was bright, personable, spontaneous, spunky, athletic, a little bit of a nerd, but got along with most people pretty easily. People liked me because I was a free spirit. I yearned for my little high school community to not be so concerned with roles/fitting in, and tried to disrupt the routine in small, beautiful, delightful ways. I just wanted everybody to share in joy and spontaneity. I was generally well-liked but still felt like I did not fit in. I am not sure I would have thought I had any weaknesses at that point in my life. Probably I would have thought the weaknesses were with other people, or problems with "the system." No... I guess I began to realize on some level that details and precision were important, and would get a little frustrated with myself, but mostly still with the system. I also definitely began to take issue with the way that a lot of people in my religion framed things, like they were focusing too much on "the rules" and not enough on "the greatest commandment" (i.e. love). I also became fascinated with symbolic meaning to refer to spiritual/emotional concepts.

    Another moment of transformation came at 16 or 17, when I realized that I could see things from another person's perspective, realized that you could take on a different perspective temporarily, see things through another lens. It sort of blew my mind. When I entered high school, I also joined sports teams - I had regained control of motor skills... ha ha ha. So after a couple years of team sports, at the same time as developing the ability to shift perspectives, my understanding of sports (field hockey and other field games) suddenly deepened. I was able to play in a much more... intelligent way. I began to be able to understood the field as a system and ways that I could interact with the system to bring about a desired result. Not necessarily on a conscious level, but on an instinctual level. It certainly felt like a tremendous cognitive shift.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  8. #38
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    College/University
    I began to really come to see that the issue with details/precision/routine/following through were sort of my own problems, not only problems with "the system," but things I would need to learn to deal with if I ever wanted to do anything with myself/my life. It caused me to doubt myself a lot...

    I studied architecture for 2 years. I loved the creativity, I loved doing materials studies, using space, light, form, to influence moods, behaviors. And I loved the philosophy/theory behind a lot of it too. Professors adored the things I would come up with... the textures, the spatial concepts... at least in the brainstorming stage. I really struggled with making any of it into a final project. I became frustrated with myself at never being able to bring the ideas into full fruition. I became tired/overwhelmed by the open-ended feeling, that the design could always be improved upon, that there was no such thing as "done," in my mind, and I became frustrated with having to turn my ideas into plans and sections and actual realities. I alternated between feeling like something would be lost and that I was defective at the last stage of the design process.

    Anyway, to the surprise of a lot of people, including myself, I switched to engineering and finished up the degree, graduated, got a job, and now here I am.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  9. #39
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    Ha ha ha ha... this feels so extravagant.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  10. #40
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    Adult
    After college is when I would say I have learned the MOST about myself and life in general. I still have had those issues with feeling somewhat defective, but now I have begun to realize that it's not about being defective, it's just that I have traits, which manifest themselves in constructive and destructive ways. Lessons processes of learning since graduation (almost 3 years now), sort of in chronological order, although there's significant overlap:

    • Understanding emotional implications of different people's perspectives
    • Approaching different emotional realities with openness/compassion
    • Almost excessive focus on self-improvement
    • Realizing I must love myself, as I am in addition to how I COULD BE
    • Accepting that I am not defective, spiritually... this one has been huge. I have decided to maintain the faith tradition of my childhood, even though I feel like I understand a lot of concepts a lot differently (i.e. less literally) from most other people in the community. I have come to the realization that we just speak different "faith languages" and instead of letting myself feel alienated by that, just teaching myself to translate it in my mind, relate it to the ideas that I understand, which relates to the next "lesson"...
    • Integrating all of my moral/philosophical/spiritual ideas into a holistic system... it makes sense inside of me, but when I tried to articulate it all through an email correspondence with a friend recently, but it was really frustrating... it is just too deep/wide, but little bits can crop up into conversation here and there (I am imagining this is me developing/starting to master Fi, which might also be why that is coming out as my primary cognitive function at this point in my life)
    • Accepting I am not defective, psychologically. I have different gifts than a lot of engineers, and I need to find ways to make those into professional strengths
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

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