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Thread: Type me!

  1. #111
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Maybe typing myself as a child will help clarify matters. I've bolded the important stuff for people who cannot pay attention that long.

    1. School: Up to the age of 8, I did not pay much attention. Of course, I followed the rules as long as they made sense, and I did not want to catch hell at home. I kind of chit-chatted with one or two friends.

    After the age of 8, I saw school as a huge mental competition with others: Social interaction did not interest me. I wanted to see who was the most capable, and I put my best effort into getting the highest grades possible, which generally came naturally to me with the exception of math, which was always my nemesis. (I HATE MATH!)
    Ha. I can relate to saying that I hated math. I can't at all relate to placing mental competition with peers over actually getting to know them as individuals though. I wanted to know everyone.


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    With regard to learning, I was very structured. I did my homework every night (with little intermissions to act crazy and rejuvenate) and basically handed in my homework assignments on time.
    Can't relate. If you had to pick between being out with friends and doing your homework, what would you have decided upon?


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    However, I was often absent-minded and forgot my homework at home. (GAHHH!) In addition, I would forget to bring in signed report cards, permission slips, reports, etc. I did not want to upset anyone. I just forgot it.
    I can completely relate to this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Whenever we had tests, I was annoying and always asked, "What did you get? What did you get?" Of course, I pretended but the real reason was that I wanted to know if I had the best mark, and if I did not, I would berate myself and force myself to study harder next time. The one exception: MATH. Although I was unhappy that I hovered around the B/C range, I knew there was no point in investing more time. If I did not get the highest grade in LANGUAGES, I would berate myself til the cows came home.
    Very academically competitive. Again, I can't relate at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    2. People/expression: Until the age of 8, I had 2-4 friends I always hung out with. After that, I became a hermit until the age of 20 or so. Weird.
    How were you with people outside of your core group? Why a hermit? What did you do to entertain yourself during your hermit years?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Anyway, I was extremely nervous and shy around others. In class, I hardly spoke above a whisper in high school. Often my teachers got annoyed and asked me to speak louder. It was kind of weird, but I was so afraid of making a mistake that I only wanted the teacher and I to hear it if I did. Usually I was right, though, which was the ironic thing.
    Can't relate at all, except that I am shy as well, but only upon first meeting people, in large groups, or when I'm the center of attention. Under the age of 13, I was always in trouble for speaking out of turn, talking to my friends when we were supposed to be paying attention, etc...


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    The one exception: Debates. During debates about things I enjoyed, I became loud and passionate, which would shock the HELL out of my teachers and classmates. It was as if they thought, "Holy crap, she does have a voice." Some were so shocked that they came and told me so afterwards, although these same people usually pretended that I did not exist. I would research a great deal, prepare myself with copious notes, went over them in my head, and destroyed the opposition. I loved taking the side that had the least support because it held the greatest challenge, and allowed me to sort of take control.
    Again, competitive for the sake of creating a mental challenge. I liked to take the underdog position in S&D too, but only because I was deeply interested in representing people who seemed to have little voice in society. I abhorred most intellectual competitiveness as a child, unless, everyone was in agreement that we were indeed participating in a competition.


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Great example: Debate Gore v. Perot 1993 (or 1994, something like that) about NAFTA. 95% of the class was in favor of Gore. I was not - only I and one other student. So we were a powerhouse, as the other person was also very bright. We shook the other side to its foundations and in the space of 20 minutes convinced 2 others that we were right!!!
    Was your primary concern being right and winning, or exposing what you saw to be the important issues and helping people to understand your passion and concern?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Other exception: Public speaking/acting. When I was prepared and spoke publicly, I did so with a great deal of passion and enthusiasm. It also shocked people, as this was not my normal tendency. Lectoring, drama, etc. were very interesting for me as an outlet for expression.
    What types of things did you lecture about?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Family: Get-togethers. Ewww. A bunch of adults talking about lots of stuff, and I'm the only child. So they look at you as a child. I hate that. So I had to adapt into an adult in my expression so that people would take me seriously. It shocked my peers that I had such a command of language and vocabulary.
    I can relate to being an only child! I loved getting in adult conversations though, so I can't relate to hating the experience of adaptation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    While interacting with some people in a teenage group at the age of 12, I confided that I felt like an 'alien', and that I could not relate to anyone, and I would really like people to explain WHY that is. Some older teenagers said, "Well, you're weird. You're, like, really smart, and you use vocabulary we do not understand. And you're 12. It's just....weird....You don't do anything normal kids and teenagers like, so there's nothing in common to talk to you about. You don't like dating. You don't like clothes. You don't like cars. You don't watch TV, listen to real music, or watch movies. You just read weird books, knit, and talk about weird stuff. It's like you're 80 or something - like you come from another time. And then, whenever you realize that, you get haughty and arrogant, and you're just not approachable." I never forgot that. It made me feel strange and ashamed.
    Wow, that hurt. Some of that could be related to upbringing, I'm sure. Only children usually mature faster, so that could be another part of it.

    How well do you adapt in various social environments and with different types of people now?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    3. Dating: I did not have anything to do with guys until I was 20 years old. I had no interest, and I did not want to be 'distracted from more important things.' I was cold, off-putting, and flat-out rejected guys who asked me out, even if I was attracted to them. I never admitted it if I was attracted to someone because that would be admitting weakness. Many people thought I was asexual during my pre-teen and teenage years, although I had a bunch of passion boiling inside, I kept it under tight control. My first kiss was at 19 or 20, so you can imagine I did not do anything else in that direction either.
    I can only relate to denying feelings for someone, and I did that twice. Vulnerability avoidance, yes.


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    4. Values: Since I grew up in a lower-middle class, strict Irish Roman Catholic family comprising of my grandparents (EXFJ and XNTP) and my aunt (INFP) and no siblings, I was raised with STRICT RELIGIOUS values. I was pretty much the only one of my generation in the family. My grandmother drilled me on how to react to people who screwed around with my values, to which I rolled my eyes at the time. My grandfather usually came up with crude phrases like, "Don't let a man use you as his garbage can," to which I would respond, "Ewwww!" If I swore, I was dead. So I did not swear AT ALL until I was around 20 or so. In fact, one dude asked me, "Would you swear if I gave you a dollar," to which I looked haughty, held my head up high, and said, "What do you hold me for, anyway??? There are more important things than money," to which he responded, "Eh, what about 10?" I got up indignantly and went away. I hated people who went to a CATHOLIC school and did not even know how church went "Dumb asses." or did not know the hymns "Idiots!"

    Another thing I couldn't stand was an idiot. People who did not remember what we did from one class to another confounded me. People who could not make connections between classes and subjects confounded me as well.

    On the other hand, I had a great deal of understanding for people who wanted to get it but couldn't. I often chocked that up to bad teaching and helped anyone who genuinely wanted to learn. But first I always asked, "Do you WANT to do this? We will have to invest a lot of time and effort, so I am happy to work with you if you WANT this. If not, there is no point." (Not always so direct, but you get the point).
    I have no clue what your type is, but I had fun reading about your childhood though. Fun stuff!
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  2. #112
    That chalkboard guy Matthew_Z's Avatar
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    ENFP in what some MBTI practitioners have described as "tertiary temptation." LL, you have some Te and I won't disagree with that. However, the role of Te plays for you isn't similar to the role it would play in a TJ. It's my impression that you use Te almost solely for organizing. From your experiences of group work, you don't seem to apt at delegating work. For you, Te is a "make myself organized" function, not a "make the world around me more efficient" function.

    On several occasions, you've admitted to not fully understanding what Ne is or how it works in a person. This bit of uncertainty on functions, combined with a driving Ne desire for alternative explanations adequately explains your nonacceptance of ENFP as a typing. The tertiary Te further comes in and cites a lack of evidence for the conclusion. (not fitting models well, not satisfied with an explanation over how an extravert could be so quiet, etc.) As with all Dominant-Tertiary function combinations, this forms a loop, rather than Ne-Fi which would extrapolate on "who you really are."
    If a deaf INFP falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

  3. #113
    Senior Member Space_Oddity's Avatar
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    ^
    ^
    EnFpFer, the fact that you can't relate to many things she wrote doesn't mean that she's not ENFP. It just means that she is not you.

  4. #114
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Space_Oddity View Post
    ^
    ^
    EnFpFer, the fact that you can't relate to many things she wrote doesn't mean that she's not ENFP. It just means that she is not you.
    Haha. You don't say? I don't even know if I'm an ENFP myself.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  5. #115
    Senior Member Space_Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnFpFer View Post
    Haha. You don't say? I don't even know if I'm an ENFP myself.
    Well, and that's it - that's when the confusion often begins.

  6. #116
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Space_Oddity View Post
    Well, and that's it - that's when the confusion often begins.
    I actually think the confusion begins with the published type descriptions and the stereotypes that follow, but it's always good to compare notes.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  7. #117
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Please allow me to address all your poitns, EnFpFer,



    Ha. I can relate to saying that I hated math. I can't at all relate to placing mental competition with peers over actually getting to know them as individuals though. I wanted to know everyone.
    No, I really hated math. Really. I struggled, and I did not like it at all.

    Yes, I really did mentally compete with everyone. I'm not proud of it now; I think I wasted a good opportunity to get to know people. However, I always had an impending sense that if I did not succeed, I would not get along in life, and I really had a drive to get ahead of the game.


    If you had to pick between being out with friends and doing your homework, what would you have decided upon?
    Homework. Then friends, if I had time.

    How were you with people outside of your core group? Why a hermit? What did you do to entertain yourself during your hermit years?
    I was very quiet and shy to the point where I do not even know if I had a core group because I was so completely different from everyone in high school. The fact that I was so driven and not focused on people did not help, however. I took things way too seriously.

    When alone, I would have a fantasy world, where I would entertain myself and have imaginary friends. I also read a lot, or would act in my room, pretending there were others there, stuff like that.

    Can't relate at all, except that I am shy as well, but only upon first meeting people, in large groups, or when I'm the center of attention. Under the age of 13, I was always in trouble for speaking out of turn, talking to my friends when we were supposed to be paying attention, etc...
    I can relate to that only when I was REALLY little. Otherwise, I was very focused. Too focused, really.


    Again, competitive for the sake of creating a mental challenge. I liked to take the underdog position in S&D too, but only because I was deeply interested in representing people who seemed to have little voice in society. I abhorred most intellectual competitiveness as a child, unless, everyone was in agreement that we were indeed participating in a competition.
    Oh, no, intellectual competitiveness was my main drive; it took a back seat when I felt 'sorry' for someone. But then it took a complete back seat. Most people cannot understand this, but when I feel compassion for someone, my Fi breaks my Ne-Te loop.


    Was your primary concern being right and winning, or exposing what you saw to be the important issues and helping people to understand your passion and concern?
    Yes, I wanted to be right and win. However, when I knew someone was struggling and wanted to succeed, I helped them to do so.

    What types of things did you lecture about?
    I debated political and ethical issues, usually in a very conservative manner. I read readings at church. I did poetry reading contests. I acted in plays.

    I can relate to being an only child! I loved getting in adult conversations though, so I can't relate to hating the experience of adaptation.
    Let me explain: The adaptation was not the problem. The problem was that everyone looked on me as a child BEFORE I adapted.

    Wow, that hurt. Some of that could be related to upbringing, I'm sure. Only children usually mature faster, so that could be another part of it.
    That could very well be.

    How well do you adapt in various social environments and with different types of people now?
    Muchhhhhhhhhh muchhhhhhhhh better, although I still struggle depending on the situation. I have to feel comfy.

    I
    can only relate to denying feelings for someone, and I did that twice. Vulnerability avoidance, yes.
    Exactly.

    I have no clue what your type is, but I had fun reading about your childhood though. Fun stuff!
    Thank you, I appreciated your heart-felt response - it is interesting to see how other people relate to the world. I wish I had been more like you as a child - it would have made life a great deal more interesting, I am sure.
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  8. #118
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    From what I understand, T/F is actually the last preference to form, so I'm not sure how examining your childhood will be terribly helpful in that regard.

    To me you sound like an INFJ.

  9. #119
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew_Z View Post
    ENFP in what some MBTI practitioners have described as "tertiary temptation." LL, you have some Te and I won't disagree with that. However, the role of Te plays for you isn't similar to the role it would play in a TJ. It's my impression that you use Te almost solely for organizing. From your experiences of group work, you don't seem to apt at delegating work. For you, Te is a "make myself organized" function, not a "make the world around me more efficient" function.

    On several occasions, you've admitted to not fully understanding what Ne is or how it works in a person. This bit of uncertainty on functions, combined with a driving Ne desire for alternative explanations adequately explains your nonacceptance of ENFP as a typing. The tertiary Te further comes in and cites a lack of evidence for the conclusion. (not fitting models well, not satisfied with an explanation over how an extravert could be so quiet, etc.) As with all Dominant-Tertiary function combinations, this forms a loop, rather than Ne-Fi which would extrapolate on "who you really are."
    Good point. I think I am only starting to learn to rely more on my Fi. For a long time, I felt the need for this Ne-Te loop, but now it's frustrating me because it's making me go in circles. It used to be efficient in academia - searching for options, connections, and bridges; organizing myself and processing data, being logical, etc. Although my Fi was always strong, I do not think I have used it enough, leading me to question myself and 'what I really am/want/need.' Since I have developed it more, I have become a healthier, more stable person.
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  10. #120
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Space_Oddity View Post
    ^
    ^
    EnFpFer, the fact that you can't relate to many things she wrote doesn't mean that she's not ENFP. It just means that she is not you.
    Quote Originally Posted by EnFpFer View Post
    Haha. You don't say? I don't even know if I'm an ENFP myself.
    Quote Originally Posted by Space_Oddity View Post
    Well, and that's it - that's when the confusion often begins.
    Quote Originally Posted by EnFpFer View Post
    I actually think the confusion begins with the published type descriptions and the stereotypes that follow, but it's always good to compare notes.
    Since there are 6 billion people in the world and only 16 personality types, there is bound to be some differentiation among the different types.

    EnFpFer might very well be a healthier and more stable ENFP than I am. She has developed Ne/Fi early; whereas I relied on an unnatural combination Ne/Te, which stifled my earlier development, perhaps.

    Now that I am developing my F side, I really have grown quite a bit. Now I even show more Fe than Fi sometimes, which is really weird, and is proven by my cognitive functions:

    Ne > Te > Fe > Se
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

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