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Thread: Type me!

  1. #291
    Senior Member Chloe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Every NT I know says no way with NTJ. GAHHHH!!!
    i guess ESTJs would accept you?

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  3. #293
    Senior Member Chloe's Avatar
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    I like this theory about weird Enneagram and MBTI combinations

    (not that i say you have one, if you're E1 and TJ, it's good combo.)

    but maybe something similar is reason for your confusion

    'Paula' is an ENFP, but is typed by Wyman as an Enneagram 'One', which we have characterized as a strong 'J' type that statistically appears to have a greater concentration of ISTJs (the exact opposite of the ENFP) than any other Enneagram type. 'Korey' is an ESFP, but is typed by Wyman as an Enneagram Eight (to Michael Huber's consternation, I might add). Indeed, Wyman herself, an INFJ, self-identifies as an Enneagram 'Three' (which, according to Pat and I, is best characterized by the ESTP - the diametrical opposite of the INFJ!).

    Wyman seems not to be unaware of the fact that these cases, including her own, appear to express a conflict of some sort. About her client, 'Paula', Wyman says:


    The qualities of an ENFP are rather different from that of the Enneagram One. The ENFP is a free spirit, creative, spontaneous, insightful, disorganized, dramatic, fun-loving, imaginative, non-conforming and definitely not neat. Paula recognized that part of herself almost like someone from her distant past. The ENFP certainly had not been fully present in her life for as long as she could remember. The qualities of the One and the ENFP were at war with each other within her with the One winning hands down.

  4. #294
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    ENXJ fits more, both in terms of the first article and the second article. The second article is quite telling. The third confuses me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chloee View Post
    I like this theory about weird Enneagram and MBTI combinations

    (not that i say you have one, if you're E1 and TJ, it's good combo.)

    but maybe something similar is reason for your confusion
    Another possibility, true.
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  5. #295
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    Linguistics is not taught until the third or fourth year of college, and then only to majors. The highest level of literary analysis and comparitive literature (between languages) is only taught at post-graduate level.
    I think that you are going off topic now. The academic matters regarding Linguistics are profoundly different from the language notions we have been discussing. We have been discussing the study of grammar and how easily a person can learn to communicate with formidable grammar. We have also discussed poetry and novel writing.

    The work that Linguists do is scientific in nature and highly systematic. They make abstract theoretical models and endeavor to test them out by empirical means. Their work is a cross between Psychology and Philosophy, it truly has little to do with grammar, writing poetry or writing novels. Being a good poet or novelist, or writing with impeccable grammar will not make you a good linguist. To be a good linguist, you need to be a careful and a systematic thinker. Hence, a mathematician is more likely to excell at linguistics than a novelist.

    With regard to literary analysis, that too has little to do with writing novels and poetry. You'd need one skill to write a heart-moving poem and a whole another skillset to be able to analyze the poem and explain exactly what the author may be talking about. Analysis of literature is systematic in nature, yet writing poetry and novels is intuitive.






    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    Lots of people fail miserably at literary analysis, though. Still more are bad story tellers, as evidenced by dime-store novels and B movies. To postulate that people who excel at linguistics and writing are riding on instinct is preposterous. .
    You're absolutely right, people who excell at linguistics and literary analysis have excellent analytical abilities. People who excel at writing poetry and novels are indeed riding on instincts. This does not mean that they do not think analytically at all, but merely that they rely on intuitive thought much more than they rely on analytical thought.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

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  6. #296
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Agreed.

    If my Fe wasn't so god-awful I'd say ENFJ....but no way. Even Pinky said no way thousands of times...INFJ doesn't make sense. Every NT I know says no way with NTJ. GAHHHH!!!
    I've been saying you're NTJ. Do I not count?
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  7. #297
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elaur View Post
    Stay in your boxes!!!!!!!!! There are rules to be followed here!
    for realz!!!!

    did it ever occur to you that it's healthier to not be an archetypal type? perhaps you're just a well rounded person that can adapt to whatever situation you're thrown into.

  8. #298
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jen View Post
    for realz!!!!

    did it ever occur to you that it's healthier to not be an archetypal type? perhaps you're just a well rounded person that can adapt to whatever situation you're thrown into.


    Little Linguist, I don't have an opinion. I sometimes/often think mbti in essence IS about the stereotypes, and reading into it further can become counterproductive - 'Which Stereotype Fits You Best?', and which stereotype would others place you in - and although some people fit the archetype/type descriptions to a T, the majority of people don't, which is why a lot of people don't easily identify with one and only one type. After all, it's not like we're genetically born with an E vs. I gene, N vs. S gene, etc etc, we simply have personality preferences/'comfort zones' that can be categorized in various ways, when comparing ourselves to others who hold the same general traits or who are quite opposed to our natural inclinations. It's simply a categorical system, and as such, you just throw yourself into which ever one makes the most sense (knowing you're still going to have your own idiosyncracies/developed skills that you aren't 'supposed' to have as that type), and there you have it.
    "...On and on and on and on he strode, far out over the sands, singing wildly to the sea, crying to greet the advent of the life that had cried to him." - James Joyce

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  9. #299
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chloee View Post
    i guess ESTJs would accept you?
    Not quite sure, actually. Probably not? I wonder if anyone would?

    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryWalker View Post
    I think that you are going off topic now. The academic matters regarding Linguistics are profoundly different from the language notions we have been discussing. We have been discussing the study of grammar and how easily a person can learn to communicate with formidable grammar. We have also discussed poetry and novel writing.

    The work that Linguists do is scientific in nature and highly systematic. They make abstract theoretical models and endeavor to test them out by empirical means. Their work is a cross between Psychology and Philosophy, it truly has little to do with grammar, writing poetry or writing novels. Being a good poet or novelist, or writing with impeccable grammar will not make you a good linguist. To be a good linguist, you need to be a careful and a systematic thinker. Hence, a mathematician is more likely to excell at linguistics than a novelist.

    With regard to literary analysis, that too has little to do with writing novels and poetry. You'd need one skill to write a heart-moving poem and a whole another skillset to be able to analyze the poem and explain exactly what the author may be talking about. Analysis of literature is systematic in nature, yet writing poetry and novels is intuitive.

    You're absolutely right, people who excell at linguistics and literary analysis have excellent analytical abilities. People who excel at writing poetry and novels are indeed riding on instincts. This does not mean that they do not think analytically at all, but merely that they rely on intuitive thought much more than they rely on analytical thought.
    I know one thing: I will never be a good author because everything I write (fiction, etc.) sounds like some kind of academic work - too structured and unnatural in the telling. If you need good grammar or flow, give me your work, but if you need a good editor for a children's story, forget it.

    Sadly, I'm not quite sure that is relevant, but I want to clarify that I've always been miserable at creative writing, to my dismay.

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    I've been saying you're NTJ. Do I not count?
    I'm sorry Liquid, of course you did, and yes, you do count! Ygolo also mentioned the possibility that I might be xNTJ. So did INTJMom (INTJ). *thinking* Oh, yes, Babylon Candle said I might be, too, or ENFJ. *thinking again* Well, if I forgot any of you NTs who said I was NTJ, it's not deliberate; I'm just a forgetful person.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jen View Post
    for realz!!!!

    did it ever occur to you that it's healthier to not be an archetypal type? perhaps you're just a well rounded person that can adapt to whatever situation you're thrown into.
    You know what? You may be onto something there. It just bothers me that I don't seem to 'fit right' and have a type like everyone else. My husband tells me, "That's because you're not like everyone else. I have never met anyone quite like you before. There are very few people with your combination of traits." I guess that's what fascinates him (INTP) so much: That I'm so...well...strange. He's also a bit strange. Both his Ti and Fi are off the charts, followed by extremely strong Ne. He's your INtP.
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  10. #300
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cascadeco View Post


    Little Linguist, I don't have an opinion. I sometimes/often think mbti in essence IS about the stereotypes, and reading into it further can become counterproductive - 'Which Stereotype Fits You Best?', and which stereotype would others place you in - and although some people fit the archetype/type descriptions to a T, the majority of people don't, which is why a lot of people don't easily identify with one and only one type. After all, it's not like we're genetically born with an E vs. I gene, N vs. S gene, etc etc, we simply have personality preferences/'comfort zones' that can be categorized in various ways, when comparing ourselves to others who hold the same general traits or who are quite opposed to our natural inclinations. It's simply a categorical system, and as such, you just throw yourself into which ever one makes the most sense (knowing you're still going to have your own idiosyncracies/developed skills that you aren't 'supposed' to have as that type), and there you have it.
    You're so right. I wish I could solve this and get it over with. I have the 17th type along with Babylon Candle, who seems to be having the exact same dilemma as me right now. (YAY for someone who is like me! Wait, do I want to wish that on anyone?)
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

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