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  1. #31
    Senior Member Oso Mocoso's Avatar
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    My two best friends are ISFPs. My guy friend is a very masculine auto mechanic. My female friend is a classically trained artist. In terms of specifically their gender roles, they have practically nothing in common. In a lot of other ways, they're on the same page.

  2. #32
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    Just how feminine does one have to appear to be considered "effeminate"? Clearly sexual orientation has no bearing. Anyhow I am not sure what type has to do with this.

  3. #33
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    It depends on your definition of masculine I suppose, if being masculine is to be aggressive and uncaring then I'm not that at all.

  4. #34
    soft and silky sarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by "?" View Post
    Just how feminine does one have to appear to be considered "effeminate"? Clearly sexual orientation has no bearing. Anyhow I am not sure what type has to do with this.
    Yeah, good question. It all depends on what you've been conditioned since birth to believe. Those of us who grew up in environments that accepted a wide variety of human behaviors as being non-gender specific (such as crying when you feel sad, or being bold and assertive when you need to make a point) are likely not to go around labelling behavior as being either too masculine (for women) or too feminine (for men).

    Sarah
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  5. #35
    Senior Member Sunshine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarah View Post
    Yeah, good question. It all depends on what you've been conditioned since birth to believe. Those of us who grew up in environments that accepted a wide variety of human behaviors as being non-gender specific (such as crying when you feel sad, or being bold and assertive when you need to make a point) are likely not to go around labelling behavior as being either too masculine (for women) or too feminine (for men).

    Sarah
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    I guess I grew up in one of those environments.

  6. #36
    soft and silky sarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunshine View Post
    I guess I grew up in one of those environments.

    Yeah, and then when you go to school and you start learning that most everybody ELSE lives by a bunch of seemingly pointless gender rules, it doesn't make sense. I never overtly questioned anybody's social rules, but I did spend a lot of time wondering why they existed in the first place. :rolli:

    Sarah
    ISFP

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by sarah View Post
    (pats Jeffster on the back)

    Hey, it's okay, ALL my male friends cry during movies. I say it's a sign that they are truly "emotionally literate" people. Hee! (well, or else it just means they just like tearjerker dramas...) Actually, there was an ISTP on another type list I'm on who said he cries during movies too, so I don't think it's an F thing. And I recall a (possibly) ISTP guy I dated in grad school once said to me that anybody who never cried when Old Yeller died is heartless.



    Sarah
    I balled watching the Poseiden Adventure when the fat lady drowned

  8. #38
    Senior Member riel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunshine View Post
    I think it's hilarious that most of the male ISFPs I know consider themselves to be effeminate while I, a female ISFP, have even been mistaken for a male on other forums. (I thought here on this forum my gender was obvious though.)

    ISFPs are you:

    A) A masculine male
    B) A tomboy female
    C) An effeminate male
    D) A feminine female
    D..though I'm not into makeup and trends in clothes. I just wear what's comfortable.

  9. #39
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    When I was young, i told people I was a tomboy because i didn't want to play netball like the other galzzz. And then it stuck

  10. #40
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    This is an interesting post!

    I grew up a semi-tomboy (but I had FOUR <count 'em> brothers, three of them older than me). I still have a tomboy feel to me I guess. But I'm comfortable with being stereotypically feminine in a lot of ways. I do wear makeup and find it particularly enjoyable to wear stylish-looking clothing.

    All that said, I agree with some of you others that this has nothing to do with type. I've known really masculine-y guy ESFPs, for instance, and REALLY effeminate ones as well. I think that it's a separate thing (type and gender portrayal).

    What does seem to have a lot to do with type, at least being an ISFP, in my opinion, is that whatever we <i>are</i> into we aren't afraid to show it. I don't even mean this as specific to gender roles, just anything.

    My ex-boyfriend (ISFP) was very into body piercing and wasn't afraid to show this to EVERYONE (including showing his illegal testical piercing...). This didn't really bother me, but I would probably not have shown that part of my body to random strangers - that's just me. However, I'm not afraid to show that which I am personally into, proud of, or that I identify with.

    Hmm, and I will say he was a pretty immature ISFP, my ex, very, very cocky in certain situations. Definitely could have been misread for an immature ISTP -- if you weren't very familiar with ISFP types a bit.

    Malia
    ISFP

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