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  1. #1

    Default Being an Asian ESTP

    I'm an ASIAN ESTP! And sometimes I laugh to myself merrily about it, for the irony of being born into a society of dominant "I" "S" and "J"s.

    Meet my Dad, typical Asian lawyer, working in a prestigious law firm. Typical conversations with him will be "How are your studies girl?" "What are you doing tomorrow?" "Sleep early, or you'll get a tight slap" (Happened to me when I was a kid I got spanked alot And yes, he still talks to me like that sometimes! DO IT OR ELSE)

    Then there's my Mum, who came from a less educated background from my Dad, where she grew up in a tiny tribal village in Taiwan. Mum's an ESFP I think, and she's always talking about makeup, how to look pretty, and marrying young.

    So, I mentioned before somewhere on this thread I grew up in Asia, where I was the naughtiest kid in school! I loved reading storybooks and watching Teenage Mutant ninja turtles, and goodness knows why but my English was my best subject. Class was always too boring, so I stirred it up by arguing with teachers, or catching centipedes and releasing it in class in my all-girls school. I was bad at home too, I used to climb into my neighbours house, kidnap their cat and tie it on top of the car at home, and my dog would try to climb up and get at the poor kitty. (but back then I didn't feel sorry for it)

    So teachers requested my parents to send this "bad kid" abroad.

    This only happened 1 and a half years ago when I moved to Melbourne, where I became a Christian and went to the punkiest church you can find, Planetshakers, I'm studying Masters of Med Science in Melbourne Uni and I love life here now and I finally feel comfortable. My hobby? Playing the guitar, driving, jogging, and Japanese martial Arts, Aikido (I'm one belt below black ). However, people still tell me I'm "not like other Asians", whatever that means, or they think I'm mixed (I have funny features and brown hair) My theory is that it means that I'm outgoing! Other Asians? They'll just think I'm crazy. I had such a hard time in Singapore because everyone in school... all they did was study and study And they were always paranoid about getting into a prestigious and good school

    One of my best pals, for e.g, Australia Idol wannabe Jaime (in my avatar) and he's still trying to be a musician. He's really girly (to me) and I feel like I'm the boyfriend most of the time! I slap him and yell at him all the time and he always looks really..erm..sad. (He's ENFP) I always have to ask God to give me the patience to deal with him sometimes, I dont have the vision to see him as a musician but whatever *rolls eyes* I pray he gets there.

    I'm friends with a bunch of really sporty girls, but I'm always hanging out with a wide range of people, and alot of them are computer geeks, and NFs, who I can hardly understand but I'm beginning to In fact, I know them so well they sorta get annoyed at me. When they ask whats there to do at my house if they're coming over, I'll point at my PS2, (that's Playstation 2 for non-nerds) and they'll be like "Oh shutup, you're stereotyping us again". My housemate is this really quiet INFJ, I don't bother her but we get along strangely well and she doesnt mind playing Time Crisis 3 on Ps2 with me

    All in all, that sorta describes me pretty well. Wonder what you guys think about Asian society and the Myer Briggs! I gotta say that, living in Singapore was difficult for me and even thinking about visiting home makes my stomach turn! I find it hard to talk to people who don't understand my jokes, and going out with mum and dad was difficult Hooray that now I'm 21, living independently and saving up to buy the motorbike of my dreams!

  2. #2

    Default

    looks like i'm ESFP!

  3. #3
    ~dangerous curves ahead~
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    LOL. Babe, as an Asian ENTP, it isn't much easier. At least your S would help you relate to the STJs running amok on the island. *deflates*

  4. #4

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    share you experiences that's what i wanna hear

  5. #5
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Being an E__P in any modern society sounds like a bit of a hassle. Especially in regimented Asian societies. They do everything in such a perfectionist manner, and work so hard that they barely have time to relax. They're very engaged and success-oriented, even more than people in our country. They push themselves to achieve everything within reason. It's scary, really.

    I'm glad you found a way to deal with it, though.

  6. #6

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    but my way of "dealing with it" was to move to Australia, it can be seen as an escape valve. i've always wanted to explore how other Asians deal with this.

    I have been through and understood the frustration among young people at home in Singapore. Small land area, social pressures, struggling to conform. when i went to school with very local kids at 17, I actually spoke bad english just to conform with them, because it was actually an unspoken requisite to being accepted as a Singaporean. Otherwise, they would think i was educated overseas and hence putting on airs

    I agree perfectionistic is the appropriate word to describe working conditions in Asia, there was so much pressure for students to move forward and advance towards whatever would create openings for "relevant jobs in the future".

    As a kid I had many ideas I always wanted to contribute in class. I can't ever forget parents-teachers day meetings, and teachers telling my parents I should be sent overseas to a place where my creativity could be stimulated. The problem was, I was actually scolded for causing problems! I often asked my peers at school why they didn't feel bored in class, and they would just shrug and tell me its better to play along. Most of the time, I would monkey about quietly (until I get caught), look out of the window and pass the time thinking about things.

    My parents got me tuition teachers for just about everything. English, Chinese, Maths, Science, Piano, Art, and swimming. I kid you not, at 10 I had at least 5 tuition classes a week. After school, I did not go anywhere but home - mum would drive me home, and I would have my classes.

    And then there was getting slapped on the hands with rulers. I got hit during piano lessons all the times for playing the wrong notes. I got angry at the system - I got angry at the fact that I was hit for making mistakes that resulted from the lack of piano practice, rather than from mischief. This thought occured to me all the time. But where can a kid go with all their problems? Whenever I talked to mum, she would just explain to me I'm not working hard enough. I had to work hard to get a good job like Dad so I wouldn't starve in the future.

    But I could not care less whether or not "I got a good job". It led to me having no motive in life for anything I did, except to use the generous amount of pocket money I had on clothes, parties and friends. Since I wasn't allowed out of the house, I climbed out through the window. So for a long time, I wondered and wondered. Why am I so strange and different, and why does everyone else want stability and a "good job" so much. I had never met any other "wild child" like me - I thought I was wierd till I went to Australia and now I just sigh and look away when drunk people strip on the road outside my house

    When I came by MBTI, I did quite alot of interested reading but had a problem pinpointing my type. I must admit I'm not good at reading people's type, and that's probably the reason why I'm asking for help in making analyses. I also wonder what mum and dad would think about being in an inter-racial relationship, my personal belief is that all humans are one race, (so sure I am of that!) Mum doesnt mind, but Dad is a J and is very traditional My parents have always told me that its hard for Asians to get along with Aussies, but they're surprised I have such a big group of good friends so far

  7. #7
    The elder Holmes Mycroft's Avatar
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    A point of curiosity for me is how these supposed "national characteristics" come to be. In my experience, the MBTI distributions are pretty much the same in every country. (If you'll pardon me for introducing anecdotal "evidence".)

    The notion of culture, as most people understand it, is largely poppycock.

  8. #8
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mycroft View Post
    The notion of culture, as most people understand it, is largely poppycock.
    You know, I had thought of that myself once. Most people from other places who think of Texas think of cowboys, open desert, oil rigs, saloons, etc. When they get there and see Dallas or Houston, they're a bit surprised...

    I imagine it's the same with stereotypes of most other cultures... they're really only about one particular group/paradigm, possibly one that's a bit more influential/common, sometimes even just the most unique one.

  9. #9
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hungrypossum View Post
    This only happened 1 and a half years ago when I moved to Melbourne, where I became a Christian and went to the punkiest church you can find, Planetshakers, I'm studying Masters of Med Science in Melbourne Uni and I love life here now and I finally feel comfortable. My hobby? Playing the guitar, driving, jogging, and Japanese martial Arts, Aikido (I'm one belt below black ). However, people still tell me I'm "not like other Asians", whatever that means, or they think I'm mixed (I have funny features and brown hair) My theory is that it means that I'm outgoing! Other Asians? They'll just think I'm crazy. I had such a hard time in Singapore because everyone in school... all they did was study and study And they were always paranoid about getting into a prestigious and good school
    Another Aussie! (Well, close enough.) Rock on!

    Welcome to the boards!

    Quote Originally Posted by hungrypossum View Post
    One of my best pals, for e.g, Australia Idol wannabe Jaime (in my avatar) and he's still trying to be a musician. He's really girly (to me) and I feel like I'm the boyfriend most of the time! I slap him and yell at him all the time and he always looks really..erm..sad. (He's ENFP) I always have to ask God to give me the patience to deal with him sometimes, I dont have the vision to see him as a musician but whatever *rolls eyes* I pray he gets there.
    Aw, I wish him luck with that! I hope you realise how rare it is for an ENFP to have a dream that they pursue for more than a few months!?

    Quote Originally Posted by hungrypossum View Post
    I had never met any other "wild child" like me - I thought I was wierd till I went to Australia and now I just sigh and look away when drunk people strip on the road outside my house
    Hahaha.


    *cough*

    Okay, seriously.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mycroft View Post
    A point of curiosity for me is how these supposed "national characteristics" come to be. In my experience, the MBTI distributions are pretty much the same in every country. (If you'll pardon me for introducing anecdotal "evidence".)
    It probably has something to do with circumstances: for example, if you risk starvation if you don't work your butt off every day, even the most careless ExxP is going to put in some good work. When the situation is similar for generations and generations, it ends up as 'culture', and even when the circumstances are no longer as dire, constant parental/societal pressure to be as hardworking as they are (for eg.) has a lot of influence.

    That's my guess, anyway. Thoughts?

    Something has to produce those stereotypes/cultural differences, (yes, even though they're stereotypes, they do have basis in fact) and if the MBTI type distribution is relatively equal in any culture, then it must be external circumstances (nurture vs. nature, if you will) that changes things.
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

  10. #10
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mycroft View Post
    A point of curiosity for me is how these supposed "national characteristics" come to be. In my experience, the MBTI distributions are pretty much the same in every country. (If you'll pardon me for introducing anecdotal "evidence".)

    The notion of culture, as most people understand it, is largely poppycock.
    Yeah. I heard Asians were mostly INTPs.

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