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  1. #1
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Default Personality Junkie "The 16 Personality Types" and "INTP"

    http://personalityjunkie.com/16-personality-types-book
    http://personalityjunkie.com/intp-bo...-truth-meaning
    (Author, A.J. Drenth)

    Just finished these two not too long ago, and they are pretty good. Haven't had much time to compile points for a more full review, but the INTP book, for example, showed me some things I could identify with, but hadn't really thought of before. Like how in relationships, "If we think a bit outside the box, we might view INTP relationships as having little, if anything, to do with love (at least in the traditional sense), and more to do with mutual exploration, sharing, struggling, and learning."
    I now realize this is part of why I craved a serious relationship, but then once I got one, I wasn't into the more "lovey dovey" aspects of it.

    Then, other descriptions such as "Generally speaking, Ti (along with Ne) finds it easier to identify
    inconsistencies or logical shortcomings—to assert what is not true—than to identify and confidently assert what is true."

    Each type's "function stack" consists of "the first four" only. (I once asked him about "the other four", and he acknowledged they were "shadows", but he doesn't go into them).

    He assigns his own "roles" for them:

    Dominant Function: “The Captain.” The signature strength of the personality type.
    Auxiliary Function: “The Helpful Sidekick.” The chief assistant to the dominant function.
    Tertiary Function: “The Adolescent.” Relatively unconscious and undifferentiated.
    Inferior Function: “The Child.” The least differentiated and conscious of the four functions.

    In his descriptions of each type's "development", he'll describe the first stage as dealing with the dominant, of course, but then the second stage will go into the inferior, which begins a "tug of war" with the dominant. Then, he'll mention the auxiliary, which "is more like a natural sidekick to the dominant than a rival or opponent", and then that the type may open up and further refine their auxiliary judgment or perception through the tertiary.

    Phase III is "Integration", where we "are more aware of the tricks and temptations of the inferior function and the foolishness of indulging it". We learn that "integrating the inferior function must somehow occur through the dominant (as well as through the other functions in the functional stack). What this means, in essence, is that integrating the less conscious functions occurs in a more indirect and passive fashion, rather than by directly indulging or attempting to develop them".

    So,
    N types: Integrate S through consistent & healthy use of N
    S types: Integrate N through consistent & healthy use of S
    T types: Integrate F through consistent & healthy use of T
    F types: Integrate T through consistent & healthy use of F

    He also goes into J/P and the EJ, IJ, EP, IP groups in the intro. He puts a big focus on the fact that IP's are actually dominant "judgers", and IJ's are dominant "perceivers", so he tends to treat them in a reverse J/P fashion (like Socionics), and thus having a lot in common with the E types with the opposite J/P (dominant function with opposite attitude).

    Each type profile will describe the three stages of development, and then describe each of the four functions.

    One question mark is sometimes treating e functions in terms of behaviors (which we all do, as it's hard to describe them otherwise). Like Se is associated with "novel physical pleasures, lavish surroundings, or material comforts". So SJ's and NP's will be described as not being into those things, which I find not always accurate.

    He does say:
    "Extraverted Intuition (Ne) is a novelty-seeking function. At first glance, Se and Ne types may seem fairly similar (such conflation can be seen, for instance, in the Enneagram Seven), since both ESPs and ENPs can be outwardly active, energetic, and playful. Ne differs from Se, however, in that it is more concerned with ideas, connections, and possibilities than it is with novel sensations or material goods."

    Still, non-Se types can enjoy material comforts. I think that's just natural for everyone. I guess I know I'm not particularly into "novel physical pleasures" and "lavish surroundings", though, but I know SJ's who would like lavishness.

    So it seemed like a very good introduction to typology. Sort of like the way many would recommend Lenore's Personality Type: An Owner's Manual. His presentation reminded me a little of that; only much shorter and more concise. Especially the way it goes back to the Jungian roots of focusing on the dominant for each function, and the new points, such as this "integration" concept.
    APS Profile: Inclusion: e/w=1/6 (Supine) |Control: e/w=7/3 (Choleric) |Affection: e/w=1/9 (Supine)
    Ti 54.3 | Ne 47.3 | Si 37.8 | Fe 17.7 | Te 22.5 | Ni 13.4 | Se 18.9 | Fi 27.9

    Temperament (APS) from scratch -- MBTI Type from scratch
    Type Ideas

  2. #2
    Senior Member Alea_iacta_est's Avatar
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    Interesting stuff, and I agree with the assertion that through healthy usage of the more conscious functions, integration occurs with the less conscious functions.

  3. #3
    Senior Member yeghor's Avatar
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    My Fe in Ni-Fe works towards anticipating how people will react if I do a certain thing... so that I can sidestep and adjust my stance to theirs...

    This of course results in codependent and passive behaviour... an (risk) avoidance mechanism of sorts... It's like "I have to understand people and anticipate their behaviour so as not to get hurt (physically or emotionally)...

    So my Fe-aux gathers people's behaviour and attitude data from the external world to be synthesized by my Ni-dom function...

    So how does Ne work for INTPs? What does it gather from the external world for Ti's use?

  4. #4
    Senior Member yeghor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alea_iacta_est View Post
    Interesting stuff, and I agree with the assertion that through healthy usage of the more conscious functions, integration occurs with the less conscious functions.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Alea_iacta_est's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeghor View Post
    ?

  6. #6
    Senior Member yeghor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alea_iacta_est View Post
    ?
    Oh one of the cats is me...

  7. #7
    ndovjtjcaqidthi
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeghor View Post
    Oh one of the cats is me...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Alea_iacta_est's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeghor View Post
    Oh one of the cats is me...
    I figured that out easily, but the relevance of that in this thread was a mystery, as it seemed entirely inane and futile. It's a false analogy anyhow, I would have chosen a leopard and a mouse.

    I would ask that one of the mods (@highlander?) please remove this conversation and the next reply to this post to the off-topic thread so that this thread can keep on track and not delineate to useless tangents.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Robopop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post
    He also goes into J/P and the EJ, IJ, EP, IP groups in the intro. He puts a big focus on the fact that IP's are actually dominant "judgers", and IJ's are dominant "perceivers", so he tends to treat them in a reverse J/P fashion (like Socionics), and thus having a lot in common with the E types with the opposite J/P (dominant function with opposite attitude).
    This is where he really messes up, IPs are pretty much the opposites of the EJs, it makes no sense typologically speaking to group them together, IPs still have the Ji/Pe preference that EPs have.

    He describes IPs as being very goal oriented and initiative(over the IJs) but this is strange considering they have Fe/Te as their inferior, INTPs for instance are usually only motivated by a kind of aimless curiosity, beyond that point(when it comes to application) most lose interest, he seems to actually think IPs have a task orientation similar to EJs but couldn't be further from the truth. Even EPs are more "goal oriented" than IPs.

    This dude has some stuff right but he is misguided because he thinks Ji dominance is similar to Je dominance with the only difference being internal/external orientation.
    Reserved Calm Unstructured Egocentric Inquisitive Clown

    Johari Nohari

  10. #10
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Well, the internal/external orientation makes a big difference. Because IP's are internally oriented with their J, you generally don't see it, and you only see the "openness" of the external perception. That's what then characterizes the "J/P" preference.
    I know it sounds farfetched, and he probably could have worded it differently or something, but there really is something to that. When thinking about this more, recently, I'm realizing, that yeah, I'm just as closed as I see the J's as; only it's internally based. The J's do in fact often think we're ridiculously "rigid" or closeminded, because to them, the course of action is decided by the object. So to them, we look like we're just "being that way" for no reason at all, because our standard is not the external object right before us.
    APS Profile: Inclusion: e/w=1/6 (Supine) |Control: e/w=7/3 (Choleric) |Affection: e/w=1/9 (Supine)
    Ti 54.3 | Ne 47.3 | Si 37.8 | Fe 17.7 | Te 22.5 | Ni 13.4 | Se 18.9 | Fi 27.9

    Temperament (APS) from scratch -- MBTI Type from scratch
    Type Ideas
    Likes asynartetic liked this post

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