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  1. #41
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nocapszy View Post
    True.
    Yes.
    A small amplification.

    A conclusion based on perception is faulty.
    A conclusion based on reflection of perception may be correct.

  2. #42
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    Well, I'd like to point out that generally, people attempt to form rationalization or justification for their judgement. When it comes to perception, people don't feel a need for much justification. If they perceiver something, they believe it is so, and that's that.

    If I a person says "tomatoes are good for you", that's judgement. They're going to use a bunch of reasons, based off of proofs or sentimental values or what have you, to justify the statement that tomatoes are good for you. They could be entirely wrong in their justification, but they still feel the need to try.

    But what if the subject was the tomato's existence? The person sees the tomato, and so presumes it's there. That was a perception. There was no justification involved, other then "I see it". It is perceived, and so its existence unquestioned, even at the sub-conscious level. If I tell this person "there's no tomato there", they'd look at me like I'm being crazy. If I asked "what reason do you have to believe the tomato is there?", they'd probably say "look! It's right there!". That's a lot of faith in perception.


    It's easier to deal with conclusions because they are rationalized. I can use a person's own reasoning system to try and convince them that they are wrong, or prove that I am right. And further more, self-doubt is more likely to creep in, because reasoning is elaborate, and complex, and vulnerable to counter-points as I mentioned above. People hate being wrong, or at least feeling and looking wrong, so they aren't as likely to push for something they have too little faith in.

    But again, perception has no justificaiton. It's like a gut feeling(sometimes it literally is). You can't reason with someone's perceptions. There is no method to persuade them. Often, when people get into an argument over perception, it just becomes a "yuh-huh", "nuh-uh" argument. Like with memories for instance. "It happened this way". "No. It happened this way". Not a bit of reasoning is involved. And notice that if you ever do use reasoning to explain how a perception might be incorrect, that you may see a tomato, but a tomato is not really there, a commmon response is "I know what I saw".
    Again, that doesn't prove anything, but is said with such certainty, because a person feels justified merely by perceiving something.

    *pardon and sloppiness or rambling qualities in that post, I just wrote it out on the spot. It was not very meditiated*
    Go to sleep, iguana.


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  3. #43
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    If I were an S, it would seem like things would be dry almost..no place to escape to, you're just constantly here, in the "now".

  4. #44
    Senior Member Sunshine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    If I were an S, it would seem like things would be dry almost..no place to escape to, you're just constantly here, in the "now".
    Everyone has an imagination.

    Also, I'm betting different people want to escape from different things. Like a friend of mine...she hates the dark thoughts that overwhelm her when she's alone. She tries to escape them by constantly being in the now.

  5. #45
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    If I were an S, it would seem like things would be dry almost..no place to escape to, you're just constantly here, in the "now".
    I found plenty of escapes. That's what the internet is for.
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